Heritage

Marrickville Railway Station Group

Item details

Name of item: Marrickville Railway Station Group
Type of item: Built
Group/Collection: Transport - Rail
Category: Railway Platform/ Station
Primary address: Illawarra Road, Marrickville, NSW 2204
Parish: Petersham
County: Cumberland
Local govt. area: Marrickville

Boundary:

North: The property boundary along outer rail line, facing Illawarra Road South: The property boundary to Station Street and the rear of properties along Leofrene Ave, but including the access stairs down from Illawarra Road. East: 5 metres from the eastern end of the wayside platform. West: The western edge of the Illawarra Road overbridge but extending south to include the access stairs to Station Street.
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
Illawarra RoadMarrickvilleMarrickvillePetershamCumberlandPrimary Address

Owner/s

Organisation NameOwner CategoryDate Ownership Updated
RailCorpState Government 
RailCorpState Government 
RailCorpState Government 

Statement of significance:

The railway station at Marrickville is significant as it is a station on the Sydenham to Bankstown Line which was constructed to relieve congestion on the Main South Line as well as to encourage suburban development and the growth of agriculture in the late 19th and early 20th century. The highly intact main platform building represents the period of transition from the boom time of the 1880s to the standardisation of NSW railway building design from the 1890s onwards, while the booking office on Platform 2 reflects a later period of expansion in the first quarter of the 20th century.

Marrickville Railway Station is significant at a State level as the platform building demonstrates the high level of aesthetic design of the pre-1900 standard buildings, which included the use of polychromatic brickwork, decorative dentil coursing, ornate awning brackets and carved bargeboards. The platform building is intact and is representative of a small group of such ornate platform buildings including Canterbury and Belmore on the Bankstown Line. The platform building on Platform 2 provides an interesting contrast, demonstrating the simpler design of the standard platform buildings of the 1910/20s.

Also of significance is the intactness of the weatherboard booking office which is unusual for being one of the few examples of a booking office located on a platform with street entry only and no access from the footbridge or overbridge, though the structure itself is representative of a standard design.
Note: There are incomplete details for a number of items listed in NSW. The Heritage Branch intends to develop or upgrade statements of significance and other information for these items as resources become available.

Description

Designer/Maker: NSW Government Railways
Builder/Maker: Alexander Scouller
Construction years: 1894-1895
Physical description: BUILDINGS
Platform building, Platform 1- (Type 11) (1895)
Platform building, Platform 2- (Type 11) (1911)
Booking Office, Platform 2 (1917)

STRUCTURES
Platforms: Platform 1, (1895) - Platform 2, (1911)
Pedestrian steps: southern set, (mid 1980s) - northern set, (1917)
Overbridge- Illawarra Road, (1911)

CONTEXT
Marrickville railway station consists of one wayside platform (Platform 2) to the south and an island platform (Platform 1) to the north. Passenger rail only uses the south side of the island platform, with the Metropolitan Goods Line running on the north. The station buildings are original, as is the booking office at the western end of Platform 2. The station is accessed via the stairs from the Illawarra Road overbridge and via a second set of stairs on the south which give access to Platform 2. Illawarra Road is a major commercial shopping strip.

PLATFORM BUILDING- Platform 1 (1895)
External: Rectangular polychromatic face brick building with gabled roof and surrounding cantilevered awning clad in corrugated roof sheeting. The face brick is in stretcher bond, with dark brick walls and lighter salmon coloured bricks forming a dado, framing the upper half of the windows and doors and with a diamond pattern dentil course at the high level. The building is eight bays in length, with the bays defined by engaged brick piers which coincide with the awning brackets. Original chimneys with cement mouldings and terracotta flues remain but have been painted.

The cantilever awning is on filigreed steel brackets supported on decorative cement capped brick engaged piers and bolt fixings to the station building brick walls. The soffit lining is the underside of the corrugated steel roof fixed to intermediate exposed purlins. There is a decorative timber moulding at the junction with the brick wall. The awning returns around both ends of the building and at the stair end becomes a canopy supported on timber posts. The awning edges are finished with a decorative timber boarded valance.

The external walls rise from a projecting brick plinth (now painted) with a decorative two part cement dado moulding which frames the salmon brick dado and is continuous between door and window openings. Decorative cement window and door frames rise above the dado moulding, each with a decorative keystone.

The original window and door openings have segmental arches and the windows feature a decorative moulded cement sill. The original timber windows were double hung with a double paned lower sash and a multi-paned upper sash featuring coloured glass. Much of the original coloured window glass as well as the original fanlights above the door openings remain on the southern side but several have been bricked up on the goods line side. The doors were timber panelled but most have been removed or, on the northern side, bricked up. The end brick gables feature a louvre within a round brick window frames in salmon coloured voussoir shaped bricks with four cement keystones.

