Heritage

Ryde Public School

Item details

Name of item: Ryde Public School
Other name/s: Buildings BOOA & BOOC
Type of item: Built
Group/Collection: Education
Category: School - State (public)
Primary address: 2 Tucker Street, Ryde, NSW 2112
Parish: Hunters Hill
County: Cumberland
Local govt. area: Ryde
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
2 Tucker StreetRydeRydeHunters HillCumberlandPrimary Address
Pope StreetRydeRyde  Alternate Address

Statement of significance:

Ryde Public School is historically significant as a highly intact collection of school buildings dating from 1877 to 1919 and later, being the earliest public school in the Ryde district, with a continuous history of providing education in Ryde since 1877. The school has historical association with the inauguration of NSW Arbor Day in 1890, and some trees within the grounds may date from this and subsequent Abor Days. The school has historical association with former staff and students,and the Ryde community. The 1877 school building has historical association with its architect George Allen Mansfield; the 1892 school building has historical association with its architect William Kemp. The 1919 brick addition to the 1877 building, and the 1923 school building have historical association with architect R.M.S. Wells. The 1877-1934 school buildings have aesthetic significance as fine late 19th and early 20th century school buidlings, which illustrate the development styles of school architecture from the late 19th century into the 20th century. The buildings - 1877 sandstone building designed by Government Architect George Allen Mansfield; 1892 building designed by Government Architect William Kemp; the 1919 additon and 1923 building designed by government Architect R.M.S. Wells, and the 1934 Infant's building - are fine examples of school buildings of their respective periods. Ryde Public School has social significance for the Ryde community.
Date significance updated: 11 Jan 12
Note: There are incomplete details for a number of items listed in NSW. The Heritage Branch intends to develop or upgrade statements of significance and other information for these items as resources become available.

Description

Designer/Maker: Government architects: G.A. Mansfield (1877 building); W. Kemp (1892 building); R.M.S. Wells (1919)
Builder/Maker: George Coutes & Son builders (1877 building)
Construction years: 1877-1919
Physical description: Ryde Public School, located around the intersection of Tucker Street and Pope Street, Ryde, has frontages to both streets, and is fenced with modern powder-coated aluminium school fencing.

The site comprises a collection of one and two storey school buildings, clustered at the northern and southern ends of the site, constructed in rusticated stone and face brickwork. Roofs are steeply gabled or hipped and clad in slate or corrugated steel,with the older buildings featuring tall chimneys and decorative barge boards.

Buildings on the site include the following:
Northern end of the site:
- an 1877 single-storey building of coursed rusticated sandstone with ashlar quoins and surrounds to openings and steep gabled slate roof with carved bargeboards. Narrow semi-circular arched window. Gothic arched doorway, tall buttressed expressed chimneys. Arrangement of tall narrow windows to end gable. Designed by Government architect George Allen Mansfield, with elements of the Victorian Rustic Gothic style,
- an 1892 two-storey sandstone building closely matching the earlier building in style and detail with gabled slate roof and simple timber bargeboards. Gothic arched front door, string course between floors, mixture of tall semi-circular arched windows and 12-paned windows. Gabled slate roof, plain barge boards. Designed by Government architect William Kemp.
- a 1919 brick addition to the original building and a 1923 building designed by government architect R.M.S. Wells, of face brick construction with a stuccoed base, slate gabled roofs with tall stuccoed chimneys and 16-paned windows.
Southern end of the site:
- a 1934 infant's building - 2 storeys, brick with a hipped roof and semi-circular arched windows to Tucker Street façade.
- a 1986 school hall, located to the west of the1934 Infant's building, at the rear of the site.

