Blue Mountains National Park

Lookouts and scenery

Enjoying the view at Anvil Rock, Blue Mountains National Park (Image: DECCW)The Blue Mountains hold some of the most wonderful scenery in New South Wales, if not Australia. But if you're heading for the mountains' famous lookouts, make sure you come in fine weather. Visit on a foggy day, and you'll be staring over the cliff into an eerie white blankness.

Lookouts and scenic vantage points

Blue Gum Forest

The historical and natural significance of the mighty Blue Gum Forest can’t be understated. It’s spoken of in hushed tones by those who know of it, and once seen, is never forgotten.

Situated in Grose Valley, in the World Heritage-listed Blue Mountains National Park, this stand of magnificent eucalypts is a fine example of closed forest. A haven for birds and wildlife, it was saved from the axe by bushwalkers in the 1930s. These intrepid nature-lovers pooled resources and bought the forest to preserve it for future generations.

For a close-up experience of the splendour of the tall stand of blue gums, you’ll have to bring your hiking boots. Access is via walking tracks from either Perrys lookdown or Pierces Pass into Grose Valley. Why not make a nature weekend of it and stay overnight at Acacia Flat campground?

Activities: walking, birdwatching, picnicking, playing and socialising

Location:  shown on Blackheath map

Getting there: Blue Gum Forest is in the northern precinct of Blue Mountains National park. Located in the Grose Valley, Blue Gum Forest can only be accessed by foot. To get there:

From Perrys lookdown:

Alternatively, if starting from Pierces Pass:

Road access: Unsealed road/trail - 2WD vehicles.

Facilities: carpark, lookout, flush toilets, trackhead/access point

Blue Mountains Heritage Centre

Wheelchair access: easy

  • This area is fully wheelchair-accessible
  • There’s a ramp from the carpark to the centre
  • The centre’s toilets have been specially designed for wheelchair access

Blue Mountains Heritage Centre is a great place to stop and find out what’s on offer in the mountains. Located near Blackheath, discover all you need to know about the activities and history that make Blue Mountains National Park one of Australia’s most popular and famous destinations.

Perfect for groups and completely wheelchair-accessible, the visitors centre hosts an interactive educational display, video screenings, gallery and a theatrette for hire. Learn about the Aboriginal heritage and local history - including plants and animals - of this unique World Heritage region.

A great pit stop on a family day trip, Fairfax Heritage walking track starts here and leads to the picnic area and scenic views of nearby Govetts Leap lookout. The more adventurous will also find detailed guides and maps for long walks to remote areas such as Acacia Flat campground.

Looking for a unique Australian-made gift? Browse the store for souvenirs, clothing and books.

Activities: walking, birdwatching, picnicking, playing and socialising

Location:  shown on Blackheath map

Getting there: Blue Mountains Heritage Centre is in the northern precinct of Blue Mountains National Park.

To get there:

  • Turn right off Great Western Highway, at Blackheath traffic lights, into Govetts Leap Road.
  • Drive for 2.5km. After passing through the park entrance, take the second exit from the roundabout.

Road access: Sealed road - 2WD vehicles.

Opening hours: Blue Mountains Heritage Centre is:

  • Open 9am – 4.30pm (Monday – Sunday)
  • Closed on Christmas Day

Facilities: flush toilets, drinking water, lookout, trackhead/access point, venue, education centre, visitor centre

Venue hire: See details

Contact: Blue Mountains (Blackheath), Phone: (02) 4787 8877

Breakfast Point Lookout

For clean fresh air and dazzling views in Blue Mountains National Park, head for Breakfast Point lookout near Wentworth Falls picnic area. An ideal getaway for families and visitors, this moderate walking track is a fabulous way to experience the natural beauty of this World Heritage-listed region, on an easy day trip from Sydney.

Accessed from Overcliff-Undercliff track you can walk amongst the rock felt ferns along the dramatic cliff-tops. On misty days, watch as the valley fills with clouds and envelopes the lush forest. It’s a great spot for birdwatching with honey-eaters, rock warblers and flocks of cockatoos flitting amongst the trees.

From the lookout, gaze across the magnificent Jamison Valley taking in Kings Tableland, Mount Solitary and Inspiration Point. There’s plenty of nearby walking tracks if you’re hungry to explore further, or head back for a delicious afternoon tea at Conservation Hut.

Activities: walking, motor vehicle use, birdwatching, picnicking, playing and socialising

Getting there: Breakfast Point lookout is in the Wentworth Falls precinct of Blue Mountains National Park. To get there from Great Western Highway, turn left into Falls Road near Wentworth Falls and follow to the picnic area is at the end of the road. The walk to Breakfast Point starts near Conservation Hut, via the Overcliff-Undercliff track.

Road access: Sealed road - 2WD vehicles.

Facilities: cafe/kiosk, carpark, drinking water, lookout, flush toilets, trackhead/access point, venue

Conservation Hut

Wheelchair access: easy

This area is fully wheelchair accessible

  • There are several designated disabled parking spots
  • Toilet facilities are wheelchair accessible

Conservation Hut at the Valley of the Waters in Wentworth Falls offers a range of hearty lunches, tasty snacks and great coffee within the beautiful World Heritage - listed Blue Mountains National Park.