Internal: The building comprises a booking hall, still accessible via the original set of double doors at the bottom of the stairs; a booking office; Station Masters room; general waiting room; ladies room and ladies toilets, a store and men’s toilets. The internal usage has now changed and the toilets have modern fitouts and finishes. Original plaster wall finishes and plaster ceilings and ceiling roses remain in the general waiting room, the ladies waiting room, and ladies toilets as well as the Station Masters room.

PLATFORM BUILDING- Platform 2 (1911)
External: Rectangular face brick building with gabled roof and integral shallower sloped single cantilevered awning. The face brick is in stretcher bond and the building is four bays in length, with the bays defined by engaged brick piers which coincide with the awning supports. The original chimney with cement mouldings and terracotta flue has been removed.

The cantilever awning is on standard double bowed steel brackets supported on decorative cement haunches and bolt fixings to the station building brick walls. The soffit lining of corrugated steel is fixed to intermediate exposed purlins and follows the roof slope. There is a decorative timber moulding at the junction with the brick wall. Vertical timber boards form a valance at each end of awning. The awning roof as for the main roof is corrugated steel.

The external walls rise from a projecting brick plinth four courses high with a decorative dado moulding run in cement which is continuous between door and window openings. Decorative cement window and door frames rise above the dado moulding. The rear or southern side of the building reflects the same detailing.

The original window openings feature a moulded cement sill with a scalloped fringe. The original timber windows were double hung with a single paned lower sash and a six paned upper sash which featured coloured glass. Most of the original window glass as well as the upper glazing bars remain but have been obscured by the installation of vandal proof fibreglass sheeting. Original door openings featured fanlights matching the upper window sashes, which have also been removed. One original timber panelled door remains. The rear of the building has been painted and all the window openings bricked up.

Internal: The building comprises a general waiting room; ladies room and ladies toilets, a store and men’s Toilets. Not accessible.

BOOKING OFFICE (1917)
The original timber framed overhead booking office dating from 1895 was demolished and the existing timber framed booking office located on Platform 2 built in 1917-18. The building is a simple, rectangular weatherboard clad timber framed structure, with a gable roof clad in corrugated steel which extends as an awning with exposed rafters on the platform side. Originally the roof extended to the east over the open public space and ticket collection booth, but this has been replaced by a later gabled awning structure on timber posts. Externally the original ticket window survives as does two of the original timber double hung windows; the door has been replaced by a flush type.

Internal: Internally much of the fabric survives including the timber lining boards, the timber boarded ceiling and the built in desk and cupboards, although it would appear much of this dates from the alterations and additions of the mid 1940s.

PLATFORMS
Platform 1 has an asphalt surface with the original brick face and edge. The northern side of this platform (not used and fenced off) has a brick edge with the original brick face. Platform 2 also has its original brick face but with a concrete edge.

OVERBRIDGE (1911)
Steel girders and a concrete slab supported on central brick piers and side brick abutments. The original access stairs from the overbridge to Platform 1 have the original steel stringers but have new concrete treads and a new steel balustrade. The later stairs on the south were constructed from steel stringers supported on steel columns and with precast concrete treads.
Physical condition and/or
Archaeological potential:
PLATFORM BUILDINGS
Generally both in good condition.

BOOKING OFFICE
Good condition.

PLATFORMS
Generally good condition.

OVERBRIDGE
Good condition.
Date condition updated:30 Apr 09
Modifications and dates: 1917: Line quadrupled (for goods line), platform lengthened and new Up platform built.
1926: Railway electrified.
1944: Alterations to booking office on Platform 2
1985: New stairs (southern set) down from Illawarra Road
Current use: Railway Station
Former use: Nil

History

Historical notes: Marrickville is located on the Sydenham to Bankstown Railway which was opened as far as Belmore on 1 February 1895. The line had its origins in Railway Commissioner Goodchap’s 1882 recommendation that an additional line was needed between Newtown and Liverpool to relieve traffic on the Southern Line and to encourage agriculture and suburban settlement. Lobbying by local interests and land speculators achieved Parliamentary approval by 1890 and construction commenced in 1892. The most important stations on the line, Belmore, Canterbury and Marrickville, were built with impressive near-identical brick buildings, the other intermediate stations (Campsie, Dulwich Hill and Hurlstone Park) receiving more modest timber buildings (later replaced), possibly reflecting economies of the depression of the 1890s. The depression suppressed the profitability of the line and the extension to Liverpool did not proceed. However, suburban development followed in the early twentieth century, particularly during the interwar period when many War Service homes were built west of Canterbury. The line was extended to Bankstown in 1909 (and then to Regents Park in 1928, making it part of a loop line through Lidcombe), its justification by then being the servicing of suburban development.

Some changes were made to the station layout with construction of the Metropolitan Goods Line in 1917. A new Up platform and building were built with overhead booking office, and the Up side of the island platform was withdrawn from use as one of the goods lines now passed it.

