Project summaries - Restoration and Rehabilitation government grants

July 2015 update

Two additional 2014 grants have been approved for projects involving State Heritage-listed properties. See project summary table below for more information on Maitland City Council's Weed control within an historical cemetery and quarry in Maitland and The Hills Shire Council's Restoration of Cumberland Plain Woodland at Bella Vista Farm Park.

2014 Environmental Restoration and Rehabilitation - government grants
OrganisationProject titleAmount $
Bathurst City Council Rehabilitation of Sawpit Creek

67,970

Coffs Harbour City Council Roberts Hill koala corridor restoration

91,250

CSIRO Biosecurity Flagship

Community-based biological control program for crofton weed in NSW

99,535

Eurobodalla Shire Council

Removing threats and improving resilience of Eurobodalla dunes

99,981

Great Lakes Council

Managing grassy headlands and littoral rainforest at Cellito Beach

79,850

Greater Taree City Council

Dawson River coastal wetland rehabilitation project, Taree

52,103

Hurstville City Council

Lime Kiln Bay Wetlands - bank restoration

83,270

Inverell Shire Council

Controlling cat's claw creeper in the Dumaresq Catchment NSW

34,930

Kyogle Council

Kyogle fish habitat rehabilitation fish passage

100,000

Maitland City Council Weed control within an historical cemetery and quarry in Maitland 29,750

Murray Local Land Services

Restoring biodiversity assets for connectivity: TSR in the S2S area

89,900

Nambucca Shire Council

Coastal habitat management for endangered population at Scotts Head

83,106

Newcastle City Council

Reconnecting and restoring Ironbark Creek corridor

99,850

North Coast Local Land Services

Beating Byron's bitou bush - the Stage 3 extension of a NNCZ

100,000

Office of Environment and Heritage

Everlasting swamp wetland restoration - Lawrence, North Coast NSW

99,500

Office of Environment and Heritage Historic precinct and EEC headland rehabilitation 95,000

OEH, National Parks & Wildlife Service

Rehabilitation of coolabah woodland in the Macquarie Marshes

33,486

Pittwater Council

Cannes Reserve coastal littoral rainforest restoration project 52,100

Port Stephens Council

Tomaree Peninsula urban koala corridor enhancement planting project

100,000

Rous Water

Wilsons River tidal pool riparian restoration

99,960

Shoalhaven City Council

Bomaderry Zieria recovery

97,361

Southern Councils Group

Milton Rocks: Restoring connectivity between escarpment and sea

77,910

The Hills Shire Council Restoration of Cumberland Plain Woodland at Bella Vista Farm Park 39,500

Tumut Shire Council

Tumut Common: Joint protection/rehabilitation - Wereboldera SCA

83,500

Tweed Shire Council

Numinbah nature links

99,951

Tweed Shire Council Restoring the waterways of the Cudgen Plateau 99,964

Tweed Shire Council

Working together to protect threatened fauna on Fingal Peninsula

99,987

Warringah Council

Dee Why Lagoon wildlife refuge habitat restoration project 87,500

28 Projects Totalling

$2,280,214

Bathurst Regional Council
Rehabilitation of Sawpit Creek
$67,970

This project will stabilise and rehabilitate the lower reach of Sawpit Creek through the installation of an in-stream rock structure. It will improve fish habitat in Sawpit Creek by reducing sediment mobilisation from erosion, enhancing fish passage across Ophir Road and by improving in-stream and riparian vegetation in the lower Sawpit Creek catchment and the adjacent Macquarie River floodplain. The project will restore Casuarina Gallery Forest across 1.9 hectares of riparian land, enhancing habitat quality for a range of native fauna.

Coffs Harbour City Council
Roberts Hill koala corridor restoration
$91,250

When complete, this project will provide an additional 45,000 square metres of mapped primary koala habitat, and improve ecological resilience of an additional 190,000 square metres.  As well as improving habitat values and long-term corridor linkages between the ranges and the coastal catchments for koalas, the works will benefit a range of other threatened species including arboreal mammals, flying foxes and micro bats.  The targeted media campaign, community workshops, spotlighting evenings and the targeted school based koala education program will raise community awareness of local issues facing koalas. This program aims to change community perception of the threats experienced by koalas in the coastal and urban environments. This will be done through targeting reserve use, dog management, driving during hours of koala activity, and planting resources. Involvement of the community in the workshops and on-ground activities will build community capacity and sense of ownership of the Reserves.

