Heritage

Wyong Railway Station Group

Item details

Name of item: Wyong Railway Station Group
Other name/s: Wyong Creek
Type of item: Built
Group/Collection: Transport - Rail
Category: Railway Platform/ Station
Primary address: Pacific Highway, Wyong, NSW 2259
Local govt. area: Wyong

Boundary:

North: The line of the northern edge of the western carpark South: The line of the southern boundary of the former Station Master's Residence (but not including the shops and former station master's residence) East: Property boundary fronting Howarth Street West: Property boundary fronting the Pacific Highway
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
Pacific HighwayWyongWyong  Primary Address

Owner/s

Organisation NameOwner CategoryDate Ownership Updated
RailCorpState Government 
RailCorpState Government 
RailCorpState Government 

Statement of significance:

Wyong Railway Station has significance at a local level. The station was opened in 1887 and immediately brought about the rapid development of the town. Wyong Railway Station has historical importance as an early generator of employment and industry in the district. Historically it was an important local facility for the transport of agricultural goods such as livestock and had a large stockyards and goods shed, although the site no longer demonstrates this aspect of its history.

Wyong Railway station has aesthetic significance at a local level as an integral part of a wider urban railway precinct in a prominent position within the town which includes the station buildings, adjacent shops and established palm trees. The enclosed space created by the Railway Station, the Railway Square Shops, hotel and the palm trees lining the Pacific Highway helps to maintain the historic setting of the station in the town centre. This grouping creates a close relationship between the station and town centre that has not been maintained in many other towns in the metro north region.

The row of palm trees in the adjacent carpark have been a feature of the station almost since its establishment and have local landmark status. Despite numerous additions which detract greatly from the original form, the main station building (1912) has aesthetic significance as an early twentieth century railway station building with incorporated signal box.
Date significance updated: 24 Apr 09
Note: There are incomplete details for a number of items listed in NSW. The Heritage Branch intends to develop or upgrade statements of significance and other information for these items as resources become available.

Description

Designer/Maker: New South Wales Department of Railways
Builder/Maker: New South Wales Department of Railways
Construction years: 1912-
Physical description: Station Building, including Signal Box, Platform 3- Type 11(c.1912)
Station Manager's Office, Platform 3 (c.1944)
Luggage Room
Station Building, Platform 1/2 (c.1992)
Platform Shelters, (c.1992)
Platforms, (c.1984)
Footbridge, (c.1992)
Landscaping
Potential Archaeology
Moveable

CONTEXT
Wyong Railway Station is located north of the Wyong River between Howarth Street and the Pacific Highway. With the large adjacent commuter carpark and western bus interchange lined by established palm trees, the station is a central feature of the township and together with the former station master's residence (privately owned) and adjacent Victorian era shops forms an important railway precinct within the region. The station consists of three platforms, numerous platform buildings of varying ages and styles, and a visually dominating modern footbridge at the northern end of the platform. The eastern side of the station now contains a commuter carpark on land that was once occupied by sidings and a weighbridge. Beyond the Howarth Street overbridge to the north of the station, a number of moveable heritage items associated with the station are stored within the Wyong Railway Depot.

STATION BUILDING, INCLUDING SIGNAL BOX (PLATFORM 3) (c.1912)
External: Wyong Railway Station is a modified Type A8 -A10 station building dating from 1912. The station building contains a signal box at its southern end and features a central porch facing east. The building is of typical red brick construction with rendered string course, architraves and window sills. The building features a corrugated iron gabled roof with timber bargeboards and finials. There are two painted chimneys with rendered cornices along the ridgeline. Awnings on both the eastern and western elevations are supported by curved cast iron brackets (only the eastern awning is original), and these extend beyond the length of the building to the north and south. Timber valances remain on the eastern section of the original awning, but these are obscured by modern extensions. A modern central timber gable over the porch on the western elevation denotes the main entrance. The walls of the signal box (incorporated into the station) on the southern and eastern elevations are of timber construction on a brick plinth. The signal box features a vertical timber boarded dado, clear glazed central windows and 8 pane coloured glass clerestory windows. Security grilles cover the clear glazed windows and door and detracts greatly from the signal box's appearance.

