Nature conservation

Biodiversity Reform

Channel Country - conservation status analysis

This page shows the conservation status of the bioregion, based on protection of landscapes within formal conservation management mechanisms.

Landscape-scale conservation

Although the Channel Country Bioregion is composed of 14 landscapes (Mitchell in prep), almost 90 per cent of the bioregion is dominated by 5 landscapes. These are:

  • the Tibooburra Downs landscape occupying 433,730.44 hectares or 30.34 per cent of the bioregion;
  • the Tibooburra Tablelands landscape occupying 244,165.93 hectares or 17.08 per cent of the bioregion;
  • the Bulloo Littoral and Lunettes landscape, occupying 242,539.58 hectares or 16.97 per cent of the bioregion;
  • the Tibooburra Alluvial Plains landscape, occupying 178,746.80 hectares or 12.50 per cent of the bioregion; and
  • the Bulloo Channels and Floodouts landscape, occupying 175,111.96 hectares or 12.25 per cent of the bioregion.

The size of landscapes in the bioregion ranges from the Tibooburra Fresh Lakes and Swamps landscape, which occupies the smallest area at 1.29 hectares or 0.0001 per cent of the bioregion, to the Tibooburra Downs landscape, the largest, which occupies about 30.34 per cent or 433,730 hectares of the bioregion.

National parks and nature reserves

Just under half of the landscapes (6) occur in national parks and nature reserves. Two of these, the Tibooburra Downs landscape (with 108,530.88 hectares or 25.02 per cent of its bioregional area) and the Tibooburra Tablelands landscape (with 56,174.87 hectares or 23.01 per cent of its bioregional area) have greater than 20 per cent of their bioregional area reserved.

Wildlife refuges

While the length and scope of management of lands in wildlife refuges is likely to be variable, the wildlife refuge program in the Channel Country Bioregion contains a marginally wider representation of landscapes than in national parks or nature reserves. Nine of the bioregional landscapes - Tibooburra Downs, Tibooburra Tablelands, Bulloo Littoral and Lunettes, Tibooburra Alluvial Plains, Bulloo Channels and Floodouts, Tibooburra Sandplains, Tibooburra Ranges, Bulloo Salt Lakes and Playas and the Bulloo Linear Dunes - are represented in wildlife refuges.

Four of these landscapes are also reserved and 3 are also represented in the Aboriginal area but 2 are not represented in any other conservation mechanism. The area of 3 landscapes - Tibooburra Alluvial Plains (18.32 per cent of the bioregional area of landscape in wildlife refuge compared to 9.55 per cent in reserves), Tibooburra Sandplains (21.26 per cent bioregional area of landscape in wildlife refuge compared to 11.81 per cent in reserves) and Tibooburra Ranges (3.71 per cent in wildlife refuge compared to 1.22 per cent in reserves) included in wildlife refuges is greater than the area conserved in reserves.

Aboriginal area

Three bioregional landscapes occur in the Pindera Downs Aboriginal Area in the bioregion (572.25 hectares or 0.23 per cent of the Tibooburra Tablelands landscape, 2,259.88 hectares or 0.93 per cent of the Bulloo Littoral and Lunettes landscape and 6,555.02 hectares or 3.74 per cent of the Bulloo Channels and Floodouts landscape). Two of these - the Bulloo Littoral and Lunettes and the Bulloo Channels and Floodouts landscapes - are also represented in wildlife refuges but not in the reserves, with the Aboriginal area conserving the greatest area of the Bulloo Channels and Floodouts landscape.

Conservation and clearing

The only quantitative information on landscape condition available is on the presence or absence of native canopy and its representation in management regimes that have some conservation focus or capacity to conserve (State Conservation Monitoring Project). The native canopy of the vegetation of the Channel Country Bioregion has been identified as entirely intact. Despite this, protection of landscapes against future change in the bioregion is not comprehensive, with less than half represented in reserves and an additional 3 achieving only some representation in wildlife refuges or in the Aboriginal area.

Page last updated: 26 April 2016