CSIRO Biosecurity Flagship
Community-based biological control program for crofton weed in NSW
$99,535

The project will enhance biological control of crofton weed through large-scale releases of a new highly host-specific agent - the rust fungus Baeodromus eupatorii (ex Mexico). The fungus attacks young leaves and stems of crofton weed and has great potential to reduce competitiveness, reproduction and spread of the weed. Partnership with the community will enable a large number of releases to be performed across crofton weed range in NSW. Natural spread of the fungus will ensure biocontrol is self-sustaining beyond the project and contributes to mitigating the threat that crofton weed poses to endemic flora in eastern NSW.

Eurobodalla Shire Council
Removing threats and improving resilience of Eurobodalla dunes
$99,981

This project will result in greater biodiversity, value and resilience in coast fore dune scrub as a result of removal of invasive species and replacement with native vegetation. The mapping will allow for a strategic targeted approach to be developed for controlling and eradicating the isolated weed populations. Chances of natural regeneration of native species will be assessed and where necessary, sites will be revegetated with species that would have occurred before disturbance.  Engagement of volunteer community groups, Local Aboriginal Land Council work crews and professional bush regeneration contractors will be sought and closely monitored to carry out on-ground weed control and revegetation. Progress will be monitored with botanical quadrats, incorporating photo points. Success will be measured by the above ground eradication of the targeted invasive species from Eurobodalla dunes and a more resilient natural dune system.

Great Lakes Council
Managing grassy headlands and littoral rainforest at Cellito Beach
$79,850

This program will draw on the expertise and form partnership collaboration between three agencies - Great Lakes Council, local National Parks and Wildlife Service and the Rural Fire Service.  The project will also engage the Forster Local Aboriginal Land Council in cultural management issues.  The aim is to achieve multiple outcomes:

  1. Develop a comprehensive bushfire management plan for Bald Head and implement a controlled ecological burn at the site together with comprehensive vegetation monitoring to establish the effect of fire on the endangered ecological community.
  2. An Aboriginal Cultural Heritage Plan will be drafted to complement the Bushfire Management Plan.
  3. Engage Worimi people in the restoration and cultural management of the area. 
  4. Monitor the effect of fire on the ecosystem and develop basic protocol on use of fire on headlands for ecological and cultural purposes in the Great Lakes Area.
  5. Regenerate adjacent rainforest to enhance biodiversity and resilience and reduce the threat of re-invasion of the headland from this area.

Greater Taree City Council
Dawson River coastal wetland rehabilitation project, Taree
$52,103

We will undertake weed control works to promote the re-establishment of understorey native species to improve forest structural and ecological condition. Suitable native plant species will be planted where required, around the edges of the forest adjoining the Taree Recreation Grounds. Damage from foot traffic is to be controlled by establishing a walking trail through parts of the forest, permitting a greater appreciation for the urban fringing forest by the community. Project success will be the rehabilitation of 18 hectares of low lying coastal wetland, swamp oak forest and saltmarsh to reduce the damaging impacts of invasive weed infestations and uncontrolled foot traffic through the site.

Hurstville City Council
Lime Kiln Bay Wetlands - bank restoration
$83,270

Lime Kiln Bay Wetland restoration works will involve engineering works to reinforce the creek banks feeding into the wetland.  The works will help improve environmental outcomes for two endangered ecological communities (EEC) that form part of the wetland. The EECs are: freshwater wetlands on coastal floodplains (0.4 hectares) and swamp oak floodplain forest (approximately one hectare). They are both downstream of the proposed work area.  Another Sydney Management Catchment Authority vegetation data map shows these EECs as S_FrW06 Estuarine Reedland and S_FW03 Coastal Freshwater Reedland.  The improved channels and embankments will more effectively deliver the stormwater through the treatment train (sediment ponds and constructed wetland) to ensure that the system can function optimally and deliver positive results for the local biodiversity and the Georges River downstream. Water quality improvements will include increased dissolved oxygen, reduced nutrients and also reduced suspended solids. Increased community awareness of local environmental issues and how the wetland functions is also an aim of the project.

Inverell Shire Council
Controlling cat's claw creeper in the Dumaresq Catchment NSW
$34,930

This project will control cat's claw creeper (Dolichandra unguis-cati) along a 165 kilometre section of the Dumaresq River (420 hectares treated), which forms the NSW/Queensland state border. Due to the location of the infestation, cross-border collaboration is critical to addressing the issue. The project will establish a partnership with Queensland Murray Darling Commission (QMDC) and Inglewood-Texas Landcare Association, to ensure both sides of the river will be treated for cat's claw creeper. Both have confirmed funding sources for on-ground control of the species on the Queensland side of the river, providing significant leverage for the project.

