Heritage

Eryldene

Item details

Name of item: Eryldene
Type of item: Complex / Group
Group/Collection: Residential buildings (private)
Category: House
Location: Lat: -33.7580293684 Long: 151.1575905390
Primary address: 17 McIntosh Street, Gordon, NSW 2072
Parish: Gordon
County: Cumberland
Local govt. area: Ku-Ring-Gai
Property description
Lot/Volume CodeLot/Volume NumberSection NumberPlan/Folio CodePlan/Folio Number
LOT1 DP34650
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
17 McIntosh StreetGordonKu-Ring-GaiGordonCumberlandPrimary Address

Owner/s

Organisation NameOwner CategoryDate Ownership Updated
The Eryldene TrustCommunity Group 

Statement of significance:

Eryldene is of outstanding cultural significance being the most intact surviving example of the work of William Hardy Wilson, the prominent early twentieth century Australian architect, artist, writer and advocate of the Colonial Revival style. It comprises a residence, complementary outbuildings and garden setting, reflective of the close similarity of interests of both architect and client, Professor E G Waterhouse. The garden was developed by its owner to a remarkable individual character and was the setting for his world-renowned efforts in developing the nomenclature and hybridisation of camellias. It remains a resource for their study. The house, gardens and outbuildings are significantly intact, with some room settings retaining their original furnishings and detail (Moore et.al 1988:17).

The place is also of considerable aesthetic significance for its demonstration of an exemplary example of a garden as an extension of a house, with a series of open air rooms carefully furnished with trees, shrubs and flowers, superbly proportioned garden structures (temple, garden study, teahouse/tennis pavilion, fountain, pigeon-house)(Read, S., Heritage Office, 2004).
Date significance updated: 12 Jun 07
Note: There are incomplete details for a number of items listed in NSW. The Heritage Branch intends to develop or upgrade statements of significance and other information for these items as resources become available.

Description

Designer/Maker: William Hardy Wilson
Builder/Maker: Rudolph G. Ochs
Construction years: 1913-1936
Physical description: GARDEN
The garden is geometrically, but not formally planned. A wooden picket fence and tightly clipped hedge, screen the garden from the street. An irregularly flagged path, edged by garden beds, leads to the stone front steps, flanked with iron railings.

The entrance path separates the front garden into two lawned areas. On the left stands an open octagonal summerhouse of slim mid 19th century cast iron columns, supporting a pitched roof with terracotta shingles. In the same position at the rear of the house stands a pigeon house, a garden study and a fountain.

To the right at the front is a lawn area, garden seat and whitewashed terracotta pots with large camellias and azaleas in it, the driveway at the western side to a single garage behind the house. To the right at the rear is an area of shrubbery, and a lawn tennis court entered through a moon gate set in the wire netting fence, and a Chinese tea house / Tennis Pavilion set between a pair of ornamental flag poles on the south-western boundary. Chinese ornaments and bowls are found throughout the garden. (Moore et.al. 1988: 72, amended Read, S., Heritage Office, 2004)

Large trees include a jacaranda at the front of the house on the left hand side, carefully pruned to accentuate the shadow effects of its branch tracery on the house's walls and large Sydney red gums (Angophora costata) at the rear. An original line of Lombardy poplars along the front fence has since been removed and replaced by African olive (Olea europaea var. Africana) hedging and native cypress pines (Callitris sp. - C.columellaris / C.rhomboidea) as vertical elements.

The garden has an impressive collection of ornamental camellias (C. japonica and C.sasanqua cultivars), gathered by Professor Waterhouse over some years as a passion. Waterhouse bred hybrids, and was a renowened expert on camellia classification and naming. Many of the camellia shrubs in the garden have their original name labels on them, some in Japanese/Chinese characters as well as English. An example is the Camellia japonica 'Altheiflora' a blood red small semi-double flowered cultivar, with ruffled petals. (Read, S., pers. Comm., 2004)

Throughout the garden careful use of axes, view manipulation, suggestion, surprise and architectural elements to 'stop' views, or provide ornamental features along pathways have been carefully placed and maintained. (amended: Read, S., Heritage Office, 2004)

