Project summaries - 2006 Environmental Research - seeding grants

2006 Environmental Research - seeding grants
OrganisationCategoryProject titleAmount $
University of Sydney

Waters and catchments

Biological control of algal blooms in Centennial Park

20,000

University of SydneyWaters and catchmentsEvaluating cost-effectiveness of reducing water pollution risks

19,909

University of Wollongong

Environmental NoiseDoes marine noise impact on invertebrate dispersal and settlement?

19,615

University of Wollongong

Waters and catchments

Community valuations of environmental quality in coastal lakes

11,000

4 projects 

TOTAL

$70,524

University of Sydney
Biological control of algal blooms in Centennial Park
Grant: $20,000

In NSW Microcystis aeruginosa and Anabaena circinalis account for the vast majority of toxic (fresh water) cyanobacteria blooms resulting in deterioration of water quality. In freshwater environments this can have detrimental effects on ecology, livestock, human water supply and recreational facilities. The use of algicides is a common method of control, but their use often causes environmental damage. Another possible alternative is the implementation of biological control. The aim of this project is to identify organisms which may control algal populations that cause blooms, and to assess their suitability as biological control agents.

University of Sydney
Evaluating cost-effectiveness of reducing water pollution risks
Grant: $19,909

Measuring environmental outcomes from various activities designed to curb water pollution from diffuse agricultural sources is difficult because of the complexity of the underlying processes. This created a serious impediment to environmental decision making in relation to reducing water pollution from agriculture. One way to deal with this difficulty is to acknowledge the uncertainty and to attempt to assess the impact that various abatement activities have on reducing the risk of water pollution from agriculture. This approach classifies various risks of water pollution in several classes and looks at how abatement activities in agriculture may reduce that risk. An important question remains as to how reduction in risk of water pollution from diffuse agricultural sources can be measured in monetary terms using the money metric. This project is aimed at putting together building blocks for a larger project that will attempt to fill this knowledge gap.

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University of Wollongong
Does marine noise impact on invertebrate dispersal and settlement?
Grant: $19,615

Noise in the marine environment is increasing due to coastal development, particularly activities associated with recreational boating and industrial shipping. Our study will use laboratory and field experiments to contribute to our understanding of the influence of natural and human noise on the dispersal and settlement of marine invertebrates to coastal marine habitats, which are key processes influencing their recruitment and population dynamics. We will determine the levels and types of noises that might affect the behaviour of a wide range of species and whether noise can influence marine biodiversity. The study will inform management practise about the use of noise in the marine environment and will potentially uncover novel antifouling or rehabilitation techniques.

University of Wollongong
Community valuations of environmental quality in coastal lakes
Grant: $11,000

The coastal lakes of southern NSW are an increasingly popular residential location under the 'sea change' phenomena, both for families and retirees, as permanent homes and for holidaymakers. This places lake management authorities under extreme pressure to undertake environmental quality improvements and restoration projects in all sites. Limited funding dictates that such projects should be subjected to benefit-cost analysis to ensure scarce public resources are assigned to their most valuable uses. However, environmental benefits are usually unpriced, making such objective decision-making difficult. This project utilises the hedonic pricing method to determine a community valuation of such improvements, by estimating the differential house prices in lake catchment areas that can be attributed to their location near these lakes. This value can then be used in benefit-cost studies of environmental projects as one element in allocating resources to such projects.

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Page last updated: 27 February 2011