Chippendale Heritage Conservation Area | NSW Environment & Heritage

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Chippendale Heritage Conservation Area

Item details

Name of item: Chippendale Heritage Conservation Area
Type of item: Built
Group/Collection: Urban Area
Category: Other - Urban Area
Primary address: Refer To Map, Chippendale, NSW 2008
Parish: Petersham
County: Cumberland
Local govt. area: Sydney

Boundary:

Broadway, Abercrombie St, O'Connor St, Balfour St, Wellington St, Regent St, Cleveland St, Beaumont St, Myrtle St, Rose St, Cleveland St & City Rd. It is proposed to delete the area between Beaumont, Myrtle, Abercrombie and Cleveland Streets owing to the high number of detracting or neutral buildings.
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
Refer To MapChippendaleSydneyPetershamCumberlandPrimary Address

Statement of significance:

Chippendale is of historical significance for threekey themes: 19th century industry, industrial working class residential and quality residential housing. Industry was the key historical role of Chippendale due to its location relative to the City. Housing for industrial workers is integral to the industrial history of Chippendale, evidenced by early housing in Elim and Chandler's Avenues.

Chippendale is also of historical significance for the extent of land resumption which occurred in the early 20th century which increased the dominance of industry in the area. Strickland House, the first public housing by the City Architect, is significant as evidence of the need to provide quality low income housing.

Chippendale's association with high quality 19th century residential housing predominantly predates the intrusion of the railway around Regent Street. Chippendale demonstrates several key period of layers for the development of inner city Sydney: the first layer as a direct result of the subdivision of the Cooper Estate and Shepherd's Nursery, subsequent layers from Railway construction and from the resumption era and the construction of industry and related housing for industrial workers

Chippendale is an exceptional area with multiple key period layers, an early residential suburb profoundly affected by land resumptions and the construction of industrial buildings and associated Victorian working class housing. The area contains many intact buildings which are contributory to the area's significance.
Date significance updated: 14 Jul 06
Note: There are incomplete details for a number of items listed in NSW. The Heritage Division intends to develop or upgrade statements of significance and other information for these items as resources become available.

Description

Designer/Maker: Various
Builder/Maker: Various
Construction years: 1838-1950
Physical description: The Chippendale Conservation Area consists of the area bounded by City Road, Broadway, Abercrombie, O'Connor, Balfour, Wellington, Regent and Cleveland Streets. The area includes the Cleveland Street, City Road and Broadway Streetscapes. It is characterised by residential and industrial developments with commercial development concentrated along the main thoroughfares: Abercrombie Street, Broadway, City Road, Cleveland and Regent Streets.

The built form of the area reflects the historical development and can be broadly grouped into the following areas:

The predominantly ninteenth century residential and industrial area west of Abercrombie Street;

The predominantly twentieth century residential and industrial area east of Abercrombie Streeet reflecting major land resumptions;

The boundary thoroughfares that relate to the perimeter parkland and commercial areas.

Part of the distinctive character of the area is the contrast in scale between one to three storey terraces and the larger cubic forms of warehouses and industrial development.

Street Ratings

Abercrombie Street: wide, multi-lane one way street, defined by Victorian era terraces, predominantly 2 storey, at the southern end, with the northern end dominated by large heritage-listed sites, the former Blackfriars site (now Notre Dame University campus) to the west, and the former Carlton & United Breweries site to the east. Impact of heavy traffic has led to extensive unsympathetic enclosure of first floor terrace balconies. Street Rating: A

Balfour Street
A wide street, with mixed street tree plantings on both sides, dominated by the heritage-listed 3 storey Federation Queen Anne housing development at 66-80 Balfour St. Street Rating: B

Bartley Lane
A narrow Victorian era service lane, visible from both ends, and with a pedestrian link through Strickland Park at the end of Bartley Street. Characterised on the south by the rear gardens of Victorian era terraces fronting Bartley Street, and with the rear of modern development to the north side. Street Rating: B

Bartley Street: wide street with very wide footpath to the north side, including substantial street tree plantings within the wide footpath. Characterised by 2 storey Victorian and Federation era terrace housing. Street Rating: A

Blackfriars Lane: narrow kinked Victorian era lane, no street trees, flanked by 3-4 storey buildings built to the street alignment. Street rating: B

Blackfriars Street: wide kinked, short street with medium sized street tree plantings, defined by 3-4 storey insitutional buildings, Federation warehouses or residential flat buildings built to the street alignment on both sides. Street rating: A