HOUSE
Eryldene is a single storey brick house. Its design is an adaption of Georgian Architecture to Australian conditions. A central path, edged by garden beds, leads to the stone front steps, flanked with iron railings. The verandah with its six beechwood columns and white railings consists of three well proportioned areas, terminated at each end by a weatherboard sleep-out bedroom. The roof is of shingle tiles with generous eaves. At the rear is a courtyard with a colonnade of Doric iron columns. (Simpson 1976)
Physical condition and/or
Archaeological potential:
Generally the house and its contents are in good to excellent condition. The original furniture contents in the drawing room and dining room remain in situ. The original furniture and contents in the Garden Study remain in situ.
Archaeological potential is negligable.
Modifications and dates: 1913 house and temple, des. Wm.Hardy Wilson; builder Rudolph Ochs
1921-2 Garden Study, fountain and pigeon-house, des. Wm.Hardy Wilson (interior by John L Berry), garden shed, des. John L Berry
1924 - Tea house and Moon Gate
1927 Tea House, des. Wm.Hardy Wilson, builder W A Farr
1936 Garage, des. possibly Stacey A Neave, lattice screen (west of house), des. possibly R Keith Harris, Moon Gate (R Keith Harris)

1991 - change of use approved, for community purposes (House museum)
1993 - rotten front verandah floor boards repaired/patched, interior and exterior painting, including kitchen & laundry, bathroom, butler's pantry and ceiling of custodian's bedroom, bath enamel refinished, security system installed
1998 - refurbishment of 1921 garden study fountain, installation of a pump and water treatment apparatus, replaced front fence
2000 - repaired garden chair, plumbing pipes and fittings, water pipes outside kitchen replaced.
2001-2 - painting of chimneys, roof repairs above kitchen, repairs to watering system, broken sewer replaced
2002 - garden seat restored with $ from Australian Garden History Society. Original fruiting olive tree in front garden (west) on axis opposite the Garden Temple died. A sprout arose from its roots, off axis, and the decision was taken to retain this.

2003 two ceilings restored in Garden Study, and front verandah of house (including roof structure repair), new copper gutters and downpipes erected on Garden Study, house and Garage, foundations to Garden Study entry repaired, existing roof tiles re-laid, conservation of Garden Temple, trellis on western side of the house
2004 repointing sandstone base of House

2005 fumigation of furniture & rugs (borer & weevils), spraying regime in place for azalea fungi & lace bugs, collection of garden photographs (c.1985-2000) purchased, Trust records lodged in Ku-Ring-Gai library, catalogue of collection (furniture, garden furniture, original fabric, artefacts, memorabilia, paintings, photos, papers, documents, books, magazines, newspapers etc (work was begun in 2004, with an MFArts grant), Pigeon House re-roofed and repaired, front of house lime wash restored, timber railings painted, garage doors and lime washed walls of garden study to be done summer 05/6, tallow wood verandah/eastern loggia flooring repaired/replaced where decayed - ie full length of front verandah floor now repaired. Work commenced on restoring 2 chairs once in the internal study and main bedroom. Also repairs to small broken table in drawing room, and 14th century Persian bowl in garden study. (Eryldene newsletter, October 2005)

2005-6 Painting, repairs to roofing, eaves and flooring, fumigation of borer and weevil infestations, restoration of artefacts and furniture undertaken. Large number of Professor Waterhouse's books gifted back to the Trust. Project completed establishing a catalogue framework, informing the ongoing volunteer detailed cataloguing work of the collection. (Newsletter April 2006)
Further information: 2002/3 Federal Heritage CHPP grant of $19,580 awarded for conservation works.
Current use: house museum
Former use: Family residence of Professor E.G and Mrs J. Waterhouse

History

Historical notes: The real spirit of the 20th century came to Australian architecture with the domestic work of a quartet of practitioners after the First World War. Between them they encompassed all the virtues and the vices, the strengths and the weaknesses which have marked the last 50 years...The only thing they had in common was a conviction that architectural thinking had to start at a more basic level than anything that had been known for a hundred years...

The group of thinking-architects responsible for ushering in the 20th century were Hardy Wilson, Robin Dods, Harold Desbrowe-Annear and Walter Burley Griffin. They worked in different places and they worked individually...But between them they covered most of the ideas and attitudes that followed. Because, with the exception of Griffin, they worked almost exclusively on houses, their effect was strongest on domestic work. The same depth of thought and changes which they brought to homes did not begin to percolate into other types of building, which merely acquired from them the vices of individualism to compound their blatant stylism, for another 40 years.