Since the 1960s, the "Hut" has been a meeting place for the Blue Mountains Conservation Society and a valued rest stop for hikers. Rebuilt in mud brick in 1989 to house two Reinis Zusters paintings, the Hut continues to inspire sustainable ecological values. Today, the Conservation Hut is also a great place to meet your mates for a coffee and hearty meal before setting out on a bushwalk, and likewise, a good spot to refuel when you’ve finished hiking. Offering friendly service and beautiful surrounds, it’s also a good place to get together with friends and family for lunch or a Devonshire tea. Plus, the "Hut" is also suitable for group functions.

If you’re keen to stretch your legs, there are lots of great walks that start or finish at the Hut. You could try the Valley of the Waters track or the Nature track that finishes up at Conservation Hut.

Activities: walking, birdwatching

Location:  shown on Wentworth Falls map

Getting there: Conservation Hut is in the Wentworth Falls precinct of Blue Mountains National Park. To get there, take the Great Western Highway to Wentworth Falls. Turn left onto Falls Road and right onto Fletcher Street, you'll find the carpark at the end of Fletcher Street.

Road access: Sealed road - 2WD vehicles.

Opening hours: Conservation Hut is open

  • 9am – 4pm (Monday - Friday)
  • 9am – 5pm (Saturday - Sunday)
  • 10am (public holidays)
  • until 7.30pm during summer

Conservation Hut is closed on Christmas Day

Facilities: cafe/kiosk, carpark, drinking water, lookout, flush toilets, trackhead/access point, venue

Bookings: Check out the Conservation Hut website for more information and bookings.

Echo Point lookout (Three Sisters)

Wheelchair access: easy

This area is fully wheelchair accessible

  • There are several designated disabled car spots closer to the lookout
  • Access to the top lookout is across a wide, paved area

The Three Sisters in Blue Mountains National Park (Image: DECCW)Part of the Greater Blue Mountains World Heritage Area, the Three Sisters is an iconic formation that you must see at least once in your lifetime. There are different versions of the Aboriginal story of the Three Sisters, but what you’re bound to agree with is how truly spectacular it is.

Standing proudly in the land of the Gundungurra and Darug people, the traditional custodians of this ancient land, the imposing Three Sisters is best seen from Echo Point lookout, on the edge of the plateau above. These three weathered sandstone peaks, formed thousands of years ago through erosion, are set among the cliffs of the Jamison Valley. From the lookout, you’ll be able to see the Ruined Castle and Mount Solitary.

Echo Point lookout is the gateway to many great walks and nature experiences in the area. If you have time, Prince Henry Cliff walk connects Echo Point to Leura Cascades and takes you past many scenic lookouts along the cliff edge. Or try going down the Giant Stairway to get to the tracks below the cliffs.

Activities: walking, picnicking, playing and socialising

Location:  shown on Katoomba - Echo Point map

Getting there: Echo Point is in the Katoomba precinct of Blue Mountains National Park. To get there, take the Katoomba exit from the Great Western Highway. Turn into Katoomba Street and follow it to the end

Road access: Sealed road - 2WD vehicles.

Facilities: carpark, drinking water, lookout, flush toilets, trackhead/access point


Events, activities and alerts at this location
School excursion

World Heritage Blue Mountains National Park

The Three Sisters,  Blue Mountains National Park (Image: Steve Alton/OEH)Location: Blue Mountains National Park is right at Sydney’s doorstep. It is part of the Greater Blue Mountains World Heritage Area that protects one million hectares of bushland and wilderness recognised for its exceptional flora and fauna, landscape and ecological diversity and for its cultural significance for six Aboriginal language groups. Blue Mountains National Park protects an ancient landscape of vertical cliffs, high plateaux, windswept heath, rainforest, waterfalls and rare and ancient plants. There is a network of heritage walking tracks and trails that take extraordinary advantage of the landscape.

Objectives

Students will:

  • discover why the Blue Mountains is listed as a World Heritage site
  • explore a diversity of ecosystems, including rainforests and wet and dry open forests
  • describe the geographical processes that form and transform this environment
  • describe the interrelationships between people, including traditional owners and the environment
  • understand park management strategies of the area
  • describe the operation of a simple ecosystem
  • construct a sketch map (optional)
  • use the points of a compass to determine direction (optional)
  • identify physical and cultural features on a map (optional)
  • use a topographic map (optional).

 Program outline

  • Welcome, introductions, safety briefing – 15 min
  • Descend into the rainforest – 45 min
  • Return via the Round Walk loop to Katoomba Falls Kiosk – 60 min
  • Or descend the Furber Steps -30 min
  • Return via Scenic Railway or Cableway (at additional cost) – 20 min
  • Finish outside Scenic World, Katoomba – 10 min

Difficulty: medium difficulty

Park: Echo Point lookout (Three Sisters) (Blue Mountains National Park)

Meeting place: Katoomba Falls Kiosk, 102B Cliff Drive Katoomba (opposite the caravan park).

Cost: From $12 per student including GST (plus one-way Scenic Railway or Cableway ticket if applicable)

More info: School excursion inquiries - Blue Mountains, Phone: 02 4784 7301 (Mon/Tue/Thu/Fri)

2 hours, Tuesday to Friday during school term

Evans lookout

A brilliant introduction to the wonders of Blue Mountains National Park, Evans lookout offers breathtaking views over Grose Valley. Located near Blackheath, it’s a perfect day trip from Sydney, and a great base for adventurous bushwalkers who want to get amongst it.

Take in the clear mountain air as you unpack the picnic hamper. You’ll be able to see the line of Govetts Creek winding its way through the expansive valley floor.