Broadway - southern (Chippendale) side only, from Abercrombie St to City Road
Wide heavily trafficked thoroughfare distinguished by major buildings, many of them heritage items or proposed heritage items (Notre Dame Sydney Campus, Hotel Broadway, former banks and Victorian commercial buildings). Telstra building is a notable large scale detracting element. The site at 112-126 Broadway, currently used for a car wash, is detracting, but also should be considered an opportunity site for future sympathetically designed development to enhance the streetscape. Street Rating: B

Buckland Street: wide, long, kinked street with substantial street tree planting, defined by 2-4 storey buildings built to the street alignment. A mix of modern residential flats and Federation warehouses, many converted to new residential uses. Street rating: B

Chandler Place
Narrow short dead-end lane off City Road between early 20th century commercial buildings fronting City Road. No building front Chandler Place. No street plantings. Appears as a remnant of an earlier street pattern. Street Rating: A.

Chippen Lane
A narrow Victorian era serrvice lane with no street planting. Street Rating: B

Chippen Street North (Queen St to Meagher St)
Narrow inner city lane width street, dominated by early 20th century industrial buildings (Federation warehouses), and no street tree plantings. Street Rating: B

Chippen Street South (Meagher St to Cleveland St)
A wide street of mixed character, including a mix of early 20th warehouses particularly on the corners with Meagher Street, and extensive modern development. Deciduous street tree planting on the west side of the street only. Street Rating: C

City Road - from Broadway to Cleveland Street
A wide multi-lane arterial road with Victoria Park on the western side and Chippendale on the eastern side. Remarkably intact mix of Victorian through to 1920s commercial/retail buildings and grand late Victorian terrace housing, with only 2 modern developments, and a number of prominent heritage items (for example Lansdowne Hotel, 92 City Road). Most terraces are setback, allowing for front gardens and softening landscaping, while commercial/retail buildings are set to the street alignment. Retail/commercial buildings are generally Federation through to the 1920s, while terraces are gnerally late Victorian (1880s). City Road presents as a street of grand often 3 storey late Victorian terracing fronting Victoria Park, altered by the incursion of commercial/retail developments in the early 20th century. Both period layers are now significant. Street rating: A

Cleveland Lane
A narrow traditional Victorian era laneway, no street plantings. Street Rating A

Cleveland Street - from Abercrombie Street to Beaumont Street, north side only
Wide, heavily trafficked street. . 4 storey scale mix of Federation commercial & industrial buildings and modern residential flats and flats conversions of Federation industrial buildings. Medium level of tree planting (paperbarks). Street Rating: B

Cleveland Street - from Beaumont Street to City Road, north side only
Wide, heavily trafficed street, characterised by traditional working class Victorian Filigree terraces, Victorian corner shops and The Rose Hotel, all built to the street alignment. Street Rating: A

Dale Avenue
a narrow Victorian era service lane-width street with no street planting. Characterised by the interesting juxtaposition of the rear of the Federation Queen Anne style residential development 66-80 Balfour St, a heritage item), and the rear of c. 1920s warehouses. Street Rating: B

Dangar Place
Wide street dominated by multi-storey modern residential development. No street tree planting. Street Rating: C

Dangar Street
Narrow street dominated by multi-storey modern residential development. No street tree planting. Street rating: C

Daniels Street: short wide street dominated by multistorey modern residential development, including some 1970s detracting development. Street corners to Shepherd St and Buckland Street generally defined by contributory warehouses, however overall the street presents as altered by modern development. Street rating: C

Dick Street
A narrow kinked laneway width street with some street planting (shrubs) in pots, and no street tree plantings. Mix of Victorian terrace houses and early 20th century warehouses. Street Rating: B

Docker Lane: Narrow Victorian era lane, no street plantings. Street Rating: C

Elim Place: a short, narrow dead-end laneway off City Road between early 20th century shops & commercial buildings fronting City Road. No street planting. Characterised by Victorian Georgian sandstone cottages (heritage Items) at Nos. 6, 8, and 10. Appears as a remnant of an earlier street pattern. Street Rating: A.