William Hardy Wilson:
William (later Hardy) Wilson had been born in Sydney in 1881. His search for architectural truth, a deep love and appreciation of beauty, an interest in history and an abiding faith in the concept of the artist-architect led him to strive for the pre-Victorian virtues. But his was not mere copyism. Sensitive to the underlying qualities of colonial architecture, he sought to apply their timeless principles to his own work (Freeland, 1982, 236-8).

In 1905 Wilson went to England and enrolled in the Architectural Association School of Architecture in London and also worked a a draftsman for William Flockhart in Bond Street. The chief draftsman in that office, Leonard Rothrie, introduced him to the Chelsea Art Club, where he met English sculptor Francis Derwent Ward and Scottish painter George Henry, as well as Australian artists including Tom Roberts, Arthur Streeton and George Lambert.

In 1908 Wilson and Stacy Neave (another architect from Sydney) commenced their grand tourt of Europe and North America, where they found the work of McKim, Mead & White and the American Colonial Revival style particularly impressive. It was during this tour that Wilson realised the influence of geography was crucial to the development of art and architecture.

In 1911 Wilson changed his name legally to William Hardy Wilson and joined Neave to form Wilson & Neave. When Neave served in World War 1, Wilson closed the practice and concentrated on writing and completing his drawings of old colonial architeture in NSW and Tasmania and building his own house, Purulia (completed 1916)(Edwards, 2013, 768).

The positioning of the summer house at Purulia, on the cross-axis of the central path and diagonally to the right of the front door, is similar to the positioning of the more sophistocated one at Eryldene. The simple stone-flagged central path is common to all the gardens, yet it is a cottage detail, not found in the old colonial gardens of the County of Cumberland which Wilson knew. (Broadbent, in National Trust of Australia (NSW), 1980, 65-70).

Another notable Wilson designed house of this era was Macquarie Cottage, Pymble (1919) for H.Dunstan Vane (Edwards, 2013, 769).

In 1920 Wilson & Neave took on John Berry as partner, becoming Wilson, Neave & Berry (1920-27), a firm noted for the Colonial Revival style of architecture for domestic design: fat, low-squatting Georgian boxes with colonnaded verandahs, spider-web fanlights on entrance doors and multi-paned windows with shutters. The firms style followed the Colonial Revival based on the United States idiom, but also looked to Australian colonial architecture for inspiration. This style became very popular in the 1920s (Edwards, 2013, 770).

In 1921 Wilson went to China and took lessons in Chinese painting under Kungpah King (Jin Chen); his travels to China's major cities, Peking (Beijing), Hangzhou, Shanghai, Canton (Guangshou) and Macao had a profound influence in his architectural philosophy and design (ibid, 769).

After Wilson's visit to China in 1921, the firm incorporated Oriental motifs and details, examples of which are found at Eryldene, Gordon (1914-36) and Peapes Department Store, Sydney (1923)(ibid, 770).

In 1922 Wilson sold Purulia and travelled to England and Europe, where, in Vienna, he supervised the collotype reproductions for 'Colonial architeture in NSW and Tasmania' (1924), his publication that would foster great interest in an Australian Colonial Revival.

In 1925 Wilson returned to Sydney, where he became disillusioned with the state of Australian architecture and began writing his view sand ideas in a fictionalised biography 'The dawn of a new civilisation' (1929) under a pseudonym of Richard Le Mesurer.

In 1927 he completed his last design - the tennis pavilion (later called the Tea House) at Eryldene in Gordon for Prof. E.G. and Janet Waterhouse - the epitome of 'a new style in architecture, the development in one style of Chinese and European classic', retired from practice and left for England (Edwards, 2013, 769, 770).

Eryldene was built in 1913-1914 for Professor Eben(ezer) Gowrie (E.G.) and Mrs Janet Waterhouse and named after the house in Kilmarnock, Scotland where they married. Designed by William Hardy Wilson, it reflects his interest in the Georgian Revival style of architecture, adapted for Australian conditions. Professor Waterhouse also had a distinct influence upon the design of the house and is responsible for the simple hipped roof now apparent, rather than the gables often favoured by Wilson.