The project will build upon significant foundations for the project, including a QMDC commissioned aerial survey of the infestation, and eliminate constraints mentioned above. This will be achieved through securing Project Management Agreements with 18 landholders to participate in the collaborative project. Through the Agreement, each landholder will be obligated to co-fund the control of cat's claw creeper. Landholder skills in monitoring and controlling this Weed of National Significance (WoNS) will be addressed through distribution of existing WoNS and NSW DPI resources and hosting an awareness event with 24 landholders.

Kyogle Council
Kyogle fish habitat rehabilitation fish passage
$100,000

Council aim to improve access to existing high quality fish habitat in the Richmond River Catchment.  The proposed alteration to the weir incorporates both substantially lowering the weir height and installing a rock ramp fishway on the remaining lower barrier. These actions undertaken with appropriate and effective mitigation measures positively and permanently addresses key instream obstructions and other mechanisms that alter natural flow regimes of rivers and streams prohibiting access for migrating fish.  Artificial barriers are a specific identified threat to the eastern freshwater cod (EFC). The proposal therefore is expected to have a positive impact upon the viability of any local population of this species, as well as the purple spotted gudgeon. Lowering the existing weir reduces the extent of the weir pool a habitat not considered favourable to native fish species. The action to improve fish passage at the weir makes available considerable sections of upstream habitat. Substantially reducing the impact of the weir barrier addresses a key threatening structure identified within the EFC recovery plan and as such is considered to contribute to an improvement in the long term survival of the species.

Maitland City Council
Weed control within an historical cemetery and quarry in Maitland
$29,750

Weeds of ecological and cultural threat to this site, the main three including African olive, cat's claw creeper and lantana will be eradicted from the quarry precint.

This will leave more open space, sunlight and moisture to support the natural regeneration of the threatened ecological community. These weeds will also be removed from the cemetery boundaries to prevent further incursions. Some appropriate revegetation will then take place in the quarry to return species that are currently missing from this native ecosystem. As well as removing the threat posed to the ecosystem, cemetery monuments and surrounding landscape, the weed control will improve the scenic rural views from the site, enhancing its social value and contributing to broader community appeal.

Murray Local Land Services
Restoring biodiversity assets for connectivity: TSR in the Slopes to Summit area
$89,900

The Murray Local Land Services project aims to:

  1. Select target Travelling Stock Routes (TSR) by scoring the following criteria: presence of threatened species/ecosystems, linkages to other connectivity projects/protected areas (e.g. Slopes to Summit Bushlinks sites, covenanted properties, or sites under a Property Vegetation Plan), listed for relinquishment (i.e. no longer used for stock), identified as a key biodiversity asset in the NSW Murray Biodiversity Management Plan and/or are in a S2S priority area.
  2. Assess the extent of weed infestations on these TSR in order to direct strategic on-ground weed control, and allocate funds to sites where the greatest gains will be made.
  3. Manage environmental weeds on target TSR in order to improve the condition of these stepping stones for connectivity and biodiversity generally in the S2S area.
  4. Raise awareness of the value of TSR among the community, and build capacity in native vegetation and biodiversity awareness generally in the S2S Albury Priority Area through field days/workshops at key TSR.

Nambucca Shire Council
Coastal habitat management for endangered population at Scotts Head
$86,106

Council’s project will see the protection of two species of endangered communities, one of which is the only known population of Glycine clandestina (broad leaf form) through the creation of a section of weed-free bushland corridor from Scotts Head to Grassy Head to the south. This project ties in with the existing weed management programs in Nambucca Shire and Kempsey Shire in the south which will see a weed-free coastline corridor from ‘border to border’ (Grassy Head to Valla Beach).

Newcastle City Council
Reconnecting and restoring Ironbark Creek corridor
$99,850

This project will implement Stage 4 riparian rehabilitation plans, whereby council will deliver (in-kind) at least 275 metres of civil works to rebuild a natural, stable and attractive urban creek line. Funding will allow restoration of the habitat degradation and fragmentation by delivering at least 7,150 square metres of weed control, bush regeneration to support existing native vegetation and restore the site by planting 42,650 additional endemic species across the riparian zone.  This will be achieved through:

  • Mimicking vegetation structures found in reaches of similar fluvial geomorphology and floristic assemblage.
  • Restoring landscape permeability along the riparian corridor for a variety of species, including threatened and migratory species.
  • Promoting stewardship of the renewed riparian corridor and local creeks, through proven cultural and environmental education activities.
  • Encouraging residents to prevent stormwater pollution and get practically involved in ongoing rehabilitation; building support for council's ongoing investments in environmental rehabilitation and landcare and maintenance.
  • Capacity building events will be held to expand council’s own foundation to manage these sites and local Landcare participation in monitoring and maintenance.

