Nature conservation

Biodiversity Reform

South East Corner - subregions

Subregions of the South East Corner Bioregion
SubregionGeologyCharacteristic landformsTypical soilsVegetation
Bateman Tightly folded fine grained Ordovician metamorphic rocks with several intrusions of granite. Western margin is a tight synclinal fold in Devonian sandstone and siltstone. Small areas of Tertiary basalt and quartz sands behind the coastal headlands. Quaternary alluvium on main valley floors and in the estuaries. Steep hills below the Great escarpment oriented north-south and controlled by rock structure. Lines of hills become lower toward the coast with a slight up turn along the coastal margin. Coastal barrier systems are small and estuarine fills limited. Mostly texture contrast soils. Red clay subsoils with thin topsoil on metamorphic rocks, deeper coarser grained profiles on granite. Red brown structured loams on basalt and deep siliceous sands with some podsol development on Tertiary sands and coastal dunes. Hakea, melaleuca, coast rosemary and dwarfed red bloodwood heath on headlands. Red bloodwood and spotted gum forests to 300 m. Yellow stringybark, grey ironbark and woollybutt to 550 m. Brown barrel, black ash, Sydney peppermint, large-fruited red mahogany, Sydney blue gum and monkey gum to 900 m, then snow gum.
East Gippsland Uplands Extensive areas of granite amongst Ordovician and Silurian metamorphosed sedimentary and volcanic rocks; slates, chert, quartzites. Gently folded red and purple Devonian sandstones and shales, limited areas of Tertiary basalt and sand deposits. Quaternary coastal sediments and small areas of alluvium. Very abrupt margin on the Great Escarpment. Deep gorges with rapids and waterfalls in the main streams including the lower Snowy River. Extensive subdued basin with rolling hills on the Bega granite with steep hillslopes at the contact aureole. Streams carry large volumes of sand to valley floors and estuaries. Small beach, dune, lagoon barrier systems. Coarse texture contrast soils on granite, thinner profiles on metamorphics with red and yellow clay subsoils.

 

 

Deep coarse sands in granite derived alluvium often deposited in swampy valley flats. Deep fine sands in dunes. Peaty sands in lagoons and swamps.

Red bloodwood and spotted gum forests to 300 m. Spotted gum less common in the south. Yellow stringybark, grey ironbark, black ash, yertchuk and woollybutt to 550 m. Brown barrel, black ash, large-fruited red mahogany, and monkey gum to 900 m, then snow gum.
East Gippsland Lowlands Granites in the head of the Genoa River. Small areas of Devonian sandstone overlain by Tertiary sands and Quaternary coastal dunes near Cape Howe. Low rounded coastal hills on granite, higher and steeper on Devonian sandstones. Beach, dune and lagoon barrier development on the main streams with dunes some distance inland at Cape Howe. Coarse texture contrast soils on granite, subject to high rates of erosion even under forest cover. Deep sands in dunes. Peaty sands in lagoons and swamps. Coastal sequence on dunes with thickets of coast tea-tree and sedge communities around swamps. Stunted black ash and red bloodwood clumps close to the coast becoming taller inland with bangalay, rough-barked apple, river peppermint, coast grey box, black she-oak and blue gum.


From Morgan 2001

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Page last updated: 18 April 2016