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Mount Gibraltar Trachyte Quarries Complex in Bowral added to State Heritage Register

The remains of over 100 years of quarrying have left their marks on the landscape.  The debris at the base of Quarry C shows the results of the labours at this site.

Quarry C located on the southern side of Mount Gibraltar

For 100 years, the Mount Gibraltar Trachyte Quarries Complex provided the rare stone used to build everything from landmarks like the Queen Victoria Building and Martin Place banks to stone kerbs in the city of Sydney. The strength and beauty of this trachyte made it ideal for the construction of the buildings and places that are now the symbols of the growth of our State.

 

Mount Gibraltar is a volcanic intrusion that cooled in such a way as to form this special rock. 180 million years of erosion have exposed the rock. Today there are six distinct quarrying locations regarded as being of state significance.

Reasons for listing

The Minister directed the listing of the Mount Gibraltar Trachyte Quarries Complex on the State Heritage Register for the following reasons:

  • The Mount Gibraltar Quarries are state significant as purpose built quarries that were used consistently for 100 years of quarrying, from 1886 to 1986;
  • Listing will provide for the identification and registration of this item of state heritage significance;
  • Listing will promote an understanding of the state’s heritage; and
  • Listing will encourage the conservation of this item of the state’s heritage.

Media release

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Glebe Island Bridge receives highest heritage honour in NSW

Glebe Island Bridge’s central pivot for the swing span

Glebe Island Bridge's central pivot for the swing span
(Source: National Trust of Australia NSW)

The Hon Robyn Parker MP, Minister for Heritage, has directed listing Glebe Island Bridge on the State Heritage Register. Dating from 1903, Glebe Island Bridge represents one of Australia's earliest electric-powered swing bridges. It survives as one of only two of its type which is still operable in New South Wales; together with Pyrmont Bridge. Both bridges were designed by Percy Allan, a highly-regarded Australian bridge designer of the late 19th and early 20th century. Listing Glebe Island Bridge on the State Heritage Register recognises its outstanding heritage significance to the people of New South Wales. State listing also ensures that major changes to the bridge are approved or reviewed by the state's peak heritage body, the Heritage Council of NSW.

Reasons for listing

The Minister directed listing Glebe Island Bridge on the State Heritage Register for the following reasons:

  • Glebe Island Bridge is considered to be of state significance as one of Australia’s earliest examples of an electric-powered swing bridge and one of only two of its kind surviving in New South Wales which are still operable, together with Pyrmont Swing Bridge. Both bridges were designed by Percy Allan, a highly-regarded Australian bridge designer of the late nineteenth and early twentieth century;
  • Listing will provide for the identification and registration of this item of State heritage significance;
  • Listing will promote an understanding of the State’s heritage; and
  • Listing will encourage the conservation of this item of the State’s heritage.

More information

Kamay Botany Bay National Park (North and South) and Towra Point Nature Reserve listed on the State Heritage Register

 

Shrubby heath plants lead to the rocky promontory of Cape Banks, in the background is the deep blue of the Pacific Ocean where it enters the heads of Botany Bay and on the far horizon the cliffs of the Kurnell side of the bay.

View to the heads of Botany Bay (Kamay) with Cape Banks in the foreground.

Kamay Botany Bay National Park and Towra Point Nature Reserve – one of the most remarkable cultural and natural landscapes in Australia – has been listed on the NSW State Heritage Register. The meeting of Indigenous Australians and Europeans at this site, and the events which followed, shaped the history of our nation.

 

This is the site where Lieutenant James Cook claimed ownership for Britain; the Gweagal people resisted the Europeans in order to protect their spiritual and cultural home; French explorers arrived and spent several weeks in the area and remarkable botanical “discoveries” were made by Joseph Banks and Daniel Solander. Even Captain Arthur Phillip and the first fleet stopped here before going on to Port Jackson to set up a new colony. The site is of outstanding heritage significance as a rare place demonstrating the continuous history of occupation of the east coast of Australia.

Traditional custodians for the land and the current Aboriginal community have strong associations with the site. Because of its bountiful resources, the north and south headlands of Botany Bay were important ceremonial places for the Dharawal on the south of Botany Bay and the Darug on the northern shores, while Kurnell was possibly a semi-permanent home for the Gweagal.

Kamay Botany Bay National park and Towra Point Nature Reserve are a critical link in the network of parks and reserves that conserve the biodiversity of our state.

Reasons for listing

The Minister directed the listing of Kamay Botany Bay National Park (North and South) and Towra Point Nature Reserve on the State Heritage Register for the following reasons:

  • Kamay Botany Bay National Park (North and South) and Towra Point Nature Reserve is considered to be of state significance as a culturally significant place for Dharawal people, as the place where important historical events took place that had profound implications for our nation’s cultural identity including the landing of Lieutenant James Cook in HMB Endeavour;
  • Listing will provide for the identification and registration of this item of State heritage significance,
  • Listing will promote an understanding of the State’s heritage; and
  • Listing will encourage the conservation of this item of the State’s heritage.