Some trees within the school grounds may relate to the school's 1890 Arbor Day plantings (the first of which occurred on the inaugural Abor Day in NSW). The site is more heavily vegetated today, however, than in 1943.
Physical condition and/or
Archaeological potential:
Good
Date condition updated:13 Jan 12
Modifications and dates: 1877: first, single storey sandstone building completed to design of GA Mansfield
1891-1892: new two storey sandstone school building constructed, officially opened in 1892 (this was originally the Infant's school building)
1919 and 1923: additional brick classroom buildings constructed
1934: new infant's school constructed
1986: hall constructed
Current use: School
Former use: School

History

Historical notes: AREA HISTORY
Aboriginal people inhabited the Sydney basin for thousands of years prior to the arrival of Europeans. The northern coastal area of Sydney was home to the Guringai people, western Sydney was home to the Dharug clans, and southern Sydney was inhabited by the Dharawal clans. The Guringai lived primarily along the foreshores of the harbour, and fished and hunted in the waters and hinterlands of the area. All clans harvested food from their surrounding bush. Self-sufficient and harmonious, they had no need to travel far from their lands, since the resources around them were so abundant, and trade with other tribal groups was well established. The British arrival in 1788 had a dramatic impact on all of the Sydney clans. Food resources were quickly diminished by the invaders, who had little understanding of the local environment. As a result, the Aboriginal people throughout the Sydney Basin were soon close to starvation. The Sydney clans fought back against the invaders, but the introduction of diseases from Europe and Asia, most notably smallpox, destroyed over half the population. The clearing of land for settlements and farms displaced local tribes and reduced the availability of natural food resources, leaving Aboriginal people reliant on white food and clothing. The French surgeon and pharmacist Rene Primavere Lesson, who visited Sydney in 1824, wrote: "the tribes today are reduced to fragments scattered all around Port Jackson, on the land where their ancestors lived and which they do not wish to leave." (Information taken from City of Ryde Aboriginal Site Management Report, Aboriginal Heritage Office, 2011).

In the early years of European settlement of Sydney, the Ryde area was found to be highly suitable for farming and orchards, and early colonial land grants to marines were given to encourage agriculture. In January 1792 land in the area which extended from Dundas to the Lane Cove River along the northern bank of the river, was granted to eight marines. The area was named by Governor Phillip the “Field of Mars”, Mars being the ancient Roman God of war, named to reflect the military associations of the land grantees. Two of these land grants were made in the modern area of the suburb of Ryde. Isaac Archer and John Colethread each received 80 acres of land on the site of the present Ryde-Parramatta Golf Links (now in West Ryde).

These grants were followed soon after by grants to ten emancipated convicts in February 1792, the land being further to the east of the marine’s grants, in the area now central to Ryde. Most of the grants were small, from 30 to 100 acres. This area was called Eastern Farms or the Eastern Boundary. By 1794 the name Eastern Farms had given way to Kissing Point, a name believed to have originated from the way in which heavily laden boats passing up the Parramatta River bumped or ‘kissed’ the rocky outcrop which extends into the river at today’s Kissing Point. Further grants were issued in 1794 and 1795, gradually occupying most of the foreshores between Meadowbank and Gladesville. Some of the grants were at North Brush, north of the Field of Mars settlement, in the area of Brush Farm and Eastwood.

Much later these were bought by John Macarthur, Gregory Blaxland and the Reverend Samuel Marsden. The district remained an important orcharding area throughout the 19th century.

The land on which Ryde House (now Willandra) was built was part of the emancipist John Small's 1794 grant and was acquired by James Devlin in 1828 from Thomas Small, James' step-father. James Devlin (1808-1875) was born in NSW, the son of Irish exile Arthur Devlin and his colonial-born wife Priscilla Squire. Devlin was originally a wheelwright, and later became a successful developer and contractor. James Devlin was a warden of St Anne's Church, Ryde and also a trustee for many years, and a Trustee of the Field of Mars Common, Devlin was instrumental in advocating for the proclamation of Ryde as a municipality and was one of the first Ryde aldermen in 1871. Devlin's Creek and Devlin Street are named after James Devlin. (Pollen, 1996).

About 1840 the name Ryde began to be used in the locality, with Devlin's 1841 subdivision being the earliest documented use of this name. Megan Martin has shown that the names Ryde and Turner Street were both chosen by James Devlin to honour the new Anglican Minister, Rev. George Turner, whose wife was a native of the English Ryde. Devlin and his neighbour, James Shepherd, had some 40 lots surveyed in a subdivision they named the Village of Ryde, with Devlin's 'East Ryde' facing St. Anne's Church and Shepherd's 'West Ryde' facing the road to Parramatta.