Grafton Lane
Narrow Victorian industrial laneway, no street planting, no buildings fronting the lane. Dominated by 3-4 storey buildings built to the street alignment of varying development periods. Street Rating: B

Grafton Street
Wide street, scattered street tree planting. Buildings of generally 2-3 storeys, some modern, some c. 1920s warehouses, built to the street alignment. Street Rating: B

Knox Street: Short, wide kinked street steeply rising to the west. No street tree planting. Flanked by 3 storey buildings of varying periods built to the street alignment. Important set of sandstone steps on the south side of the street. Street Rating: B.

Levey Street: narrow Victorian era street, no street tree plantings, defined by Victorian terraces built to the street alignment. Street Rating: A

Little Queen Street
Narrow, kinked, inner city lane width street, flanked on the north side with early 20th century Federation warehouses and later industrial buildings, on the south side with Victorian Filigree terrace housing and modern residential development, and no street tree plantings. Street Rating: B

Maze Lane
A narrow traditional Victorian era laneway, no street plantings. Street Rating A

McAllister Lane
Traditional Victorian era service lane with no street planting. Street rating: A

Meagher St
Wide street with mix of small scale Victorian terrace housing (2-10, 11A to 15), large scale Federation and 1920swarehouses (29-31 Meagher St, 27 Meagher St) and some detracting modern development (Nos. 1-9, 20-40 Meagher St). Street Rating: B

Moorgate Lane
Typical Victorian era laneway, flanked by Federation warehouses and modern development. Hard-edged with no street tree planting. Street Rating: B

Moorgate Street
Short street dominated by multistorey modern development. Street rating: C

Myrtle Lane
A narrow traditional Victorian era dead-end laneway, no street plantings, substantial overhanging plantings. Street Rating A

Myrtle Street: City Road to Pine Street
Wide, quiet street dominated by 2 storey Victorian Filigree style terraces with Federation & Victorian commercial/industrial buildings to corners. Brushbox and other species of street tree plantings. Street Rating: A

Myrtle Street - PineSt/Buckland Street to Abercrombie Street
Wide street of very mixed character - multi-storey modern residential flat buildings mixed with Federation commercial and industrial buildings. Scattered street trees. Street rating: C


O'Connor Street east
Narrow street with low shrubby street tree plantings, only on the north side. Mix of Victorian terrace housing and warehouses, the street includes part of the Carlton & United Breweries site on the north side, some detracting development. Street Rating: C

O'Connor Street west
narrow Victorian street with substantial street tree plantings, mix of 4 storey Federation warehouses and modern buildings of similar scale, and 2 storey Victorian terraces, built to the street alignment. Street rating: B

Paints Lane
A narrow traditional Victorian era laneway, no street plantings, some overhanging plantings. Street Rating A

Pine Lane north
A narrow traditional Victorian era laneway,hard-edged, no street plantings. Street Rating A

Pine Lane south
A narrow traditional Victorian era laneway, hard-edged, no street plantings, flanked by modern development on one side. Street Rating B

Pine Place
A narrow traditional Victorian era laneway, no street plantings. Street Rating A

Pine Street
Relatively wide street, with a mixed built form of Victorian terraces and commercial (both Federation era and modern) buildings.Street trees (paperbark). Street rating: B

Queen Street
Relatively wide street with patchy street plantings on the north side only. A mix of residential and industrial buildings. More intact on the southern side. Street Rating: B

Regent Street - west side only - Wellington St to Cleveland Street Wide, heavily trafficked street with scattered deciduous street tree planting. A mixture of Victorian era terrace shops, early 20th century multi-storey warehouse/commercial development with one modern multi-storey commercial building (87-97 Regent St) Street Rating: A

Rose Street
Long north-south street which kinks to the east at the northern end, with substantial street tree planting. The street is dominated by Victorian terraces, generally 2 storeys and some particularly grand (heritage items at 10-20 Rose Street), also some 1 storey terrace groups. There are few modern intrusions in the street. No. 18 Shepherd St (corner Rose Street) is a prominent mid-Victorian heritage item which enhances both streets. Street Rating: A

Shepherd Street, northern end between Myrtle St and Broadway: wide, kinked street dominated by 2 storey early 20th century shops and late Victorian terraces, with little modern development, generally built to the street alignment. Substantial street trees (brushbox). Street Rating: A

Shepherd Street: Southern end of Shepherd Street between Cleveland & Myrtle Street: mix of Victorian Filigree 2 storey terraces and 2-3 storey Federation and modern commercial buildings. Street rating: B

Smithers Street: narrow Victorian era street, medium sized street trees, mix of Victorian terraces and warehouses. Street rating: B

