Management plan for cane toads in national parks and reserves 2012

This plan outlines how cane toads will be managed in national parks and reserves in New South Wales in keeping with the goals of containment and asset protection.

Date
1 November 2013
Publisher
Office of Environment and Heritage
Type
Publication, Management plan
Status
Final
Cost
Free
Language
English
Tags
  • ISBN 978-1-74293-393-1
  • ID OEH20130772
  • File PDF 0.8MB
  • Pages 23
  • Name management-plan-for-cane-toads-in-national-parks-reserves-2012-130772.pdf

Cane toads Bufo marinus were introduced into northern Queensland from South America in 1935 as a biological control for the cane beetle, an agricultural pest of sugar cane. Cane toads have since spread west into the Northern Territory and the top end of Western Australia and south into northern NSW. Their spread in northern NSW was aided by further releases near Byron Bay and Ballina in the 1960s.

Cane toads are now widespread in north-east NSW north of Evans Head, with small isolated populations occurring further south, including at Angourie and Brooms Head near Yamba and at Taren Point near Sydney. Cane toads are also approaching the border in north-west NSW via the Murray–Darling and Lake Eyre basins in Queensland.

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