The project will enable this award-winning team to work with regional partners to share tools and knowledge with other councils.

North Coast Local Land Services
Beating Byron's bitou bush - Stage 3 extension of a NNCZ
$100,000

This project will achieve:

  1. Development of a project delivery plan to guide the immediate extension of the National Northern Containment Zone (NNCZ) into Byron Shire and then further south to an aspirational (10 year vision) boundary of the Clarence River.
  2. Reduction of bitou bush across 377 hectares of land across four tenures in Byron Shire (Stage 3).
  3. A total of 377 hectares of coastal vegetation enhanced and rehabilitated and the recovery of several threatened species, populations and ecological communities.
  4. Actions from six strategies implemented and new and existing partnerships strengthened.
  5. Containment and extension of the bitou bush NNCZ by an additional 20 kilometres (Stage 3).
  6. Commencement of procedures and risk assessment to support the reclassification of bitou bush as a Class 3 weed in Byron Shire.

Office of Environment and Heritage
Historic precinct and EEF headland rehabilitation
$95,000

The project will control Weeds of National Significance (WONS) and protect habitat of threatened species and two endangered ecological communities (EECs) through:

  1. developing a long term site specific cross tenure management plans that will address weeds threats, prevent the spread of significant weed sources and reduce the range and density of weeds, including WONs that are impacting high conservation and biodiversity values. This will protect, enhance and restore the condition of the Myall Lakes National Park and neighbouring properties which contain littoral rainforest and coastal headland EECs;
  2. restoring a natural and cultural landscape within the historic precinct of Sugarloaf Point Lighthouse;
  3. building capacity within the community and neighbours to protect and enhance native vegetation, and  to reduce impacts from invasive weeds species and unsuitable recreational activities; and
  4. provide opportunities through the Great Lakes Aboriginal Partners Group for Aboriginal people to care for country by undertaking mentoring, training and employment programs to restore native vegetation. 

Office of Environment and Heritage
Everlasting swamp wetland restoration - Lawrence, North Coast NSW
$99,500

Natural hydrologic processes and fish passage will be restored to the last remnant natural area which occurs in Teal Lagoon. Teal Lagoon comprises approximately 38 hectares of the 2,170 hectare Everlasting Swamp and is the logical starting point for restoration. The works will include restoration of a three kilometre long tidal channel in the Sportsmans Creek estuary to allow re-flooding of the lagoon.  This will be achieved by carrying out earthworks to restore hydraulic channels and manage inundation extent and duration through the manipulation of drainage infrastructure and pathways. The rehabilitated wetland will provide valuable habitat for a range of flora, fauna and fish species (including breeding habitat for prawns and finfish) and improve sustainability of recreational and commercial fishing in the Clarence River.  Site restoration will provide long term and reliable habitat for iconic threatened species (black-necked stork, comb-crested jacana and brolga), and will also greatly increase the quantity and quality of foraging and breeding habitat for many other waterbird and fish species. By focusing on a core area, NPWS will be able to build future works around this site and extend rehabilitation to the remaining 2,130 hectares of the reserve.

OEH, National Parks & Wildlife Service
Rehabilitation of collabah woodland in the Macquarie Marshes
$33,486

This project aims to address issues of the slower rate of vegetation rehabilitation on the high floodplain sites and the lack of connecting vegetation corridors between the major watercourses on the reserve. It will use long-stem planting of 3000 coolabah trees and seeding with native grasses to increase structural complexity and ameliorate the extremes in temperature and soil moisture that currently limit floristic diversity and create vegetative corridors between Bulgeraga Creek and the Macquarie River. Local provenance coolabah seed will be collected from the Macquarie Marshes and grown at the Bilby Blooms Australian Native Nursery in Binnaway. Prior to planting, electromagnetic induction will be used to map soil moisture levels in order to determine the most suitable sites for tree planting. The project provides an opportunity for NPWS staff to work with local Aboriginal land care groups from the Wayilwan community in the planting and post-planting care of the plants. An important aim of the project will be to develop and rigorously assess a method of revegetation suitable for floodplain environments in semi-arid regions. Such methods may also then be applicable for other NPWS reserves in floodplain wetlands in the north west of the state.