After fuelling up, step out on the challenging Cliff Top walking track along the valley rim to Govetts Leap lookout. For the chance to experience canyoning, without the need for all the gear, try Grand Canyon track.

Drop into Blue Mountains Heritage Centre to find out more about the mountains and enjoy the views above Govetts Leap waterfall.

Activities: birdwatching, walking, picnicking, playing and socialising

Getting there: Evans lookout is in the northern precinct of Blue Mountains National Park.

To get there:

  • Turn right off Great Western Highway into Evans Lookout Road near Blackheath
  • Continue along Evans Lookout Road, following the signs to Evans lookout.

Road access: Sealed road - 2WD vehicles.

Facilities: picnic tables, carpark, drinking water, lookout, non-flush toilets, trackhead/access point

Glenbrook - Nepean lookout

Millions of years ago, the river etched a path through the sandstone, creating the magnificent Fairlight Gorge. Today, you can admire the resulting landscape and scenic mountain views from Glenbrook - Nepean lookout, in Blue Mountains National Park. It’s a great pit stop on a car touring sightseeing trip to the scenic Glenbrook area.

A short and easy track leads to the unfenced lookout where you can gaze down the steep tree-lined gorge on your left and Nepean River on the right. Admire the magnificent angophoras, with distinctive salmon-coloured bark that grow nearby. Spring is a fabulous time to visit as the surrounding heath erupts with colour and fragrance. This is a birdwatcher’s paradise, with silvereyes, thornbills and striated pardalotes often seen flitting among the trees.

Pull out the thermos for a cuppa as you take in the panoramic views. While in the Glenbrook area, why not check out the fascinating Aboriginal stencil art at Red Hands Cave or challenge yourself by taking Jack Evans walking track down to Erskine Creek.

Activities: picnicking, playing and socialising

Getting there: Glenbrook – Nepean lookout is in the Glenbrook precinct of Blue Mountains National Park. To get there:

  • From Glenbrook, follow the signs via Ross Street and then Bruce Road
  • After entering the park follow The Oaks trail across Glenbrook Gorge and continue
  • Turn left into Nepean Lookout trail and follow to the end.

Road access: Unsealed road/trail - 2WD vehicles.

Opening hours: Nepean lookout, in the Glenbrook area of Blue Mountains National Park, is:

  • Open 8.30am – 7pm (Monday – Sunday during daylight savings time)
  • Open 8.30am – 6pm (Monday – Sunday during non-daylight savings time)

Facilities: carpark, lookout

Gordon Falls lookout and picnic area

Wheelchair access: medium

  • Medium - Assistance may be required to access this area.
  • The parking and picnic area is wheelchair friendly, however there are a number of steps to the lookout.

For some of the most incredible views in NSW, you can’t go past Gordon Falls lookout and picnic area in Blue Mountains National Park, near Leura. With sweeping views, excellent birdwatching, bush walking and a playground for the kids, there’s something for everyone, making it a popular spot for a family day-trip.

From the lookout, the waterfall plunges over a 200m drop. Gaze across to the impressive views of Mount Solitary and Kings Tableland. While taking in the magnificent panorama, look to the skies for peregrine falcons, circling high on valley thermals. Closer to ground, lyrebirds are often seen foraging in the forest litter.

Grab the camera for some family snaps to add to the photo album, before enjoying a relaxing picnic. If you’re keen to stretch your legs, there’s no shortage of walks including Lyrebird Dell - Pool of Siloam.

Activities: walking, picnicking, playing and socialising, birdwatching

Location:  shown on Leura map

Getting there: Gordon Falls lookout and picnic area is in the Leura precinct of Blue Mountains National Park. To get there:

  • Drive west from Sydney on the Great Western Highway
  • Turn into Leura and follow Leura Mall, turn left into Olympian Parade and follow to the intersection with Lone Pine Avenue.
  • Gordon Falls lookout is located at the end of Olympian Parade

Road access: Sealed road - 2WD vehicles.

Facilities: picnic tables, carpark, lookout, flush toilets, trackhead/access point

Govetts Leap lookout

Wheelchair access: medium

Assistance may be required to access this area

Once you clap your eyes on the view from Govetts Leap you’ll know why it’s one of the most famous lookouts in Australia. The magnificent waterfall drops a whopping 180m to the base of the cliff. The ‘ozone-laden’ air of the Blue Mountains was promoted as a health tonic since the early 1800s, and when you get there, you’ll realise why.

If you’re not mesmerised by the dancing waves of water spray, you’ll be transfixed by the sweeping views down the valley to the Grose Wilderness. Early bushwalkers saved this rare patch of majestic mountain blue gums for future generations. Keep your eyes peeled for the vibrant king parrot and listen for the ‘weela weela’ cry of the yellow tailed black cockatoo.

If you’re inspired to explore the park further, try one of the nearby walks or head to Blue Mountains Heritage Centre.

Activities: walking, picnicking, playing and socialising, birdwatching

Location:  shown on Blackheath map

Getting there: Govetts Leap lookout is in the northern precinct of Blue Mountains National Park.

To get there:

  • Turn right off Great Western Highway, at Blackheath traffic lights, into Govetts Leap Road.
  • Drive for 2.5km. After passing through the park entrance, follow the signs to Govetts Leap lookout.

Road access: Sealed road - 2WD vehicles.