Internal: The station has been highly modified internally with the original layout changed to provide larger staff areas. Where original walls remain, they are painted plaster with no dado and have timber skirting boards. The original general waiting room has been subdivided to create a larger ticket selling office, and the ladies waiting room is now staff accommodation. The signal box retains the original mini-orb ceiling and ceiling rose, waratah style air vents, timber key box, timber floor and coloured glass timber framed windows. The original signal lever frame and indicator panel has been replaced with modern electrical equipment, and a small kitchenette has been installed. Some of the original signal frame remains below the floor, accessible by a trap door.

STATION MANAGER'S OFFICE (PLATFORM 3) (c.1944)
External: The station manager's office is a c.1944 blond brick building with subtle detailing, located at the southernmost end of Platform 3. This building was constructed as a Parcels and Booking Office. A vertical brick stringcourse runs the perimeter of the building above the door and window openings, and window and door surrounds feature curved bricks. The building has a corrugated iron gabled roof with a cantilevered steel beam awning on the eastern elevation. The awning drains toward the building, and a large box gutter is located against the eastern wall.

Internal: The interior of the Station Manager's Office is very simple with concrete and lino floors, painted rendered walls and plasterboard ceilings.

LUGGAGE ROOM
A luggage room at the southern end of the main Platform 3 building, although a separate building, is located underneath the extended platform awning. This building is likely to have been moved to this location from elsewhere and estimated to have been installed after 1985. The luggage room is of precast concrete drop panel construction and is an unusual L shape in plan. The building has a flat timber framed roof and a concrete floor, with no internal wall linings. This type of construction was common between 1920-1960s, however the orgins of the building are unknown. The building is in regular use.

STATION BUILDING (PLATFORM 1/2) (c.1992)
On Platform 1/2, there is a modern version of a traditional station building and, while sympathetic to the setting, does not form part of this listing.

PLATFORM SHELTERS (c.1992)
Steel framed platform shelters with a low-pitched gabled roof link the station buildings with the footbridge. The shelters do not form part of this listing.

PLATFORMS (c.1984)
Platform 1/2 is an island platform, whilst Platform 3 is a roadside platform. All platforms have been extensively upgraded, and have a mixture of both paved and asphalt surfaces. Original brick faces are no longer evident, though they may be extant.

FOOTBRIDGE (c.1992)
A modern concrete framed footbridge with gabled steel canopy and three concrete lift towers is located at the northern end of the platform. This visually dominating structure replaced an earlier steel footbridge at the southern end of the platform. The footbridge does not form part of this listing.

LANDSCAPING
While the majority of the area surrounding the Wyong Railway Station is dedicated to carparking, there is an impressive row of Canary Island Date Palms (Phoenix Canariensis), dating from the early 20th century, lining the Pacific Highway.

POTENTIAL ARCHAEOLOGY
The eastern carpark at the station contains remnants of a small weighbridge and may contain remnant evidence of the former goods and stockyards although they are likely to be disturbed.

MOVEABLE
At the station there are located a number of items of moveable heritage including a standard Millner's Patent Fire Resisting safe, indicator boards (both platforms) and an original (or early) luggage trolley. The Wyong Railway Depot, just north of the Howarth Street overbridge (although not able to be inspected) was found to contain several other items of moveable heritage including two original four wheeled luggage carts, a cast iron and timber station bench and an original cast iron WYONG station sign (at the entrance to the depot).
Physical condition and/or
Archaeological potential:
Station Building, including Signal Box (Platform 3) (c.1912) - Good Condition
Station Manager's Office (Platform 3) (c.1940) - Good Condition
Luggage Room - Moderate/Good Condition
Station Building (Platform 1/2) - Good Condition
Platform Shelters - Good Condition
Platforms - Good Condition
Footbridge - Very Good Condition
Landscaping - Good Condition
Archaeological Potential - The former sidings and weighbridge on the southern side of the station may have archaeological potential.
Moveable - Not Assessed
Date condition updated:10 Sep 08
Modifications and dates: 1970s: steam servicing facilities gradually removed from Wyong. Soon after, many local sidings were made redundant
1980s: major upgrading undertaken at Wyong, and that included total replacement of the original station building and platform on the island platform side (Up main line).
1992: construction of a new station building on Platform 1/2, and the extensive alteration of the existing building on Platform 3. Platform shelters were also erected
2010: Platform resurfacing
2012: Removal of palm trees located along Howarth St (outside heritage listing)
Further information: RAILWAY SQUARE SHOPS
Forming the southern end of a square in front of the Railway Station is a group of 5 or 6 shops, dating from 1928. These shops have traditional shop fronts to the square and to the Pacific Highway, beneath a suspended awning and an elaborated rendered castellated parapet. These shops are not in RailCorp ownership but form a valuable part of the railway precinct.