Professor E. G. Waterhouse was a linguist and from 1924 the Professor of German at Sydney University, as well as being an avid gardener at his home, Eryldene and (later) a leading world authority on camellias. Eryldene's garden was increasingly a collection of camellias, many that he'd collected in Japan and China and all individually labelled, bilingually.

The garden was designed by both Wilson and Waterhouse. Conceived as an extension of the house with particular 'rooms', it was to become an expression of Waterhouse's individual character. It is now well known for its introduction of camellias back into the twentieth century garden.

In seeking out and drawing the buildings for his 'Old Colonial Architecture in New South Wales and Tasmania', Hardy Wilson became aware of the siting and gardens of early colonial houses. He was the first to recognise and appreciate a characteristic mid-19th century style of gardening in New South Wales. For nearly 50 years his was the only voice stressing its importance and his descriptions - as vivid and full blown as the late summer gardens he visited - are still the most evocative. Wilson looked at these gardens with a painter's eye, not the analytical eye of a designer. He was neither botanist not horticulturist. He appreciated their siting, colour and texture rather than their layout and details...

Of large forest trees he admired only the picturesque angophora (A.floribunda or A.subvelutina), the 'apple oak' of the colonists...; and, presumably the turpentines (Syncarpia glomulifera) which he planted along the rear boundaries of Purulia. He designed 5 gardens: Eryldene (Gordon), Purulia, Macquarie Cottage (Pymble), a garden for 'An Ideal Australian Home' and for a 'Standard Cottage' for the William Moore Trust at Gordon. The latter were not carried out. Purulia and Macquarie Cottage have been altered. Eryldene presents a problem as in its final form it displays so much the taste and horticultural expertise of its owner, Professor Waterhouse, that Wilson's contribution is difficult to assess, and since it predates the other gardens, the influence of 'Professor Pymble' on these should be considered. The similarities between all Wilson's garden plans are marked.

From his love and knowledge of colonial gardens came his choice of plants. The range is limited, but it contrasts with the ubiquitous palms, brush box and hybrid roses of contemporary gardens as stringkingly as his unbroken colour-washed walls contrasted with the redness of his neighbours' 'multangular villas'.

Waterhouse managed to acquire 12 advanced Camellia japonica cultivar (cv.) plants 3 - 4 feet high in 1914 and planted six in the garden at Eryldene: two at the front gate, two in front of the garden temple, and two in the courtyard; and gave six to Hardy Wilson. This is mentioned in the book "E G Waterhouse of Eryldene" by Mary Armati (Fine Arts Press 1977) reprinted by the Eryldene Trust 2004, p37 which says:
'...he did not share the prevailing attitude towards camellias. Although they were copletely out of fashion and difficult to obtain, he was greatly taken by their beauty and dignity. In 1914 he managed to acquire twelve advanced plants, 3 to 4 feet high, kept six for the garden he was planning and building at Eryldene and gave the remaining six to Hardy Wilson. He was already on the camellia trail.'
This quote was read and approved by him before his death in 1977 (Penny Holden, pers.comm., 3/8/12).

In the early 1920s he was asked by the vice chancellor of Sydney University, Professor McCallum, to lay out a garden in the Vice Chancellor's courtyard. Here he planted a number of twenty year old azaleas, some fuchias and some camellias (Holden, 2012, pers.comm.).

The camellia had been the subject of a 'rage' in gardening and botanical circles between its first 'discovery' and export to the west. By the 1870s Australia was at the cutting edge of Camellia hybridisation and cultivar naming, along with England, Antwer/Belgian and Florence/Italian breeding. By the 1890s camellias were waning in popularity, starting a slide lasting till the 1930s. Waterhouse's interest from 1914 was well before 1937, when English writer Sacheverell Sitwell's book 'Old Fashioned Flowers' included camellias, leading to a revival in growing them (Read, 2012).

In 1921 a garden retreat was built for the Professor's use. The curved wall and fountain in sandstone outside (east of) the garden retreat/ study was designed by Hardy Wilson and built in 1921. The glass fronted bookcases inside were designed by Wilson's partner, John L. Berry. In 1924, after a trip to China, the professor commissioned the design and construction of a tea house and 'Moon Gate' as an adjunct to the tennis court.

In 1939 Waterhouse established the Camellia Grove Nursery, originally in St.Ives but now at 8 Cattai Ridge Road, Glenorie.