Pittwater Council
Cannes Reserve coastal littoral rainforest restoration project
$52,100

With the restoration of two endangered ecological communities, this project aims to restore the balance and ensure that both vegetation communities remain healthy and viable for the long term. Council hopes to increase the reserve's resilience and implement intensive ecological restoration on degraded edges and within the core area itself where canopy collapse and vandalism has resulted in loss of canopy and has created gaps which now severely compromises the rainforest microclimate and allows weeds to colonise and alter the floristic structure, particularly that of the littoral rainforest.  Incursions by aggressive weed species on edges also pose a significant threat to the reserve.  Council hopes that this project will also heighten the public’s awareness of just how important coastal littoral rainforest plays in the overall landscape with a focus placed on the reserve's role in providing essential habitat for wildlife and underlining the importance of the interrelations between both flora and fauna.  The reserve is also an integral connection to the landscape for the general public where aesthetics recreation and overall appreciation of other lifeforms can be maintained.

Port Stephens Council
Tomaree Peninsula urban koala corridor enhancement planting project
$100,000

The reduction in viable koala habitat remnants due to development in recent years has reduced the network of connective corridors throughout the urban areas of the Tomaree Peninsula. This project proposes to increase specific koala habitat corridors in existing reserves by enrichment planting of koala food and habitat trees to create a substantial and more resilient koala habitat that will be utilised by the koala population for feeding and breeding opportunities. These corridors will allow isolated koalas to reach larger areas of habitat contained in nearby conservation areas and National Parks. The newly created habitat will prevent over browsing in current remnants that will in turn prevent starvation and ecosystem damage. These connectivity remnants will help in preserving the integrity and help diversify the gene pool of the Tomaree Koala Population. Providing more habitats will ensure koalas have a refuge if they feel under threat from dogs and over enthusiastic members of the public. This project will also provide additional koala feed tree stocks for wildlife carers to gather edible leaf for use in the rehabilitation of sick and injured koalas.

Rous Water
Wilsons River tidal pool riparian restoration
$99,960

The project aims to improve riparian vegetation condition, connectivity, extent, habitat for threatened species and water quality in the Wilsons River. Rous Water will work in partnership with landholders, landcare, local council and NSW NPWS along the Wilsons River tidal pool. This will extend riparian restoration work that Rous Water is currently engaged in. Rous Water's long term strategy is to link up existing restoration projects between Lismore and Boatharbour Nature Reserve, which is one of the last significant riparian remnants of Lowland Rainforest of Subtropical Australia (Critically Endangered Ecological Community, EPBC Act) in the region. The project will protect riverbanks from erosion and improve biodiversity by enhancing riparian vegetation, undertake strategic weed control, exclude stock and ensure high quality drinking water in the Wilsons River tidal pool. The project will raise community capacity to protect biodiversity in riparian areas and increase awareness of the importance of riparian vegetation and healthy catchments. The project will work on 8-10 sites, implementing bush regeneration and revegetation works over 15 plus hectares, including planting 6,750 trees.

Shoalhaven City Council
Bomaderry Zieria recovery
$97,361

This project is addressing two of the three objectives of the National Recovery Plan.  The first objective is to maintain the population of Zieria baeuerlenii in the Bomaderry Creek bushland.  The second, to reduce and manage the following threats through:

  • Browsing from herbivores (including rabbits and macropods)
  • Weeds
  • Impacts from recreational users (trampling and trail bikes)
  • Fire regimes
  • Stochastic events - small size of populations

Southern Councils Group
Milton Rocks: Restoring connectivity between escarpment and sea
$77,910

This project aims to:

  • Protect and revegetate three kilometres of riparian corridors within the Narrawallee Inlet and  Burrill Lake catchments to improve water quality and riparian connectivity.
  • Establish a minimum of 5,000 locally grown tubestock within these riparian corridors.
  • Support local landcare nurseries to establish a sustainable seed collection program for the long-term propagation and supply of locally grown tubestock for on-going enhancement plantings within these corridors.
  • Undertake faunal monitoring along key tributaries using remote cameras, building knowledge of local species on farms and increasing awareness of establishing and protecting riparian corridors. This will include uploading data to the OEH BioNet Atlas.
  • Development of a range of local resources including fauna list, local revegetation guide, project signage promoting escarpment to sea connectivity and improved catchment wide water quality/ awareness.