STATION MASTER'S RESIDENCE
The former Station Master's residence is located on the Pacific Highway at the southern end of Platform 3. This building is an attractive single storey painted brick building, dating from the late 19th century, with a corrugated metal roof and a veranda wrapping from the front to the side elevation. The interior was not inspected. It is no longer in RailCorp ownership but forms a valuable part of the railway precinct.
Current use: Railway Station
Former use: Nil

History

Historical notes: The Main Northern line between Sydney and Newcastle was constructed in two distinct stages and in the earliest years, was worked as two separate railway systems. The line between Sydney (actually the junction at Strathfield) and the Hawkesbury River was opened on 5 April 1887, with the terminus being on the southern bank of the Hawkesbury River. The line between Newcastle and the northern bank of the Hawkesbury River (near present day Wondabyne) was opened in January 1888. The line was completed through between Sydney and Newcastle with the opening of the massive bridge over the Hawkesbury River in 1889.

Wyong Railway Station is located on the Main Northern line, between Warnervale and Tuggerah railway stations. On 15 August 1887, Wyong Railway Station was opened, in conjunction with the opening of the Gosford-Wyong section. The construction name was ‘Wyong Creek’.

At the time of opening, Wyong was provided with a single platform on the Down side of the single line, but within two years (and the opening of the Hawkesbury River Bridge), a crossing loop, goods siding and goods shed and signalling and interlocking had been added to the arrangement. By 1899, additional trackwork and sidings had been laid in at Wyong and a number of local industries were served by rail sidings. Stockyards were opened at Wyong on 21 Dec 1905, and were demolished 21 June 1983.

Duplication had been completed by 1912 and the trackwork and number of sidings were substantially increased. Wyong comprised two side platforms with brick station buildings (built in time for the duplication) on each platform. A footbridge was provided at the Sydney-end of the platforms, giving access to the station, and a signal box, part of the station building, was located on the Down platform at the Sydney-end. An original level crossing at the Sydney-end of the yard was replaced by a brick overbridge at the Newcastle-end of the arrangement.

From the 1940s through to the 1960s, the railway arrangements at Wyong increased, with improved track layouts and accommodation for trains. The Up main line platform was converted to an island platform with the refuge loop taken behind the building, and with an additional platform face, allowed passenger trains to terminate. Locomotive sidings and a 75 feet diameter turntable were installed at the Sydney-end of the platforms on the Up side of the line. Locomotive water tanks and columns were added and the signalling and interlocking was improved.

In the 1960 period, automatic signalling was installed in the area, but Wyong signal box retained control over signalling and interlocking in that area.

In the 1970s, steam locomotives were replaced by diesel-electric locomotives and the steam servicing facilities were gradually removed from Wyong. Soon after, many local sidings were made redundant as industries turned to road transport. State-wide, many sidings were removed including those at Wyong.

Electrification of the main line between Gosford and Newcastle was opened in May 1984, an extension of the Sydney-Gosford electrification which had been completed in 1960. The new electrification project involved new or rebuilt platforms, station buildings, footbridges, overbridges and underbridges, line side buildings, sidings and a myriad of structures in that section in order to permit the operation of the wider electric passenger rollingstock and electric locomotives. Accordingly, major upgrading was undertaken at Wyong, and that included total replacement of the original station building and platform on the island platform side (Up main line).

The original station building on the Down main platform has been retained and the signal box is intact although its function has been superseded by a new Signal Control Centre.

The original footbridge between the eastern side and western side of the main lines was demolished and new lifts installed at a new overhead bridge near the centre of the platforms.

The station was further upgraded in 1992 with construction of a new station building on Platform 1/2, and the extensive alteration of the existing building on Platform 3. Platform shelters were also erected.