Devlin designed and began building the house now known as "Willandra" in 1841 on the old Small's farm and the Devlin family moved into the house in 1845. At that time it was called Ryde House.

ITEM HISTORY
In 1862 a campaign was begun to establish a public school in the Ryde village and in 1867 a formal application was made to the NSW Government for a public school to be established at Ryde. A local contribution of 100 pounds guaranteed by Messrs J.S. Farnell, E. Drinkwater, G. Wicks, W. Small and J. Devlin was promised towards the cost of a school building.

The Ryde Public School opened in 1868 in the premises of a former inn (Stanley's Inn) on the corner of Parkes Street (later Blaxland Road) and Tucker Street, a stone building with a timber shingled roof on a 10 acre site, which was purchased for 280 pounds and altered and enlarged to accommodate 3 classrooms and a new teacher's residence.

Less than ten years later, a new public school, with an adjoining teachers' residence, was opened on the ridge of Pope Street. A local campaign for a new public school building led to the erection in 1877 of a single-storey sandstone building, designed by government architect George Allen Mansfield. It opened in May 1877 with one qualified teacher and two pupil-teachers supervising an average attendance of 113 students in that first year. It was considered "more appropriate than the old premises originally built as a public house". (ref : Sydney Morning Herald March 30 1877 p.3).

At the first Arbor Day in NSW in 1890, on the initiative of the Minister for Public Instruction, trees were planted in the "Ryde Superior School Reserve" by Lord and Lady Carrington. The first tree was planted by Lady Carrington, wife of the Governor of New South Wales.

Lord and Lady Jersey opened a new Infant's school building (2 storey sandstone building) on 16 May 1892.

In July 1895 the teachers and scholars of Ryde Public School, together with Ryde's benefactor, Jane Darvall were presented by Mr and Mrs George Lovell with an illuminated address which commemorated the role of the former Mayor and Mayoress of Ryde in the inauguration of Arbor Day in New South Wales five years earlier. In return the Ryde school board and students presented Lord and Lady Carrington with an illuminated address, a very artistic production, designed and executed by Mr and Mrs JH Hunt, the headmaster and mistress of the school. (ref : Cumberland Argus & Fruitgrowers Advocate July 19 1890 p.8).

Petitions were presented to the Council of Education in 1919 and 1923 which resulted in the erection of brick classrooms to relieve overcrowding. The school already had separate Infants and Primary Departments. By 1929 enrolments had risen to 700, and the same year the Primary School was divided into separate Boy's and Girl's Departments. In 1934 a new Infants School building was constructed (Historic Ryde, 2002).

In 1986 a school hall was constructed, and a monument funded by the NSW Bicentennial Council.

The school continues to provide public primary education for the Ryde area.

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
6. Educating-Educating Education-Activities associated with teaching and learning by children and adults, formally and informally. Developing Community-

Assessment of significance

SHR Criteria a)
[Historical significance]
Ryde Public School is historically significant as a highly intact collection of school buildings dating from 1877 to 1919 and later, being the earliest public school in the Ryde district, with a continuous history of providing education in Ryde since 1877.
SHR Criteria b)
[Associative significance]
The school has historical association with the inauguration of NSW Arbor Day in 1890, and some trees within the grounds may date from this and subsequent Arbor Days.The school has historical association with former staff and students and the Ryde community. The 1877 school building has historical association with its architect George Allen Mansfield; the 1892 school building has historical association with its architect William Kemp. The 1919 brick addition to the 1877 building, and the 1923 school building have historical association with architect R.M.S. Wells.
SHR Criteria c)
[Aesthetic significance]
The 1877-1934 school buildings have aesthetic significance as fine late 19th and early 20th century school buidlings, which illustrate the development styles of school architecture from the late 19th century into the 20th century. The buildings - 1877 sandstone building designed by Government Architect George Allen Mansfield; 1892 building designed by Government Architect William Kemp; and the 1919-1923 section designed by government Architect R.M.S. Wells, and the 1934 Infant's building - are fine examples of school buildings of their periods.
SHR Criteria d)
[Social significance]
Ryde Public School has social significance for the Ryde community.
SHR Criteria g)
[Representativeness]
A representative late 19th to early 20th century public school.
Integrity/Intactness: Relatively intact early buildings (1877-1934).
Assessment criteria: Items are assessed against the PDF State Heritage Register (SHR) Criteria to determine the level of significance. Refer to the Listings below for the level of statutory protection.