Sutherland Lane - narrow Victorian era lane, no street trees, sandstone guttering, defined by 2-3 storey buildings built to the lane alignment on both sides. Street Rating: A

Teggs Lane
Narrow inner city lane, flanked on both sides with early 20th century commercial buildings, and no street tree plantings. Street Rating: A

Tracey Lane
A narrow traditional Victorian era laneway, no street plantings, but with overhanging planting softening the lanescape. Street Rating A

Wiley Street
Narrow street dominated by multi-storey modern residential development. No street tree planting. Stret Rating: C
Further information: The Chippendale Heritage Conservation Area was previously listed in the South Sydney Amending LEP 2000. In SLEP2012 listing, the boundaries are amended. Premises on Wiley St and Dangar St are excluded from the CA.

Heritage Inventory sheets are often not comprehensive, and should be regarded as a general guide only. Inventory sheets are based on information available, and often do not include the social history of sites and buildings. Inventory sheets are constantly updated by the City as further information becomes available. An inventory sheet with little information may simply indicate that there has been no building work done to the item recently: it does not mean that items are not significant. Further research is always recommended as part of preparation of development proposals for heritage items, and is necessary in preparation of Heritage Impact Assessments and Conservation Management Plans, so that the significance of heritage items can be fully assessed prior to submitting development applications.

History

Historical notes: The "Eora people" was the name given to the coastal Aborigines around Sydney. Central Sydney is therefore often referred to as "Eora Country". Within the City of Sydney local government area, the traditional owners are the Cadigal and Wangal bands of the Eora. There is no written record of the name of the language spoken and currently there are debates as whether the coastal peoples spoke a separate language "Eora" or whether this was actually a dialect of the Dharug language. Remnant bushland in places like Blackwattle Bay retain elements of traditional plant, bird and animal life, including fish and rock oysters.

With the European invasion of the Sydney region, the Cadigal and Wangal people were decimated but there are descendants still living in Sydney today. All cities include many immigrants in their population. Aboriginal people from across the state have been attracted to suburbs such as Pyrmont, Balmain, Rozelle, Glebe and Redfern since the 1930s. Changes in government legislation in the 1960s provided freedom of movement enabling more Aboriginal people to choose to live in Sydney.

(Information sourced from Anita Heiss, "Aboriginal People and Place", Barani: Indigenous History of Sydney City http://www.cityofsydney.nsw.gov.au/barani )

By 1817, prior to the official grant of land in 1819, William Chippendale had built a house and quarters for his assigned servants on 95 acres of land bounded to the west by Blackwattle Swamp Creek.

In 1821 Chippendale sold his grant to Solomon Levey, a convict turned colonial entrepreneur, who eventually owned most of Alexandria, Redfern and Waterloo. Levey sold off parcels of Chippendale’s land grant in the 1820s but when he died in London in 1833 his colonial holdings still included 32 ½ acres of un-subdivided land in Chippendale.

Meanwhile in 1825 Robert Cooper, another former convict, was granted 17 acres adjoining Chippendale’s grant on the north, fronting Parramatta Road. He built the Brisbane Distillery on this land in 1825, a venture which reputedly cost more that £20,000. The Brisbane Distillery, named for Governor Brisbane, was an early colonial landmark and comprised a range of stone buildings, including mills and malting-stores as well as the distillery.

East of Cooper’s grant, Major George Druitt was granted 8 acres in 1819. He sold 4½ acres of this land to brewer and merchant John Tooth in 1834. Tooth and his partner Charles Newnham opened the Kent Brewery on this site in October 1835. The brewery has dominated the industrial landscape of Chippendale ever since.

In contrast to Cooper’s Distillery and Tooth’s brewery the remaining original grant in the Chippendale area was developed as an horticultural enterprise. In 1826 nurseryman Thomas Shepherd was granted 28 acres behind the distillery, fronting Newtown Road and bounded on the east by Blackwattle Swamp Creek. Like Chippendale’s grant, Shepherd’s extended into today’s Darlington.

In the 1840s Robert Cooper built a group of stone cottages on Cooks River Road (City Road) close to the quarries he had excavated to build his distillery with a further 30 or 40 houses being built parallel to Parramatta Road.

Subdivision of the area south of the brewery occurred in August 1838 which was associated with the development of several of the streets in the area, including Dale, Balfour and Chippen Streets in 1842. Banks Street grew as the small commercial nucleus of the area containing 6 shops, 27 houses and one hotel by 1848. Further subdivision occurred in 1850, and in 1854 the first subdivision of Shepherd’s nursery took place.

