Carrai National Park

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No visitor centresNo public transportNo wheelchair facilitiesNo campingNo caravan sitesAccommodationNo lookoutsPicnics and BBQsNo kiosks/cafesNo walkingDogs and other domestic animals not permittedNo horse riding trailsNo cycling trailsNo car touring4WD touring routesNo canoeing opportunitiesNo sailing and boatingNo fishingNo areas recommended for swimmingNo areas recommended for snorkelling/divingNo adventure recreation opportunities

Inland from Kempsey, Carrai National Park protects vast tracts of eucalypt groves and subtropical rainforest on Carrai plateau, a huge granite area with steep escarpments that drop dramatically to Kunderang Brook and Macleay River.

For those with a sense of adventure, a 4WD, and some good camping gear, this part of the New England Tablelands offers an excellent opportunity to get back to the bush; very little infrastructure exists in the park’s 11,397ha. Some basic huts offer shelter at Daisy Plains, and rough tracks traverse the thick forest. One of them is the only access to Marys View lookout in neighbouring Oxley Wild Rivers National Park, and all are great for mountain bikers.

Experienced bushwalkers can trek out through the forest and enjoy jaw-dropping views across the Macleay River valley. Keep your eyes peeled too, because Carrai is home to more than 125 different species of animals, from the endangered Hastings Rivers mouse to native carnivores such as quolls and dingoes. For those with good eyes and a pair of binoculars, several vulnerable species of owls and bats also live in the park.

Park map: Carrai National Park

Local map: showing Carrai National Park

NSW map: showing Carrai National Park

Australia map: showing Carrai National Park

More info

Click on map features for more details

These maps give you a basic overview of features and facilities. They do not provide detailed information on topography and landscape, and may not be suitable for some activities. We recommend that you buy a topographic map before you go exploring.