Facilities: picnic tables, carpark, non-flush toilets, drinking water, lookout, trackhead/access point


Events, activities and alerts at this location
School excursion

World Heritage Blue Mountains National Park

The Three Sisters in Blue Mountains National Park (Image: DECCW)Location: Blue Mountains National Park is right at Sydney’s doorstep. It is part of the Greater Blue Mountains World Heritage Area that protects one million hectares of bushland and wilderness recognised for its exceptional flora and fauna, landscape and ecological diversity and for its cultural significance for six Aboriginal language groups. Blue Mountains National Park protects an ancient landscape of vertical cliffs, high plateaux, windswept heath, rainforest, waterfalls and rare and ancient plants. There is a network of heritage walking tracks and trails that take extraordinary advantage of the landscape.

Objectives

Students will:

  • discover why the Blue Mountains is listed as a World Heritage site
  • understand the responsibility of levels of government to the site
  • explore a diverse woodland ecosystem and views into the Grose Valley
  • describe the geographical processes that form and transform this environment
  • describe the interrelationships between people, including traditional owners and the environment
  • understand park management strategies
  • explain how current management strategies are contributing to the sustainability of the Blue Mountains
  • describe the operation of a simple ecosystem 
  • construct a sketch map (optional)
  • use the points of a compass to determine direction (optional)
  • identify physical and cultural features on a map (optional)
  • use a topographic map (optional).

 Program outline

  • Welcome, introductions and safety briefing – 15 min
  • Guided interpretive bushwalk along the Fairfax Track – 90 min
  • Prince Phillip Lookout – 10 min
  • Finish at Govetts Leap Lookout – 5 min

Difficulty: easy

Park: Blue Mountains National Park

Locations: Fairfax Heritage walking track, Govetts Leap lookout

Meeting place: National Parks and Wildlife Service Blackheath Heritage Centre, end of Govetts Leap Rd, Blackheath.

Cost: $12 per student including GST

More info: School excursion inquiries - Blue Mountains, Phone: 02 4784 7301 (Mon/Tue/Thu/Fri)

2 hours, Tuesday to Friday during school term

Leura Cascades picnic area

You’ll feel like you’re on the edge of the world as you gaze across Jamieson Valley from Leura Cascades picnic area. A reviving break while on a driving holiday or cycling trip, it’s also a great base for exploring the dramatic cliffs in the southern section of Blue Mountains National Park.

With a picture perfect backdrop, why not make the most of the opportunity and assemble the family for a group photo? Tuck into a leisurely lunch as you memorise the magnificent views.

Lie back in the shade and be serenaded by the gentle tinkering of the nearby waterfalls and local birdlife. You might hear the distinct call of the bell miner or the mimicking song of the lyrebird here.

The nearby Fern Bower circuit walk is a heart-pumper, or if you’re after a leisurely stroll, follow the track downstream to the top of Bridal Veil Falls or take the Prince Henry Cliff Walk east towards Gordon Falls Lookout.

Activities: walking, birdwatching, picnicking, playing and socialising

Location:  shown on Leura map

Getting there: Leura Cascades picnic area is in the Leura precinct of Blue Mountains National Park. To get there, turn off Great Western Highway at Leura into Cliff Drive.

Road access: Sealed road - 2WD vehicles.

Facilities: picnic tables, non-flush toilets, carpark, lookout, trackhead/access point

Mount Portal lookout

Wheelchair access: easy

  • This area is fully wheelchair-accessible
  • There is a short, all access path to the lookout

Perched atop the lower ridges of Blue Mountains National Park, Mount Portal lookout offers magnificent views of the junction between Glenbrook Gorge and the mighty Nepean River. With a wheelchair-accessible path, it’s a perfect pit stop on a car tour or a base for more adventurous thrill seekers who love abseiling and climbing.

Gazing across the dramatic tree-lined gorge to the water, you’ll see how the grand sweep of Nepean River opens up to the Cumberland Plains on the western edge of Sydney. Evidence that the ridge top was an ancient river bed can be found in the large rounded pebbles, called lapstones.

The shapely angophoras, with their elegantly contorted limbs, thrive in this rugged terrain and bearded dragons are often seen sunning themselves on the surrounding rocky outcrops.

If you’re keen to explore the region further, check out the unique Aboriginal art at Red Hands Cave or stay overnight at Euroka campground.

Activities: walking, picnicking, playing and socialising, birdwatching

Location:  shown on Glenbrook map

Getting there: Mount Portal lookout is in the Glenbrook precinct of Blue Mountains National Park. To get there, follow the signs from Great Western Highway. The main entrance to the park is through Glenbrook via Ross Street and then Bruce Road.

Road access: Unsealed road/trail - 2WD vehicles.

Opening hours: Mount Portal lookout, in the Glenbrook area of Blue Mountains National Park, is:

  • Open 8:30am – 7pm (Monday – Sunday during daylight savings time)
  • Open 8:30am – 6pm (Monday – Sunday during non-daylight savings time)

Facilities: lookout

Mount Werong campground

The Colong region is one of the most diverse in the Greater Blue Mountains World Heritage area. Discover a rugged landscape rich in tall forests, wildlife, rock types and both Aboriginal and European heritage. Mount Werong campground is a great base to explore by 4WD, on foot or mountain bike, and a popular destination for history buffs and families alike.

The nearby stone hut harks back to early pioneering life, and you can explore old mine remnants along Ruby Creek walking track. Discover the mining history of nearby Yerranderie Private Town along 4WD Oberon Colong historic stock route.