Media release

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Illoura Reserve listed on the State Heritage Register

 

A sandstone path winds across the grass to the waters edge where the trees cast long shadows.

Illoura Reserve on Sydney Harbour with its sandstone paths and native trees.

Outstanding twentieth century urban park - Illoura Reserve in Balmain East - has been placed on the State Heritage Register. Designed by one of Australia’s most influential landscape designers, Bruce Mackenzie in 1970, in what was to be a crucial turning point in the design of public open space, a derelict waterfront industrial dumping ground in Balmain East was transformed into an urban bush park.

 

Illoura Reserve was an important forerunner to the implementation of the Sydney Bush School landscape design philosophy in public parks and was part of a movement towards environmentally-conscious landscape design. Illoura Reserve rejected more formal traditional European-based design, instead it drew upon the bush landscape of Sydney region for inspiration.

Illoura Reserve influenced later generations of landscape designers in Australia and is described by the Australian Institute of Landscape Architects to be a critical contribution to Australian landscape architecture.

Reasons for listing

The Minister directed the listing of Illoura Reserve on the State Heritage Register for the following reasons:

  • Illoura Reserve is considered to be of state significance as an outstanding twentieth century urban park that was an important forerunner to the implementation of the Sydney Bush School landscape design philosophy in public parks;
  • Listing will provide for the identification and registration of this item of State heritage significance,
  • Listing will promote an understanding of the State’s heritage; and
  • Listing will encourage the conservation of this item of the State’s heritage.

More information

Baronda listed on the State Heritage Register

 

Photograph depicts the façade of this timber

Baronda holiday house, an innovative design in timber pole construction dating from 1968, which overlooks Nelson Lagoon in Mimosa Rocks National Park

This ecologically sensitive holiday house is nestled in bushland overlooking a pristine lagoon within a national park on the far south coast of NSW. Dating from 1968, Baronda is a fine modern design in timber pole construction and rare in NSW as a substantial early work by Melbourne architect, Graeme Gunn. Baronda was commissioned by David Yencken, the first chair of the Australian Heritage Commission, who in 1976 gave the house in its 30 hectare lot to the state of NSW. This philanthropic gesture, made soon after the gifting of nearby Penders estate by Roy Grounds and Ken Myer, contributed to the establishment of the Mimosa Rocks National Park and preserves this idyllic coastal land in public ownership.

Reasons for listing

The Minister directed the listing of Baronda on the State Heritage Register for the following reasons:

  • Baronda is considered to be of State significance as a fine Modern Movement holiday house constructed with ecological sensitivity within a superb natural landscape;
  • Listing will provide for the identification and registration of this item of state heritage significance,
  • Listing will promote an understanding of the State’s heritage; and
  • Listing will encourage the conservation of this item of the State’s heritage.

More information

Penders listed on the State Heritage Register

 

Photograph depicts the façade of a hexagonal structure with yellow canvas sides and a cone shaped roof of corrugated iron, within a leafy national park setting.

The Barn at Penders in Mimosa Rocks National Park has influenced generations of Australian architects

Penders is a collection of experimental structures in pristine bushland on the far south coast of NSW, designed by one of Australia’s leading Modern Movement architects Roy Grounds. From the 1960s Penders became a holiday retreat for the Melbourne-based families of Grounds and his businessman friend and client, Kenneth Myer. "The Barn", which has influenced generations of Australian architects, is one of two innovatively designed residences on the site and demonstrates Grounds’ use of geometry to bring about a harmonious union between nature and culture. The generous donation of Penders in 1972 by the Grounds and Myers families to the state of NSW contributed to the establishment of the Mimosa Rocks National Park and preserves this idyllic coastal land in public ownership.

 

Reasons for listing

The Minister directed the listing of Penders on the State Heritage Register for the following reasons:

  • Penders is considered to be of state significance as it comprises a rare suite of modernist buildings, and structures designed by the renowned architect Sir Roy Grounds within a setting of great natural beauty. Penders was used by Grounds as an experimental workshop for the exploration of creative structures, and experiments that influenced the evolution of modernist architecture across Australia in the later half of the twentieth century. The Penders site also has a strong association with Kenneth Myer, member of the prominent Myer retail family. The site demonstrates his ecological aims and interest in the commercial use of native timbers through its partially extant timber plantation and remains of the experimental shed for the Tanalithic timber preservation process. The place demonstrates the shared interests of Grounds and Myers in architecture and sculpture, in native forestry, and in the preservation and rehabilitation of the natural environment. The donation of the site to the state of NSW to expand the Mimosa Rocks National Park is an expression of their philanthropy and their belief in public ownership of coastal lands across Australia;
  • Listing will provide for the identification and registration of this item of State heritage significance,
  • Listing will promote an understanding of the State’s heritage; and
  • Listing will encourage the conservation of this item of the State's heritage.

More information

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Page last updated: 23 December 2013