Recommended management:

DOCUMENTATION: A Heritage Impact Statement is required by Council to accompany any Development Application for non-minor work. The buildings on the site constructed between 1877 and 1934 are considered to be of heritage significance. Please consult Council staff about your proposal and the level of documentation that will be required as early as possible in the process. Note that Council has adopted planning provisions to assist in the making of minor changes that will not have any impact on the significance of properties without the need to prepare a formal application or Heritage Impact Statement. In this case Council must be consulted in writing to confirm the nature of the works. APPROACHES TO MANAGING THE HERITAGE SIGNIFICANCE OF THE PROPERTY: (Note: the detailed requirements for each property will be determined on a case-by-case basis. The following advice provides general principles that should be respected by all development.) Further subdivision of the land is discouraged. The overall form of the buildings constructed between 1877 and 1934 should be retained and conserved and new uses should be restricted to those that are historically consistent and/or able to be accommodated within the existing fabric with minimal physical impact. All significant exterior fabric of these buildings should be retained and conserved. The setting of the property should be protected from the impacts of development and significant plantings, and other landscape elements should be retained. The external surfaces and materials of significant facades to the buildings constructed between 1877 and 1934 (generally, but not limited to, those visible from the street or a public place including the water) should be retained, and painted surfaces painted in appropriate colours. Sandstone and face brickwork should not be painted or coated. Significant door and window openings should not be enlarged or enclosed. OPPORTUNITIES FOR CHANGE: All development should respect the principle of ‘do as much as necessary but as little as possible’. In most instances, new work should not attempt to replicate historic forms. A ‘contemporary neutral’ design that sits quietly on the site, and enhances the quality of the item, will be a more sympathetic outcome than a ‘fake’ historic building. Respecting the scale and overall forms, proportions and rhythms of the historic fabric is critical. As a general principle, all major alterations and additions to the buildings constructed between 1877 and 1934 on the site, should NOT: - result in demolition of significant fabric - result in excessive site cover; - be visually prominent or overwhelm the existing buildings. - intrude into any views of the property from the public domain, including the water; and should be: - located behind the historic building/s on the site (those built between 1877 and 1934); -be visually subservient and have minimal impact on heritage significance including that of views over the property. Single storey extensions will generally be preferred over two-storey forms unless there is a sound heritage reason to do otherwise. Structures forward of the front building line of the significant buildngs on the site (those constructed between 1877 and 1934) are strongly discouraged.

Recommendations

Management CategoryDescriptionDate Updated
Statutory InstrumentList on a Local Environmental Plan (LEP)10 Jan 12

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Local Environmental PlanRyde LEP 2010130   
Local Environmental PlanRyde Draft LEP 2011I130   
Local Environmental PlanRyde LEP 2014I13002 Sep 14   
Local Environmental Plan - LapsedLEP No. 105 17 Jan 03 14 
Heritage study     

Study details

TitleYearNumberAuthorInspected byGuidelines used
Ryde Heritage Study198879Jonathan Falk Planning Consutants P/L Assoc with Rodney Jensen and Assoc P/L  No
Review of 1988 Ryde Heritage Study.2002 Hill Thalis Architecture and Urban Projects.  Yes
Ryde SHI Review Stage 12012 Paul Davies Pty Ltd  Yes

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
WrittenAngela Phippen2008Ryde suburb history, Dictionary of Sydney online
WrittenKevin Shaw (ed), Ryde Historical Society2002Historic Ryde: A guide to some significant heritage sites in the City of Ryde
WrittenNBRS & Partners2011Statement of heritage impact: Top Ryde City Apartments: Building D, March 2011
WrittenNSW National Trust listing form1981 
WrittenP. Tonkin Thesis: Government architects: thesis on NSW Schools

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

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Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Local Government
Database number: 2340025


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