Monitoring dust

Submit an observation

Anyone can make an observation and help increase our understanding of wind erosion processes.

email icon

By email

Download and complete the report template (PDF, 16KB) and email to dustwatch@environment.nsw.gov.au.

email icon

By fax

Download and complete the report template report template (PDF, 16KB) and fax it to (02) 6742 3129.

post icon

By post

Download, complete and print the report template (PDF, 16KB) and post to OEH, DustWatch Mailbox, PO Box 20, Gunnedah NSW 2380.

Community volunteers

DustWatch volunteers are critical to help us learn more about wind erosion in Australia. They make observations of dust events using Bureau of Meteorology protocols for dust event type, visibility, wind direction and speed. They also report local conditions and suggest why there is dust in their area. Volunteers at instrumented sites or DustWatch Nodes (mainly in NSW) record dust events and help maintain instruments.

Nodes in southern Australia

DustWatch observations from CMA staff and community observers compliment the measurements of dust from instruments at 44 locations across southern Australia (DustWatch Nodes). The DustWatch Nodes are purchased and supported by a range of organisations and individuals.

The DustWatch Nodes are located at Birdsville, Bourke, Broken Hill, Buronga, Cobar, Condobolin, Coombah, Coonamble, Cowra, Deniliquin, Dubbo, Euston, Griffith, Gunnedah, Hay, Hillston, Ivanhoe, Junee, Kyalite, Lake Victoria, Lameroo, Loddon Plains, Menindee, Merredin, Minnipa, Moolawatana, Moree, Mullewa, Narrandera, Newdegate, Parkes, Penarie, Pooncarie, Rand, Temora, Tibooburra, Wagga Wagga, Walpeup, Walgett, West Wyalong, White Cliffs, Whycheproof and Willandra WHA.  

Locations south-eastern Australia

Map of DustWatch node locations in the South East

Map updated January 2015.

Locations in south-western Australia

DustWatch node locations in the South West

Map updated January 2015.

Was this page helpful?

Thank you for your feedback.

Would you like to tell us more?

Share this

Share to Facebook Share to Twitter More...
Page last updated: 12 January 2015