The Colong area is the traditional lands of the Gundungurra people and is rich with evidence of occupation including Aboriginal rock art sites, historic campsites and grinding grooves.At night, settle in around the campfire and enjoy an evening beneath a blanket of stars. You might hear the cry of the powerful owl echoing through the darkness.

Activities: astronomy and star gazing, birdwatching, picnicking, playing and socialising, camping

Getting there: Mount Werong campground is in the southern precinct of Blue Mountains National Park. To get there:

  • Start at Oberon on Edith Road, then turn right after 8km onto Butter Factory Lane, which leads onto Shooters Hill Road.
  • Turn left onto Mount Werong Road (also known as Colong Oberon historic stock route) and follow this unsealed road for approx 10km from the entrance to the park.

NB: No immediate access to/from Sydney, only via Goulburn/Oberon areas:

  • Please note no access is available from Sydney's west through Burragorang Valley from East Picton/Oakdale, and there is no access through the valley from the west, in an easterly direction from Yerranderie. Schedule 1 protected water catchment access restrictions ensure Sydney’s water quality and prevent any access through this area.
  • Please be aware that many commercially available online mapping and GPS navigation devices do not have this information listed within, and following these without first programming Goulburn or Oberon as an initial destination will cause navigational issues.

Road access: Unsealed road/trail - 2WD vehicles.

Facilities: picnic tables, fire rings (bring your own firewood), carpark, lookout, trackhead/access point, wood barbecues (bring your own firewood), non-flush toilets, drinking water

Bookings: Contact the Blue Mountains NPWS office on (02) 4787 8877

No bookings are taken for this campground.

Contact: Oberon, Phone: 02 6336 1972

Mount Wilson - Mt Banks lookouts

The views from Mount Banks are magnificent, offering a different perspective on the landmarks around Blackheath and Katoomba. To see them, you'll need to walk the Mount Banks Track.


Events, activities and alerts at this location
Commercial activity

Australian School of Mountaineering

ASM is Australia's longest established and most experienced adventure school and guiding company. ASM is based in the Blue Mountains, one of the world's most outstanding wilderness areas, containing thousands of square kilometres of rainforest, canyons, plateaus and sandstone cliff-line.

We offer a huge range of the finest guided adventures, tours and outdoor technical courses in abseiling, rockclimbing, canyoning, and wilderness navigation, all conducted in the spectacular Blue Mountains, as well as mountaineering and snow camping in the Snowy Mountains in winter.

More info: Australian School of Mountaineering, Phone: 02 4782 2014 (international +612 4782 2014)

As required

Perrys lookdown

When it’s time to clear your head and leave the city behind, head for the rustic charm of Perrys lookdown, near Blackheath. Gaze across the scenic Grose Valley while taking in that famous crisp mountain air of Blue Mountains National Park.

From the lookout, you’ll see the imposing sandstone cliffs of Mount Banks, while the towering stand of eucalypts rising from the valley floor is the historic Blue Gum Forest, saved by bushwalkers almost a hundred years ago. While you’re relishing the expansive views, look for yellow-tailed cockatoos and wedge-tailed eagles in the sky above.

If you find it too hard to leave, unroll the sleeping bag and stay overnight at Perrys lookdown campground. If you’re feeling adventurous, head down into the valley along Perrys lookdown to Blue Gum Forest walking track for an invigorating hike through unspoilt wilderness.

Activities: walking, astronomy and star gazing, motor vehicle use, picnicking, playing and socialising, birdwatching

Getting there: Perrys lookdown is in the northern precinct of Blue Mountains National park. To get there:

  • Take the Great Western Highway to Blackheath
  • Turn east into Hat Hill Road and follow the signs to Perrys lookdown.

Road access: Unsealed road/trail - 2WD vehicles.

Facilities: carpark, lookout, non-flush toilets, trackhead/access point

Perrys lookdown campground

You’ll be pitching your tent on a prime spot at Perrys lookdown campground on the western edge of Blue Mountains National Park. Take in the inspiring views of the famous Blue Gum Forest from Perrys lookdown as you whisper a thank you to the bushwalkers of the 1930s. They bought and reclaimed this magnificent stand of towering eucalypts for future generations.

Gaze across the heath-covered plateaus to the huge sandstone walls of Mount Banks rising majestically from the dense forests below. Be sure to bring your binoculars for a closer view of the cliffs as well as birdlife including the colourful king parrots and crimson rosellas.

If you’re keen to get down to Blue Gum Forest in the Grose Valley, there’s the nearby challenging Perrys lookdown to Blue Gum Forest walking track.

Activities: walking, birdwatching, picnicking, playing and socialising

Location:  shown on Blackheath map

Getting there: Perrys lookdown campground is in the northern precinct of Blue Mountains National park. To get there:

  • Take the Great Western Highway to Blackheath
  • Turn east into Hat Hill Road and follow the signs to Perrys lookdown.

Road access: Unsealed road/trail - 2WD vehicles.

Facilities: non-flush toilets, carpark, lookout, trackhead/access point

Bookings: No booking is required

Contact: Blue Mountains (Blackheath), Phone: (02) 4787 8877

Pulpit Rock lookout

If you’ve got something to shout about, then head for Pulpit Rock lookout near Blackheath in Blue Mountains National Park. Jutting out on a dramatic blade of rock, you might be lost for words or end up singing the praises of the sweeping views of vast forested gorges and magnificent Grose Valley below.

Unpack the picnic basket and enjoy a remote lunch on this isolated pinnacle, far from the popular tourist spots. There are several lookouts from this prime position, affording an almost 360˚ panorama across the dramatic cliff lines to Mount Banks and distant mountains.