In 1950 Waterhouse with Sydney nurseryman Walter Hazlewood, Alex Jessup (former Director, Royal Botanic Gardens, Melbourne) and Dr Merrilees, founded the Australian Camellia Research Society. This has a worldwide membership of 1500 and in partnership with Sutherland Shire Council and the Sutherland Orchid Society was responsible for establishment of the E.G.Waterhouse National Camellia Gardens as a Bicentennial project in 1970 with Sutherland Shire Council (Read, 2012).

The genus was named (i.e. published) by the great Carl Linne (Linnaeus) in 1735, in his Systema Naturae, for a plant described in (surgeon to the Dutch East India Company, Engelbert) Kaempfer's Amoenitatum Exoticarum 1712. More species have been 'discovered', exported and named since as investigation has continued in China, Japan, Burma and Indo-China. Vietnam is yielding more species, including purple-flowered, in recent years. The name was in honour of Jesuit apothecary and naturalist from Moravia (now Czech Republic) Georg Josef Kamel, who worked in the Philippines in the early 18th century.

The most important species are C.japonica and C.sasanqua (first 'discovered' in Japan but the former also native to Korea, and both long cultivated in China) and C.reticulata from China. Species used recently in inter-specific hybridising which have produced some excellent cultivars are C.saluenensis, C.pitardii var.yunnanica, C.granthamiana and C.fraterna (Read, 2012).

With the death of Professor Waterhouse in 1977, ownership eventually reverted to the Eryldene Trust in 1979. Conservation work was undertaken between 1982 and 1983 and provisions were made to accommodate a resident custodian. The house is now open to the public (since 1991) as an exhibition space and open garden (Moore et.al., 1988, 3-5).

In seeking out and drawing the buildings for his 'Old Colonial Architecture in New South Wales and Tasmania', Hardy Wilson became aware of the siting and gardens of early colonial houses. He was the first to recognise and appreciate a characteristic mid-19th century style of gardening in New South Wales. For nearly 50 years his was the only voice stressing its importance and his descriptions - as vivid and full blown as the late summer gardens he visited - are still the most evocative. Wilson looked at these gardens with a painter's eye, not the analytical eye of a designer. He was neither botanist not horticulturist. He appreciated their siting, colour and texture rather than their layout and details...

Of large forest trees he admired only the picturesque angophora (A.floribunda or A.subvelutina), the 'apple oak' of the colonists...; and, presumably the turpentines (Syncarpia glomulifera) which he planted along the rear boundaries of Purulia. He designed 5 gardens: Eryldene (Gordon), Purulia, Macquarie Cottage (Pymble), a garden for 'An Ideal Australian Home' and for a 'Standard Cottage' for the William Moore Trust at Gordon. The latter were not carried out. Purulia and Macquarie Cottage have been altered. Eryldene presents a problem as in its final form it displays so much the taste and horticultural expertise of its owner, Professor Waterhouse, that Wilson's contribution is difficult to assess, and since it predates the other gardens, the influence of 'Professor Pymble' on these should be considered. The similarities between all Wilson's garden plans are marked.

From his love and knowledge of colonial gardens came his choice of plants. The range is limited, but it contrasts with the ubiquitous palms, brush box and hybrid roses of contemporary gardens as stringkingly as his unbroken colour-washed walls contrasted with the redness of his neighbours' 'multangular villas'.

Wilson planned his gardens with layouts of an easy, but nevertheless rigorously applied formal geometry, which owes little to colonial or contemporary English garden design (to which Wilson makes no reference in any of his writings). They are unmistakably gardens designed by an architect who, though admiring the architectural work of Lutyens, probably knew little of current English gardens.

The positioning of the summer house at Purulia, on the cross-axis of the central path and diagonally to the right of the front door, is similar to the positioning of the more sophistocated one at Eryldene. The simple stone-flagged central path is common to all the gardens, yet it is a cottage detail, not found in the old colonial gardens of the County of Cumberland which Wilson knew (Broadbent, in National Trust, 1980, 65-70).