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Transport-Activities associated with the moving of people and goods from one place to another, and systems for the provision of such movements Making Railway Journeys-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Impacts of railways on urban form-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Evolution of design in railway architecture-

Assessment of significance

SHR Criteria a)
[Historical significance]
Marrickville Railway Station has historical significance as it is one of the railway stations on the Sydenham to Bankstown Line built to relieve the crowding on the Main Southern Line and encourage agriculture and suburban growth in the late 1800s and early 20th century. The brick building on Platform 1 represents that period which marked the transition from the boom period of the 1880s to the standardisation of NSW Railways building design of the 1890s and onwards, while the booking office on Platform 2 represents a later period of expansion in the first quarter of the 20th century
SHR Criteria c)
[Aesthetic significance]
The platform building on Platform 1 at Marrickville Station has state aesthetic and technical significance because it exemplifies the particular design and style of brick island buildings erected by the NSW Railways prior to 1900 which possessed high qualities of aesthetic features such as polychromatic brickwork, dentilled brick cornices and cement mouldings which distinguish it from other platform building types. The booking office on Platform 2 has local aesthetic and technical significance because it exemplifies the particular design and style of timber booking structures erected by the NSW Railways between 1910 and the 1950s.
SHR Criteria d)
[Social significance]
The place has the potential to contribute to the local community's sense of place and can provide a connection to the local community's history.
SHR Criteria e)
[Research potential]
The timber booking office is significant because of its relative intactness, including much of the original internal timber fixtures, as well its location on the platform rather than overhead, providing the opportunity for further understanding of the design of these building types constructed between the years 1910-1950s.
SHR Criteria f)
[Rarity]
While the two platform buildings are well represented in other railway stations, the timber framed weatherboard clad booking office on Platform 2 is significant for being one of the few examples in the Metropolitan Area of a booking office building located on a platform which has a separate road level entry and is not accessible from the footbridge or overbridge.
SHR Criteria g)
[Representativeness]
The building on Platform 1 is representative of the high architectural quality of the pre-1900 standard station building which marked the transition from the boom period of the 1880s to the standardisation of the 1890s. It’s styling reflected the importance of the station at that time , the other important stations on the Bankstown line with the same design being Canterbury and Belmore. The standard design building on Platform 2 is representative of the type of common design utilised by the railways during the 1910/20s. The booking office on Platform 2 is representative of the type of timber construction employed in booking office design dating from 1910 to the 1950s.
Integrity/Intactness: PLATFORM BUILDING (Platform 1)
External: The level of integrity is good compared with other platform buildings on the Bankstown Line. Original face brick chimneys remain but have been painted. Lower face brick plinth has been painted. Original windows retain much of the coloured glass in the upper sashes but in most windows have been replaced by diamond pattern reinforced fibreglass sheeting in the lower sashes. Some windows have expanded mesh fixed on face of brickwork. Several windows have been bricked up on the north elevation. Doors retain much original glass in the fanlights, but several original panelled doors have been replaced by modern flush doors. One door is bricked up on the north elevation.

Internal: Original plaster wall finishes and plaster ceilings and ceiling roses remain in the Station Masters room, general waiting room, ladies room and ladies toilets. The toilet fitouts are modern.

PLATFORM BUILDING (Platform 2)
External: The level of integrity is low compared to that of the building on Platform 1. The original face brick chimneys has been removed. Original windows retain some of the coloured glass in the sashes but in all windows have been covered by diamond pattern reinforced fibreglass sheeting. All windows have been bricked up on the south elevation and the entire face brick wall painted. One timber panelled door remains and one is a modern flush door.

BOOKING OFFICE
External: The level of integrity is good. Original timber weatherboards remain as well as the exposed timber rafters and roofing battens. The ticket window remains as do the original timber double hung windows. The access door has been replaced by a modern flush type.

Internal: Timber wall lining boards remain, as does the timber boarded ceiling, original metal ventilators remain. The timber fixtures including ticket counter and most of the internal shelving from the 1944 alterations still remain.

OVERBRIDGE
The level of integrity is good. Original brick abutments and steel beams remain. The access stair down from the overbridge retains its original steel stringers but the treads are modern concrete as is the balustrade.
Assessment criteria: Items are assessed against the PDF State Heritage Register (SHR) Criteria to determine the level of significance. Refer to the Listings below for the level of statutory protection.

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Heritage Act - s.170 NSW State agency heritage registerSRA s.170 Register    
Heritage studyMarrickville Railway Station    

Study details

TitleYearNumberAuthorInspected byGuidelines used
State Rail Authority Heritage Register Study1999SRA91State Rail Authority  No
Heritage and Conservation Register State Rail Authority of NSW1993245Paul Davies for SRA  No
S170 Heritage & Conservation Register Update2009 OCP Architects  Yes

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
WrittenJohn Forsyth2007New South Wales Railway Stations: an alphabetical arrangement of railway station and place names
WrittenK. Edwards1982Beginning the Bankstown Line: a history of the Marrickville to Burwood Road Railway
WrittenTony Prescott2009Historical Research for RailCorp's S170 Update Project

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

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Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: State Government
Database number: 4801091


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