The lookout is a great pit stop on a mountain biking tour or starting point for Pulpit walking track along the cliff tops to Govetts Leap lookout. For a range of walks to suit everyone, check out the nearby Blue Mountains Heritage Centre.

Activities: walking, mountain biking, road cycling, motor vehicle use, birdwatching

Getting there: Pulpit Rock lookout is in the northern precinct of Blue Mountains National Park.

To get there:

  • Turn right off Great Western Highway, at Blackheath, into Hat Hill Road.
  • Continue along Hat Hill Road, following the signs to Pulpit Rock lookout.
  • The lookout is a short 400m walk from the carpark

Road access: Unsealed road/trail - 2WD vehicles.

Facilities: carpark, lookout, trackhead/access point

Sublime Point lookout - Leura

Wheelchair access: medium

  • The track to the lookout is ideal for wheelchairs and strollers, and ends at a picnic area. However the steps to the lookout are not accessible by wheelchair.

It will feel like you’re on the edge of the world as the views go on forever at Sublime Point lookout – Leura, in Blue Mountains National Park. Offering sensational scenic views of the Jamison Valley, it’s a popular spot for picnicking and birdwatching with families. The more adventurous know it as a haven for rock climbing.

Following an easy track, look for gang-gangs and cockatoos feeding in the casuarinas during summer. You’ll cross a bridge over a dramatic ravine before arriving at the lookout platform.

Gaze across the scenic valley views and soak up the unending wilderness. You’ll get a different viewpoint on Katoomba and the extended family of The Three Sisters. On a misty morning, Mount Solitary rising out of the clouds is a magnificent sight.

The sheer cliffs attract experienced rock climbers, who are often seen tackling climbs such as ‘Hells Bells’ and ‘Sweet Dreams’.

Activities: walking, climbing, birdwatching, picnicking, playing and socialising

Getting there: Sublime Point is in the Leura precinct of Blue Mountains National Park. To get there:

  • Take Great Western Highway west to Leura and turn into Leura Mall.
  • Turn left onto Craigend Street just past Leura township, turn right and follow to Gladstone Road.
  • Turn right into Gladstone Road and follow to Watkins Road which joins Sublime Point Road, just near the Fairmont Resort entrance.
  • Follow Sublime Point Road to the carpark at the end of the road.

Road access: Sealed road - 2WD vehicles.

Facilities: picnic tables, carpark, lookout

Three Sisters - Honeymoon Bridge

Fire/closure alerts currently apply to this location. See details below.

For over a hundred years, honeymooners have been flocking to this famous spot to create a photo for the mantlepiece. Whether you’re on a romantic getaway or a family day trip, you’ll fall in love with the spectacular views and fresh mountain air from Honeymoon Bridge, near Echo Point lookout.

Accessed via the Giant Stairway near the visitor centre, take in the panoramic views over Jamison Valley. You’ll experience one of the most iconic views there is, with the legendary Three Sisters rising near a kilometre above sea level, within reach. It’s a perfect opportunity to assemble your nearest and dearest for a great photo for the family album or living room wall.

If you’re feeling energetic, there are plenty of walks to choose from, including Prince Henry Cliff walk, tracing the nearby cliffs. Roll out the rug at Wentworth Falls picnic area to round off a beautiful day in the mountains.

Activities: astronomy and star gazing, birdwatching, sightseeing, photography

Location:  shown on Katoomba - Echo Point map

Getting there: Echo Point is in the Katoomba precinct of Blue Mountains National Park. To get there, take the Katoomba exit from Great Western Highway. Turn into Katoomba Street and follow it to the end.

Road access: Sealed road - 2WD vehicles.


Events, activities and alerts at this location
Closure

Three Sisters walking track closure

Three Sisters track will be closed from Echo Point to the start of the Giant Stairway for major upgrade works to improve facilities for visitors. Works will commence from Monday 24 November 2014 and will be ongoing for the next 6 months. Access to the Giant Stairway, and Prince Henry Cliff walk to Leura is open. For more information, please contact the Blue Mountains Heritage Centre on (02) 4787 8877 or visit the NSW National Parks safety page.

Tunnel View lookout

Wheelchair access: hard

  • Wheelchairs can access this area with some difficulty

With marvellous views across to Glenbrook and as far as Kurrajong, almost 50km away, Tunnel View lookout is a great destination for sweeping valley vistas, birdwatching and wildflowers. Situated in the Glenbrook region of Blue Mountains National Park, it’s a popular lookout for all ages and harbours a special treat for train buffs.

From the unfenced lookout, gaze across to train-line cutting and you’ll see the two historic tunnels, constructed in 1911. Beyond all this, look for the basalt capped mountains of Mount Banks and Mount Tomah.

In the warmer months you’ll see the creamy spikes of the woody pears as well as the delicate white blossoms of the flannel flower. In May, mixed feeding flocks of migrating red wattlebirds, honey eaters and noisy friarbirds congregate around here.

You can round off your day-trip in the Glenbrook region with Glenbrook - Nepean lookout and perhaps a dip at the pool along Jellybean track.

Activities: walking, mountain biking, motor vehicle use, birdwatching

Location:  shown on Glenbrook map

Getting there: Tunnel View lookout is in the Glenbrook precinct of Blue Mountains National Park. To get there:

  • Follow the signs from Great Western Highway to Glenbrook, via Ross Street and Bruce road.
  • Tunnel View is 5.5km from the entrance gate

Road access: Unsealed road/trail - 2WD vehicles.