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Landscapes of urban amenity-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Landscapes and gardens of domestic accommodation-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Landscapes of contemplation and devotion-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Gardens demonstrating the travels and sojurns of a gardener-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Gardens and landscapes reminiscent of an 'old country'-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Landscapes demonstrating styles in landscape design-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. (none)-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Gentlemens Mansions-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Urban landscapes inspiring creative responses-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Creating landmark structures and places in urban settings-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Creating works of art-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Designing landscapes in an exemplary style-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Building in response to climate - verandahs-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Landscaping - Federation period-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Creating an icon-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Landscaping - 20th century interwar-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Architectural styles and periods - Interwar Georgian revival-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Designing in an exemplary architectural style-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Visiting heritage places-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Enjoying public parks and gardens-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups (none)-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Professor E G Waterhouse, linguist, orientalist-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Mr. Foden, English multi-industrialist-

Assessment of significance

SHR Criteria a)
[Historical significance]
Eryldene has historical significance through its association with Professor E.G.Waterhouse who had a distinguished career in linguistics, arts and horticulture. It is also, arguably, the most significant surviving residence designed by William Hardy, celebrated for his influence on Australian architecture in the first half of the twentieth century. (Moore et.al. 1988: 15)
SHR Criteria c)
[Aesthetic significance]
At all levels Eryldene is a sophisticated design entitiy, aimed at achieving a rare harmony of beauty and utility. It was created for the specific purpose of introducing aesthetic experience into the daily lives of its inhabitants and their visitors. It is one of the earliest, most complex and developed examples of the the Colonial Revival style of architecture and the most complete example of its designers work remaining. (Moore et.al. 1988: 16-17)
SHR Criteria d)
[Social significance]
Eryldene is not only a focus for admirers of Professor Waterhouse's life and works, it is also a remarkable evocation of a way of life and philosophy of living, increasingly remote from contemporary society. It also reflects cultured, intellectual life in Sydney from the First World War to the Modern period. (Moore et.al. 1988: 16)
SHR Criteria e)
[Research potential]
The camellia collection at Eryldene, remains living, evoloving evidence of the Professor's contribution to the nomenclature and hybridisation of Camellias and a resource for the future study of the genus. (Moore et.al. 1988: 15)
Integrity/Intactness: The house, gardens and outbuidings are significantly intact, with some room settings retaining their original furnishings and detail.
Assessment criteria: Items are assessed against the PDF State Heritage Register (SHR) Criteria to determine the level of significance. Refer to the Listings below for the level of statutory protection.

Recommended management:

Recommendations

Management CategoryDescriptionDate Updated
Recommended ManagementReview a Conservation Management Plan (CMP) 
Recommended ManagementPrepare a maintenance schedule or guidelines 

Procedures /Exemptions

Section of actDescriptionTitleCommentsAction date
57(2)Exemption to allow workStandard Exemptions SCHEDULE OF STANDARD EXEMPTIONS
HERITAGE ACT 1977
Notice of Order Under Section 57 (2) of the Heritage Act 1977

I, the Minister for Planning, pursuant to subsection 57(2) of the Heritage Act 1977, on the recommendation of the Heritage Council of New South Wales, do by this Order:

1. revoke the Schedule of Exemptions to subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act made under subsection 57(2) and published in the Government Gazette on 22 February 2008; and

2. grant standard exemptions from subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977, described in the Schedule attached.

FRANK SARTOR
Minister for Planning
Sydney, 11 July 2008

To view the schedule click on the Standard Exemptions for Works Requiring Heritage Council Approval link below.
Sep 5 2008
57(2)Exemption to allow workHeritage Act - Site Specific Exemptions HERITAGE ACT 1977

ORDER UNDER SECTION 57(2)
TO GRANT SITE SPECIFIC EXEMPTIONS FROM APPROVAL

Eryldene, 17 McIntosh Street, Gordon (SHR No. 19)

I, the Minister for Heritage, on the recommendation of the Heritage Council of New South Wales, in pursuance of section 57(2) of the Heritage Act 1977, do, by this my order, grant an exemption from section 57(1) of that Act in respect of the engaging in or carrying out of any activities described in Schedule “C” by the owner described in Schedule “B” on the item described in Schedule “A”.



The Hon Robyn Parker, MP
Minister for Heritage

Sydney, Day of 2013


SCHEDULE “A”

The item known as Eryldene, situated on the land described in Schedule “B”.


SCHEDULE “B”

All those pieces or parcels of land known as Lot 1 DP 34650 in Parish of Gordon, County of Cumberland shown on the plan catalogued HC 188 in the office of the Heritage Council of New South Wales.

