Culture and heritage

Heritage of NSW

Successful conservation plans

One of the most important tools used in the management of heritage-listed places is the Conservation Management Plan. A well prepared Conservation Management Plan is a recipe for conserving a heritage place for future generations. It determines what is significant about a place and explains how to look after that significance.

Plan locating cisterns adjacent to the kitchen block at Bella Vista Farm. The use of clear, simple diagrams enables the locations and relationships of physical elements to be concisely shown and understood. Bella Vista Farm Conservation Management Plan, DPWS Heritage Design Services, endorsed December 1999.

Plan locating cisterns adjacent to the kitchen block at Bella Vista Farm. The use of clear, simple diagrams enables the locations and relationships of physical elements to be concisely shown and understood. Bella Vista Farm Conservation Management Plan, DPWS Heritage Design Services, endorsed December 1999.

Each year the Heritage Council reviews many Conservation Management Plans and in 1999 it endorsed 32 plans, three times as many as the previous year.The high quality of these plans reflects the cooperative approach now being taken by heritage practitioners and the Heritage Office.

To help those preparing Conservation Management Plans, Heritage Office historian, Bruce Baskerville, has come up with some tips. Here are some things to consider when writing your plan:

  • construct a clear, logical flow between sections;
  • use plain English rather than arcane jargon to produce an effective and easily understood document;
  • consider using graphics where appropriate. Often a graphic can illustrate a point more effectively than text;
  • integrate your investigation of the place's history with the fabric survey so that they work together and explain each other;
  • include a comparative analysis to help give an idea of a place's level of significance, for example, whether it is of State or local significance;
  • look beyond the building to archaeology, landscapes and movable heritage;
  • ensure that the Statement of Significance is concise and answers the question as to how and why a place is significant;
  • provide a focus on what conservation work needs to be done and the order in which the works should occur;
  • explain where and what type (if any) of new development can occur in relation to a heritage item and how the significance of an item can be maintained while still allowing change to occur.
One of the last loads of wool packed out by camel from Mount Wood, 1917. Photograph by Thomas Hartley, courtesy of RAHS Collection

One of the last loads of wool packed out by camel from Mount Wood, 1917. Photograph by Thomas Hartley, courtesy of RAHS Collection.

One of the last loads of wool packed out by camel from Mount Wood, 1917. Photograph by Thomas Hartley, courtesy of RAHS Collection

Stock transport at Mount Wood, 1973. Photograph courtesy of NPWS, Tibooburra. These photographs illustrate the changing methods for transporting wool and stock at Mount Wood station and the impact over time on the buildings and landscapes. Conservation Management Plan, Mount Wood Complex, Sturt National Park, Peter Freeman P/L and others, endorsed December 1999.

Page last updated: 01 September 2012