Opening hours: Tunnel View lookout, in the Glenbrook region of Blue Mountains National Park, is:

  • Open 8:30am – 7pm (Monday – Sunday during daylight savings)
  • Open 8:30am – 6pm (Monday – Sunday the rest of the year)

Facilities: lookout

Valley of the Waters picnic area

Valley of the Waters picnic area, just near Conservation Hut in Blue Mountains National Park, is a fabulous picnicking spot for family and friends wanting an extra helping of scenic views with their lunch. With plenty of active options and nearby wheelchair-accessible facilities, it’s a no-fuss day trip that all the family will love.

You might be serenaded by bellbirds as you unroll the picnic rug among the scribbly gums. If you’re feeling energetic, there’s the heart-pumping Wentworth Pass loop walking track. However, if a leisurely stroll is more your style, walk along the cliff top to Wentworth Falls lookout for sensational waterfall views.

After an afternoon of exploring the enchanting falls of Valley of the Waters, you might be tempted to round up the gang for a delicious Devonshire tea at the ‘Hut’.

Activities: birdwatching, picnics and barbecues

Getting there: Valley of the Waters picnic area is near Conservation Hut in Blue Mountains National Park. To get there, take Great Western Highway to Wentworth Falls. Turn left onto Falls Road and right onto Fletcher Street. You'll find the carpark at the end of Fletcher Street.

Road access: Sealed road - 2WD vehicles.

Facilities: picnic tables, cafe/kiosk, carpark, drinking water, lookout, flush toilets, trackhead/access point

Wentworth Falls - The Conservation Hut

This lookout is a good place to start many of the longer walks in the Wentworth Falls area, which will take you down into the Jamison Valley for a different perspective.

Wentworth Falls - various lookouts

The walking tracks around Wentworth Falls picnic area lead you to a variety of lookout spots, including Princes Rock Lookout, Weeping Rock and Jamison Lookout. You'll see the waterfall itself and, below, the Jamison Valley stretching away towards Mount Solitary.

Wentworth Falls picnic area

Wheelchair access: easy

This area is fully wheelchair-accessible. There are wheelchair-accessible toilets and designated parking.

You'll feel on top of the world at this picture perfect spot with world-class views, near Wentworth Falls, in Blue Mountains National Park. Wentworth Falls picnic area is a great base to explore the lush world of rainforests and waterfalls along a range of spectacular walking tracks to suit all the family.

There's room for the kids to play as you unroll the picnic blanket at this scenic clifftop spot. The fresh mountain air will pique your appetite, so enjoy a hearty lunch among the banksias and gum trees. Be sure to check out Weeping Rock and Fletchers lookout tracks for some of the best scenic views and waterfalls in Blue Mountains National Park.

If you're after a post-lunch stroll, choose from the leisurely Charles Darwin walk to the medium Overcliff-Undercliff track. An ideal area for birdwatching, you might hear riotous flocks of sulphur-crested cockatoos or glimpse a rare peregrine falcon cruising the valley thermals.

Activities: picnics and barbecues

Location:  shown on Wentworth Falls map

Getting there: Wentworth Falls picnic area is in the Wentworth Falls precinct of Blue Mountains National Park. To get there from Great Western Highway, turn left at Falls Road near Wentworth Falls and the picnic area is at the end of the street.

Road access: Sealed road - 2WD vehicles.

Facilities: picnic tables, gas/electric barbecues (free), flush toilets, drinking water, carpark, lookout, trackhead/access point


Events, activities and alerts at this location
School excursion

Places: Then, Now and Tomorrow

The Three Sisters,  Blue Mountains National Park (Image: Steve Alton/OEH)Location: Blue Mountains National Park is right at Sydney’s doorstep. It is part of the Greater Blue Mountains World Heritage Area that protects one million hectares of bushland and wilderness recognised for its exceptional flora and fauna, landscape and ecological diversity and for its cultural significance for six Aboriginal language groups. Blue Mountains National Park protects an ancient landscape of vertical cliffs, high plateaux, windswept heath, rainforest, waterfalls and rare and ancient plants. There is a network of heritage walking tracks and trails that take extraordinary advantage of the landscape.

Objectives

Students will:

  • explore significant natural and heritage features in the Blue Mountains National Park
  • discuss who the traditional Aboriginal owners were of the Blue Mountains
  • identify animal and plant life that may have provided food for Aboriginal and European people
  • understand the different perspectives and use of the natural environment of the Blue Mountains by Aboriginal people and Europeans
  • research if you would drink the water in the creeks
  • identify why remnant vegetation is vital to biodiversity
  • answer the question, "Have you ever been to a national park?"
  • understand what is a National Park, its rules and how it is managed
  • identify what you can and cannot do in a National Park
  • identify threatened flora and fauna species in Blue Mountains National Park
  • discuss issues and threats to Blue Mountains National Park
  • meet and listen to Rangers who work in the park and their responsibilities.

Program outline

  • Welcome, introductions, safety briefing - 15min
  • Descend to Princes Rock Lookout - 15min
  • Guided interpretive bushwalk along Undercliff Track - 45min
  • Experience the top of Wentworth Falls - 15min
  • Return to Wentworth Falls Picnic Area - 30min

Difficulty: medium difficulty

Park: Wentworth Falls picnic area (Blue Mountains National Park)

Meeting place: Wentworth Falls Picnic Area, end of Falls Rd, Wentworth Falls.