In 1850 the Australasian Sugar Company took over Cooper’s Distillery buildings and by 1855 this company had given way to the Colonial Sugar Refining Company (CSR). In 1855 CSR demolished most of the buildings in Cooper’s Row and in their place built more substantial two storey brick houses. In 1878 CSR relocated to Pyrmont and the subdivision plans were drawn up for Blackfriars Estate. In 1889 an act was passed to allow Council to take over the streets and lane on the Blackfriars and Shepherd’s Nursery Estates and things began to improve in the area.

In 1911 Chippendale was resumed by the Council. Opposition arose in the area against the full scale demolition of residential buildings in favour of industrial development, as had occurred in other areas, and a compromise position was reached by the end of 1911 allowing both land uses.

In the early years of the twentieth century many unsold lots on the Blackfriars Estate were bought for industrial or warehouse uses and throughout the 1930s, 1940s and early 1950s, the substitution of factories for houses continued. But industrial expansion also meant that Chippendale was fast becoming an obsolete industrial location with companies needing more space for parking and commercial vehicles faced problems manoeuvring around the narrow streets.

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Commerce-Activities relating to buying, selling and exchanging goods and services (none)-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Industry-Activities associated with the manufacture, production and distribution of goods (none)-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. (none)-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal (none)-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Living in the City-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Development-
7. Governing-Governing Government and Administration-Activities associated with the governance of local areas, regions, the State and the nation, and the administration of public programs - includes both principled and corrupt activities. Slum clearance, Resumptions-

Assessment of significance

SHR Criteria a)
[Historical significance]
Significant for:
-its ability to reflect aspects of the unique character of the nineteenth century suburb including workers residential, industry and quality residential.
-its ability to reflect the early character of Chippendale through the survival of key public buildings from -the 1860’s and 1870’s including the original Roman Catholic Church, St Benedicts, and the City Mission in Queen Street.
-the extent of land reclamation that occurred in the early twentieth century which increased the dominance of industry in the area.

Strickland House is significant as evidence of the first public housing by the City Architect.
The Brewer, J.C. Goodwins, E.G. Bishop, Building Magazine reflect the long term importance of Chippendale as an industrial suburb of Sydney.
SHR Criteria b)
[Associative significance]
The area is significant for its association with the 1819 land grant to William Chippendale and the 1820 Cooper’s distillery estate and sugar refinery which lies outside the area.

(sourced from Chippendale Heritage Study by Architectural Projects, October 1999)
SHR Criteria c)
[Aesthetic significance]
Chippendale is significant as a highly intact nineteenth century industrial working class suburb characterised by a varied range of finishes and scale typified by simple forms of both two and one storey height.

It is also significant for its development of quality residences as evidenced in Regent Street and City Road.

Chippendale, particularly the area of the Darling Nursery Estate, is significant for its cohesive streetscape qualities.

The Strickland Building is significant as a fine example of public housing and the first public housing designed by the City Architect.

The City Mission and St Benedicts Church are significant as quality religious institutions built to assist the working class population.

Part of the Chippendale Conservation Area displays positive townscape qualities with the overriding character being late Victorian period terraces of both one and two storey in a traditional grid pattern subdivision with night soil rear lanes. The majority of buildings are largely intact and nearly all contribute to the character and visual qualities of the area. The area demonstrates a variety of building styles and materials.
SHR Criteria d)
[Social significance]
Significant for the continuing association of the area with industry and the importance that this association has to the residential population.

(sourced from Chippendale Heritage Study by Architectural Projects, October 1999)
SHR Criteria e)
[Research potential]
The area is significant for the archaeological potential of redeveloped sites.
SHR Criteria f)
[Rarity]
The area is significant for its ability to understand the continued expansion of an industrial working community adjacent to the city.

(sourced from Chippendale Heritage Study by Architectural Projects, October 1999)
SHR Criteria g)
[Representativeness]
The area is significant for the establishment of early Colonial/Victorian subdivision.
Integrity/Intactness: High
Assessment criteria: Items are assessed against the PDF State Heritage Register (SHR) Criteria to determine the level of significance. Refer to the Listings below for the level of statutory protection.