SCHEDULE “C”

1) Venue hire of the garden, lawn court, teahouse, verandah and loggias for events deemed by Eryldene Trust’s Director to be appropriate and compatible with the significance and fabric of Eryldene house, outbuildings and gardens (in accordance with Eryldene Trust’s guidelines: Venue Hire Agreement and Protocol for Use);

2) Staging of concerts/performances in garden, lawn court, teahouse, verandah, loggias and dining room;

3) Staging of garden/Christmas fairs in the garden, lawn court, teahouse, verandah, loggias and in the following three non-principal rooms deemed appropriate for public programs and temporary use (in accordance with Moore & Tropman Conservation Management Plan, 1988)
a) Second bedroom
b) Internal study (following removal and storage of rugs, books and moveable items)
c) Main bedroom (following removal and storage of bed, carpet square and moveable items)

4) Staging of meetings/receptions on verandah, loggias, in dining room and in internal non-principal rooms deemed appropriate for public programs and temporary use (in accordance with Moore & Tropman Conservation Management Plan, 1988) or subsequent conservation management plan endorsed by the Heritage Council;

5) Use of second bedroom as Eryldene Trust’s gift shop; and

6) Use of kitchen and laundry in association with venue hire, open weekends, tours and Trust events.
Feb 22 2013

PDF Standard exemptions for works requiring Heritage Council approval

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Heritage Act - State Heritage Register 0001902 Apr 99 271546
Heritage Act - Permanent Conservation Order - former 0001914 Dec 79 1786348
Local Environmental Plan  15 May 92   
Local Environmental Plan  04 Sep 89   
Register of the National Estate  21 Oct 80   

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
Written(not attributed: photographs by Harold Cazneaux)1923Eryldene, Gordon, NSW: house and garden designed by Wilson, Neave & Berry
Written(unattributed, photographs by Harold Cazneaux)1925Eryldene: a 'Hardy Wilson' house - the home of Mr E G Waterhouse at Gordon, NSW
WrittenArmati, Mary1977E.G.Waterhouse of Eryldene
TourismAttraction Homepage2007Eryldene View detail
WrittenBroadbent, James, in National Trust of Australia (NSW)1980William Hardy Wilson - a 20th century Colonial (exhibition catalogue)
WrittenBrown, Jocelyn1940The Garden at Eryldene, the home of Professor & Mrs E G Waterhouse
WrittenCooper, Nora1936A new era in Architecture? Hardy Wilson talks on the coming change in architectural trends
WrittenEdwards, Zeny2002Bringing Paradise very close to this earth
WrittenEdwards, Zeny2002William Hardy Wilson: Artist, Architect, Orientalist, Visionary
WrittenEdwards, Zeny1995The Grecian Pagoda and the architecture of Eryldene
WrittenEdwards, Zeny1991Eryldene, 17 McIntosh St., Gordon NSW: a documentation of the house, associated buildings, the contents
WrittenEdwards, Zeny; in Goad, Philip (ed.), An Encyclopaedia of Australian Architecture2013'Wilson, William Hardy' and 'Wilson Neave & Berry' entries
WrittenEryldene Trust2004Conservation of Eryldene historic house / NSW Heritage Office heritage incentive program.
WrittenFreeland, J.M.1988Architecture in Australia - a history
WrittenHolden, Penelope2012personal communication (email of 8/4/2012)
TourismMuseums & Galleries NSW2013Eryldene Historic House & Garden View detail
WrittenRead, Stuart2012notes for Australian Garden history Society, Sydney & Northern NSW Branch – Visit notes E.G.Waterhouse National Camellia Garden Visit with Steven Utick - Sunday 29 July
WrittenRobert Moore and Lester Tropman and Associates1988Eryldene: A Plan for Management and Conservation
WrittenThe Erydlene Trust199217 McIntosh Street, Gordon, N.S.W. : Eryldene Gordon, Stage 11
WrittenWaterhouse, E.G.1941The return of the Camellia
WrittenWilson, W. Hardy; Stevens, Bertram; Smith, Sydney Ure1919Domestic Architecture in Australia (extracts from)

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

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Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Heritage Office
Database number: 5045350
File number: 09/01440; S90/03129 & HC 32022


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