The Hills Shire Council
Restoration of Cumberland Plain Woodland at Bella Vista Farm Park
$39,500

This project will enhance the natural regeneration of critically endangered blue gum high forest at Bella Vista Farm Park.  This area has a history of disturbance which has occurred since European settlement to the late 1980s.  The site is located at the top of the Castle Hill Creek catchment which flows into the Cattai Creek catchment. Weeds are currently suppressing native and regeneration, and removal of these weeds will faciliate the native regeneration.  Assisted regeneration of the site will enhance floristic structure and diversity, while increasing the native habitat for local Indigenous fauna.  The project will also include measures to control pest species, and will seek to increase community awareness of natural area values.

Tumut Shire Council
Tumut Common: Joint protection/rehabilitation - Wereboldera SCA
$83,500

This joint project of four stakeholders will: (1) control the invasive spread of non-native woody weeds; and (2) treat, remove and prevent spread of bridal creeper, mitigating the threat to the State Conservation Area.  The two-year plan will see treatment of all blackberry and non-native weeds, (integrated chemical and manual strategy) and a concentrated effort to remove the bridal creeper, the greatest threat to a unique conservation area habitat.  A successful project will show little or no remaining blackberry and other woody weeds and the bridal creeper will have been effectively treated and manually removed.

Tweed Shire Council
Numinbah nature links
$99,951

Twenty-five hectares of key habitat in a climate change linkage area at Numinbah will be restored. Ecological restoration will improve the condition, connectivity and resilience of endangered ecosystems and protect the habitat of 35 threatened species connecting several World Heritage-listed national parks and nature reserves. Target environments will become more resilient to climate change. The project will strengthen community capacity to manage weeds and protect and enhance sensitive areas supporting high biodiversity. Workshops and information sessions will assist and support private landholders whose land management activities are critical for effective landscape-scale conservation.

Tweed Shire Council
Restoring the waterways of the Cudgen Plateau
$99,964

The project will engage the farming community to restore and rehabilitate 1.5 kilometres of waterways on the Cudgen plateau through sediment control works, revegetation and weed control. Riparian vegetation condition will be enhanced, resulting in a reduction in soil and nutrient runoff into Cudgen Creek providing greater protection for remnant vegetation, habitat for local flora and fauna, and increase connectivity between coastal vegetation communities. The project will ultimately build farming communities’ capacity to effectively manage riparian areas for productivity, biodiversity and improved water quality outcomes.

Tweed Shire Council
Working together to protect threatened fauna on Fingal Peninsula
$99,987

Tweed Council’s project will:

  1. Implement feral animal control across multiple tenures, including Tweed Byron Local Aboriginal Land Council Land, state managed Crown Land and council managed Crown Land.  Private landholders will also be invited to participate in practical on-ground management actions.  Through this control program, it is anticipated that fox and cat predation on native fauna will be reduced and local populations of threatened fauna, including critically endangered shorebirds, will start to recover.
  2. Address the threat to native fauna of disturbance and predation by domestic pets using a multi-faceted approach.  A targeted education campaign will be run, ranger patrols will be increased, interpretive signage will be updated, and current dog walking areas will be assessed for their suitability for purpose.  The implementation of this project will result in multiple benefits for threatened fauna on the Fingal Peninsula, including increased breeding success and reduced disturbance during periods of foraging and roosting.

 
All the works included above are consistent with identified recovery actions for the five species of threatened shorebirds known from the Fingal Peninsula.

Warringah Council
Dee Why Lagood wildlife refuge habitat restoration project
$87,500

The emphasis of the works will be in protecting and enhancing the existing endangered ecological communities (EECs) located in and around Dee Why Lagoon Wildlife Refuge by providing linkages to surrounding resilient bushland. The work will focus on targeting high priority weeds for the Sydney Region and Weeds of National Significance. Priority will be given to Exotic vines and scramblers, listed as a Key Threatening Process under the Threatened Species Conservation Act 1995.  Works will include the restoration of the swamp mahogany forest (swift parrot habitat) and coastal dune swamp (eastern pygmy possum habitat) - a form of the Sydney freshwater wetlands listed as endangered in NSW. Pest animal management (control of foxes, rabbits and cats) will be implemented to assist in the protection of local native animals and plant species.  Community capacity building will include a threatened species fauna fair and support to volunteer bushcare groups, which will be ongoing to improve the environmental outcomes of the project and education of local residents.

Page last updated: 03 September 2015