Recommended management:

POLICY RECOMMENDATIONS (Generic Conservation Area policies) 1.Protection of Significance (a) Subdivision Retain Victorian and Federation subdivision patterns - Don't allow further amalgamation of sites (b) Key periods of Significant (Contributory) Development: -Retain the Victorian and Federation subdivision patterns, and further amalgamation should not be permitted - Retain one storey Victorian terraces, and discourage second floor additions. - Retain Victorian and Federation terraces, - Retain Victorian, Federation and Interwar warehouses, hotels, religious buildings, and institutional buildings. -Retain Inter- war commercial development fronting the main streets such as Broadway, City Road and Cleveland Street and Regent Street. -Retain the Strickland buildings, the early public housing in the block bounded by Balfour St, Meagher St, Cleveland St & Dale Avenue, -Retain small scale of early development -Maintain building alignments established by significant Victorian and Federation development. - Retain form - Retain finishes and details - Reinstate verandahs, balconies, front cast iron palisade fences, lost detail - Protect intact rear lanes -retain accessways and carriageways of moderate and high integrity - Additions to terraces not to exceed ridge height and retain original roof form - Discourage front dormers except where already present in a terrace row - Encourage reinstatement of roofing materials and roofing detail where not original or missing c) Retail Development: - Protect and reveal t street history of the area (Broadway, City Road, Cleveland Street, Regent Street, Abercrombie Street particularly) - retain generally small scale of retail uses - Maintain landscape components - Reveal original fabric. Remove non original features, particularly if they conceal original detail. - Restore detail to evidence - Relocate existing floor area that detracts to locations with less heritage impact - Reconstruct new shopfronts modelled on surviving original shopfronts in the street and derived from on-site evidence. In particular original splayed recessed entrances. - Retain shopfronts prior to 1910 (generally timber) incorporating splayed recessed entrances; - Retain shopfronts c.1910-19 (generally incorporating use of tiles and metal shop fittings). - Coordinate signage - Avoid loss of original significant shopfronts 2. Redevelopment of Non Contributing Sites - encourage interpretation of Victorian or Federation subdivision pattern - respect scale and form of contributory development in the vicinity of sites - respect building line of contributory development in the vicinity of sites - encourage rendered and painted fishes or dark face brick finishes, depending on the context of sites - encourage appropriate contemporary detail - provide landscape screening/softening except where inappropriate due to need to build to street alignment to match the setback pattern in the vicinity - Recognise the collective precedent and impact of the proposal - Develop approach for sympathetic new development to enhance existing heritage character and level of detail - Respect scale and form of contributory development in the vicinity - Avoid flat reflective monotonous glazed façades - Avoid visual clut: A/C, signs 3. Enhance Significance o the heritage conservation area - Maintain and enhance street planting to unify streetscape - Encourage redevelopment of detracting sites - Encourage render/paint finishes to detracting development where existing finishes are detracting - Interpret Victorian and Federation street pattern and subdivision - Provide landscape screening/softening to detracting sites except where inappropriate due to need to build to street alignment to match the setback pattern in the vicinity - Discourage reproduction of Victorian detail in contemporary development - Encourage sympathetic form, scale, and finishes in contemporary development 4. Car Parking - do not allow carparking access from the street - Generally allow parking access from rear lanes. - Reduce impact of existing carparking access from the street where possible 5. Landscaping - Encourage trees at the end of streets to reinforce landscape vistas and frame views - Encourage trees to screen detracting development 6. View Protection - Reinforce street end vistas with street trees - Encourage and develop appropriate distant vistas 7. Boundary Adjustment - Adjust Heritage Conservation Area boundar to exclude areas which do not contribute to an understanding of the Significance of the Heritage Conservation Area: exclude area between Myrtle Street in the north and Cleveland Street in the south, the eastern side of Beaumont Street and the western side of Abercrombie Street, but retaining Nos. 75-55 and 79-83 Myrtle Street, 81-103 Abercrombie Street and 117-133 Abercrombie Street within the heritage conservation area. 8. Heritage Items - Protect Heritage Items within the heritage conservation area

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Local Environmental PlanSydney LEP 2012C914 Dec 12   
Local Environmental Plan - LapsedAmendment No 3 SSLEP1998CA1228 Jul 00   
Heritage study     

Study details

TitleYearNumberAuthorInspected byGuidelines used
South Sydney Heritage Study1993 Tropman & Tropman Architects  Yes
Chippendale Heritage Conservation Study1999 Architectural Projects Pty Ltd  Yes

References, internet links & images

None

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

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Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Local Government
Database number: 2421466
File number: S047440


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