Culture and heritage

Heritage of NSW

Yiu Ming temple

Fireworks, lion dances, Chinese food and music were all part of the celebrations when the historic Yiu Ming Temple in Alexandria was added to the State Heritage Register.

Musicians and lion dance at the Yiu Ming Temple in Alexandria. Photograph courtesy of South Sydney Council.

Musicians and lion dance at the Yiu Ming Temple in Alexandria. Photograph courtesy of South Sydney Council.

Harry Choy, President of the Yiu Ming Society, Councillor Vic Smith, Mayor of South Sydney; Mrs Hazel Hawke, Chair of the Heritage Council; the Hon. Henry Tsang, MLC, and Mr H. E. Wu Keming, Chinese Consul General joined the Chinese community in celebrating the listing of the temple, one of the first items nominated by the Chinese community for inclusion on the State Heritage Register.

Unveiling the bronze plaque signifying the new listing, the Deputy Premier Andrew Refshauge, Minister for Urban Affairs and Planning, Minister for Aboriginal Affairs and Minister for Housing described the Yiu Ming temple as "one of the most significant Chinese temples in Australia today."

Mr Harry Choy, President of the Yiu Ming Society and Dr Andrew Refshauge, Deputy Premier and Minister for Urban Affairs and Planning. Photograph courtesy of South Sydney Council.

Mr Harry Choy, President of the Yiu Ming Society and Dr Andrew Refshauge, Deputy Premier and Minister for Urban Affairs and Planning. Photograph courtesy of South Sydney Council.

Mr Henry Tsang, MLC, and Mrs Hazel Hawke, Chair of the Heritage Council. Photograph courtesy of South Sydney Council.

Mr Henry Tsang, MLC, and Mrs Hazel Hawke, Chair of the Heritage Council. Photograph courtesy of South Sydney Council.

The Yiu Ming Temple is one of only a small number of Chinese temples that survive in NSW. It remains much as it was when it was originally built in 1908. Crafted by Chinese carpenters, it is a unique blend of Chinese temple design and Federation detailing.

"This listing means that future generations will be able to visit and worship in the temple and that the history of Chinese-Australians on this site will continue, as it has since the early Sydney Chinese first worked the market gardens of the area 130 years ago" said Dr Refshauge.

Page last updated: 01 September 2012