Cost: $12 per student including GST

More info: School excursion inquiries - Blue Mountains, Phone: 02 4784 7301 (Mon/Tue/Thu/Fri)

2 hours, Tuesday to Friday during school term
School excursion

What is a National Park?

Wentworth Falls waterfall, Blue Mountains National Park (Image: www.wildwildworld.com.au)Location: Blue Mountains National Park is right at Sydney’s doorstep. It is part of the Greater Blue Mountains World Heritage Area that protects one million hectares of bushland and wilderness recognised for its exceptional flora and fauna, landscape and ecological diversity and for its cultural significance for six Aboriginal language groups. Blue Mountains National Park protects an ancient landscape of vertical cliffs, high plateaux, windswept heath, rainforest, waterfalls and rare and ancient plants. There is a network of heritage walking tracks and trails that take extraordinary advantage of the landscape.

Objectives

Students will:

  • answer the question, "Have you ever been to a national park?"
  • explore a World Heritage National park
  • understand what is a National Park, its rules and how it is managed
  • identify what you can and cannot do in a National Park
  • identify threatened flora and fauna species in Blue Mountains National Park
  • discuss issues and threats to Blue Mountains National Park
  • meet and listen to Rangers who work in the park and their responsibilities
  • explore significant natural and heritage features in the National Park
  • identify the traditional Aboriginal owners of the area
  • identify responsible ways of interacting with the National Park environment
  • understand why the Blue Mountains should be cared for
  • acknowledge that Aboriginal people have a special relationship with the land.

Program outline

  • Welcome, introductions, safety briefing - 15min
  • Descend to Princes Rock Lookout - 15min
  • Guided interpretive bushwalk along Undercliff Track - 45min
  • Experience the top of Wentworth Falls - 15min
  • Return to Wentworth Falls Picnic Area - 30min

Difficulty: medium difficulty

Park: Wentworth Falls picnic area (Blue Mountains National Park)

Meeting place: Wentworth Falls Picnic Area, end of Falls Rd, Wentworth Falls.

Cost: From $12 per student including GST

More info: School excursion inquiries - Blue Mountains, Phone: 02 4784 7301 (Mon/Tue/Thu/Fri)

2 hours, Tuesday to Friday during school term

Scenic roads, tracks and trails

Grand Circular Tourist Drive - 260km

Car touring

General information

This road travels from Sydney up through the mountains along the Great Western Highway, then loops back via the Bells Line of Road. You'll see signs at Glenbrook Tourist Centre and Kurrajong Heights.

From Sydney, take the M4 Motorway out of the city and follow the Great Western Highway up the mountains from Lapstone. The highway and railway line follow the route of the first European explorers who found a way across the mountains in 1813, opening the rich plains and mineral fields west of the mountains to European settlement.

A great place to start your exploration of the Blue Mountains is the Heritage Centre at Blackheath. Near Govetts Leap Lookout, the centre features an educational display on the wildlife, Aboriginal and European history, and geology of the mountains. You can pick up brochures, maps, walking guides, Australian-made souvenirs and lots of free advice. You can also make bookings for Discovery walks, talks and tours here.

From Blackheath, you have plenty of options. Will you try one of the many scenic and historic walking tracks? Will you go on a tour of the park's many spectacular lookouts for dress-circle views of dramatic sandstone cliffs, plunging waterfalls, and the continual processes of erosion and weathering? Will you relax and enjoy a picnic in one of the sunny glades?

Maybe you could combine several of these activities with a glimpse of what life was like in the developing colony of New South Wales. Drive another 15 kilometres along the Great Western Highway from Blackheath to the 19th-century village of Hartley, at the base of the Victoria Pass (this is a steep descent). Visit the information centre and heritage shop in the former Farmers Inn (open daily, 10 am to 1 pm, 2.00 pm to 4.30 pm) and join a guided tour of the courthouse, built in 1837. For more details, contact the Hartley information centre by email or phone 02 6355 2117.

From Mt Victoria the Bells Line of Road loops back to Sydney, passing by Mt Tomah Botanic Gardens and Wollemi National Park on its way to the historic townships of Richmond and Windsor.

Lookouts and scenery: events and activities

Commercial activity

Activity Tours Australia

Three Sisters in Blue MountainsBe transported from the centre of Sydney into the heart of the enchanting Blue Mountains.

Visit Featherdale Wildlife Park to see kangaroos and koalas up close, take in the view at Echo Point and see the famous Three Sisters at Katoomba.

We offer great prices, experienced and friendly guides, award-winning tours plus complimentary pick-ups and returns for most city hotels.

Tailored private charters are very popular for different group sizes.

Compare the prices and don't miss out on this enjoyable tour when visiting Australia.

More info: Activity Tours Australia, Phone: 02 4227 9902 (international +612 4227 9902)

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Commercial activity

All About Australia Tours

We promote Sydney and its surrounding natural beauty to international visitors. We believe that personalised service makes an experience more memorable. Our small groups take the time to enjoy the views and to have their many questions answered by their attentive and knowledgeable tour guide. Our clients enjoy the sights, sounds and flavours of Australia. We are the specialist for French-speaking tours and also offer tours in Spanish, Portuguese, Italian and English.

Join us for a day to the World Heritage Blue Mountains National Park or contact us for many more destinations in your language. We look forward to sharing the beauty of Australia with you!

More info: All About Australia Tours, Phone: 02 8033 2876 (international +612 8033 2876)

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