Culture and heritage

Heritage

Research on heritage topics

Thoughts on the `When' and `How' of government historic heritage protection

The Allen Consulting Group, 2005

This research report was commissioned by the Heritage Chairs and Officials of Australia and New Zealand to inform debate about:

  • the circumstances when it is appropriate for government to intervene to protect historic heritage places; and
  • the manner in which historic heritage is protected by governments.

The views in this report reflect those of The Allen Consulting Group, and not necessarily those of the Heritage Chairs and Officials of Australia and New Zealand or their respective governments. The report is complemented by another research report that addresses the value of heritage protection to the community. (See below: Valuing the Priceless: The Value of Historic Heritage in Australia)

Thoughts on the When and How of Government Heritage Protection (ResearchGovernmentHerProtection2005.pdf, 540KB)

Valuing the priceless: the value of historic heritage in Australia

The Allen Consulting Group, 2005

This research report was commissioned by the Heritage Chairs and Officials of Australia and New Zealand to gauge community views on the value of heritage protection to the general population.

Most previous heritage research has tended to focus on the economic, rather than the cultural, value of heritage. An online survey of 2024 adult Australians was undertaken to:

  • identify people's views on a number of matters, which would in turn point to some elements of social capital affected by historic heritage place protection; and
  • quantify the values that people attach to a number of attributes of protection afforded to historic heritage places using the `choice modelling'technique.

The views in this report reflect those of The Allen Consulting Group, and not necessarily those of the Heritage Chairs and Officials of Australia and New Zealand or their respective governments. The report is complemented by another research report that addresses the circumstances when it is appropriate for government to intervene to protect historic heritage places; and the manner in which historic heritage places are protected by governments. (See report above: Thoughts on the When and How of Government Heritage Protection.)

Valuing the Priceless: The Value of Historic Heritage in Australia (ResearchValuingthePriceless2005.pdf, 1.9MB)

Revolving funds for historic heritage

National Incentives Taskforce for the Environment Protection and Heritage Council, April 2005

This information paper by a joint taskforce of Commonwealth, State and Territory heritage officials compares how revolving funds operate for historic and nature conservation. The revolving funds concept is very successful and well accepted overseas, and is gaining currency in Australia as a tool for conservation of the natural environment. The Australian Government has contributed $4 million in recent years to assist various State Governments to establish revolving funds, such as the BushBank in WA. The report suggests that consideration by given to applying the same concept to the historic environment.

Revolving Funds for Historic Heritage (revolvingfunds.pdf, 400KB)

Heritage Australia: a review of Australian material regarding the economic and social benefits of heritage property

Professor Graeme Newell, Peter Wills and Chris Eves 2005

This document covers Australian material regarding the economic and social benefit of heritage property. The brief was to research and identity issues relating to the value of conservation. As well as covering Australian material, the report is based on the concepts contained in the 1996 report by the UK Royal Institute of Chartered Surveyors on "The value of conservation". It investigates the effects that heritage listing has on "ordinary" real estate as well as researching the value of heritage sites.

Economic and Social Benefits of Heritage Property (benefitsheritage05.pdf, 722KB)

Feasibility guidelines for heritage development applications

Col Dominy 2005

This report is the outcome of a research project commissioned by the Heritage Office on behalf of the Heritage Chairs and Officials of Australia and New Zealand on the economic assessment of development applications where the conservation outcome is tied to the achievement of a certain level of development.

The purpose of this project is to establish a framework for the presentation of financial information relating to major developments affecting heritage places. This is necessary because it is sometimes that case that a developer maintains that a certain level of development is necessary to facilitate the conservation of a heritage place, i.e. there is a nexus between development and conservation. Currently there is no method for heritage agencies to assess this information and no agreed framework for its presentation. This development assessment process needs to be transparent and accountable, but at the same time it is acknowledged that financial information relating to a project may also be confidential.

The body of the report provides a useful resource for developers, owners of heritage items and the public in explaining the development process as it affects heritage items.

Feasibility Guidelines for Heritage Development Applications (feasibility2005.pdf, 914KB)

Does the housing market value heritage?

Vinita Deodhar 2004

Recent research by Vinita Deodhar for Macquarie University asked the question "Does the Housing Market Value Heritage?". Vinita's study on Ku-ring-gai concluded that:

Heritage listed houses in Ku-ring-gai enjoy a price premium compared to unlisted houses. After controlling for other property attributes, heritage-listed houses commanded a premium of 12% on average.

The research paper has been posted on the Macquarie University website and the abstract can be downloaded from http://www.econ.mq.edu.au/research/research_students_projects/vinita_deodhar

Heritage and sustainable development

Discussion Paper

Over the last three decades ideas about sustainable development have begun to have an impact on how we make decisions and think about our world and the future. The term "sustainable development" first emerged in the early 1970s and is defined as "development that meets present needs without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs".

Heritage has the potential to improve our quality of life - by improving our understanding of the past and of ourselves - and contributing strongly to our culture. However, the Heritage Council and Heritage Office are concerned that heritage is often forgotten as a key state environmental concern and key to sustainability.

In January 2004 the Heritage Council released a discussion paper on heritage and sustainability for public comment.

The economics of heritage listing

Heritage Office, 2001

A study focussing on commercial (non-residential) properties in urban areas, by Dr Peter Abelson and Colin Dominy. Commissioned by the Heritage Office.

Page last updated: 01 September 2012