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Transporting agricultural supplies and machinery-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Communication-Activities relating to the creation and conveyance of information Signalling and safe working-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Impacts of railways on urban form-

Assessment of significance

SHR Criteria a)
[Historical significance]
Wyong Railway Station has historical significance at a local level. Wyong Railway Station has historical importance as an early generator of employment and industry in the district. Historically it was an important local facility for the transport of agricultural goods such as livestock and had a large stockyards and goods shed, although the site no longer demonstrates this aspect of its history.
The station's ability to demonstrate the historic age of rail travel and the operation of a large railway junction is diminished by the extensive removal of sidings and the modern footbridge and awning modifications. It is enhanced by the surviving railway square formed by the station, railway square shops and hotel, which helps to maintain the historic setting of the town centre and the railway station.
SHR Criteria c)
[Aesthetic significance]
Wyong Railway Station has aesthetic significance at a local level. The station forms an integral part of a wider urban railway precinct in a prominent position within the town which includes the station buildings, adjacent shops, established palm trees and former station master's residence. Despite numerous additions which detract greatly from the original form, the main station building (1912) has aesthetic significance as an early twentieth century railway station building with incorporated signal box. The row of palm trees lining the Pacific Highway have been a feature of the station almost since its establishment and have local landmark status.
SHR Criteria d)
[Social significance]
There is evidence of a social attachment within the local community to the Wyong Railway Station. As a centre for rail transport, Wyong had a larger social impact on the town than many other surrounding stations, evidenced by the nearby Railway Institute tennis court which was relocated to its current position on the eastern side of the line in 1951. Such social connections to the station appear to be mainly historic now that the station's role in rail transport has been reduced.
SHR Criteria e)
[Research potential]
The archaeological research potential of the site is low. Disturbed evidence may remain on the eastern side of the main line where the sidings, goods yard, stockyards and weighbridge were located, but it is unlikely to yield significant information not available from other sources.
SHR Criteria f)
[Rarity]
Wyong Railway Station is not rare as there are numerous examples of these types of buildings and similar complexes and many have more integrity than this site. The Railway Square on the western side of the station, bounded by the Railway Station, the Railway Square Shops and the palm trees lining the Pacific Highway, does however create a close relationship between the station and town centre that has not been maintained in many other towns in the metro north region.
SHR Criteria g)
[Representativeness]
Wyong's Railway Station buildings (Platform 3), platforms and setting are representative of structures built at NSW railway stations between 1890 and 1930. None are outstanding examples of their type due to later modifications and a resulting loss of integrity.
Integrity/Intactness: Wyong Railway Station, whilst retaining a certain amount of original intact fabric, has been modified both internally and externally to a large extent and this has resulted in a significant loss of integrity. The construction of a new footbridge and new platform shelters also impacts upon the historic setting of the station. As a whole, the site is considered to have only a moderate degree of integrity. The station's ability to demonstrate the historic age of rail travel and the operation of a large railway junction is diminished by the extensive removal of sidings and stockyards and the modern footbridge and awning modifications. The integrity of the station buildings themselves is considered to be moderate due to the extent of modifications both internally and externally.
Assessment criteria: Items are assessed against the PDF State Heritage Register (SHR) Criteria to determine the level of significance. Refer to the Listings below for the level of statutory protection.

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Heritage Act - s.170 NSW State agency heritage registerSRA s.170 Register    

Study details

TitleYearNumberAuthorInspected byGuidelines used
State Rail Authority Heritage Register Study1999SRA81State Rail Authority  No
S170 Heritage & Conservation Register Update2009 NSW Department of Commerce  Yes

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
WrittenJohn Forsyth. Line Histories
WrittenRay Love2009Historical Research for RailCorp s170 Update
WrittenSingleton C.C. The Short North. ARHS Bulletin. Various issues
WrittenState Rail Authority of New South Wales.1995How and Why of Station Names. Fourth Edition

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

rez rez rez rez rez rez
rez rez rez rez rez rez
rez
(Click on thumbnail for full size image and image details)

Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: State Government
Database number: 4801081


Every effort has been made to ensure that information contained in the State Heritage Inventory is correct. If you find any errors or omissions please send your comments to the Database Manager.

All information and pictures on this page are the copyright of the Heritage Branch or respective copyright owners.