State Theatre | NSW Environment & Heritage

Culture and heritage

Heritage

State Theatre

Item details

Name of item: State Theatre
Other name/s: State Building, Wurlitzer Organ
Type of item: Built
Group/Collection: Recreation and Entertainment
Category: Theatre
Location: Lat: -33.8712042028 Long: 151.2073874540
Primary address: 47-51 Market Street, Sydney, NSW 2000
Parish: St James
County: Cumberland
Local govt. area: Sydney
Local Aboriginal Land Council: Metropolitan
Property description
Lot/Volume CodeLot/Volume NumberSection NumberPlan/Folio CodePlan/Folio Number
LOT1 DP115628
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
47-51 Market StreetSydneySydneySt JamesCumberlandPrimary Address
49 Market StreetSydneySydneySt JamesCumberlandAlternate Address
468-472 George StreetSydneySydney  Alternate Address

Owner/s

Organisation NameOwner CategoryDate Ownership Updated
Amalgamated Holdings LtdPrivate03 May 99
Claude Neon Pty LtdPrivate 

Statement of significance:

The State Theatre, Sydney is of national heritage significance at an exceptional level, as a major milestone in the development of the cinema building in Australia, being a departure from the then popular 'atmospheric cinemas' and one of the last of the great flamboyant cinemas erected in the late 1920s, just prior to the Great Depression. It achieved a spatial enclosure of extraordinary fantasy, brilliantly capturing the cinema going spirit of the times. In the State Theatre nothing was real, everything was fantasy, there to stimulate the imagination of the visitor and movie patron.

It's architectural composition is unique in Australia. The architectural and spatial progression from the introductory gothic imagery on the street frontage, through the 14th century Gothic Hall and Robert Adam inspired Empire Room to the Baroque drama of the Rotunda and French Empire decorated foyers into the splendour of the main auditorium is an experience unparalleled in any 19th or 20th century building in New South Wales. The interiors that make up this composition are of the highest of quality design in terms of theatricality and execution, they remain almost completely intact and in excellent condition.

The surviving sections of the gothic detailing are unique, of the highest quality craftsmanship and of exceptional significance. The State Theatre achieved a consistency of execution by the use of the gothic motif not only in the main street level foyers, as the spatial introduction to the Theatre and shopping areas, but across the whole street frontage, over the full extent of the multi storey Market and George Streets facades and throughout the upper interior levels of the Shopping Block. The original gothic imagery of the street level faade and on the soffit of the awning, reflected and set the scene for the lavish interiors. The detailing remains almost intact and in good condition, except where Art Deco decoration was substituted in 1937.

The 1937 Market Street shop front alterations have a high level of cultural significance as a fine and now rare example of Art Deco style of shopfront design, executed at a time when the Shopping Block needed a radical new image to counter flagging consumer support. Unfortunately the alterations of latter decades have adversely impacted on the quality and integrity of this Art Deco decoration. The ultimate failure of the Shopping Block as a retail venue further reduces the significance of the Art Deco decoration.

The Theatre was the premier venue of the former Union Theatre company's Sydney chain, part of the organisation's ambitious national expansion programme in the 1920s, called the 'Million Dollar Theatres' plan. It remains as the flagship of the Greater Union organisation and is associated with the many people who have worked in the organisation and the Theatre over much of the 20th century, but most notably its founder Stuart Doyle.

When erected in 1929 the flamboyantly decorated State Theatre was the ultimate public entertainment venue in New South Wales at a time when movie going audiences were being thrilled by the increasing exuberance of each new cinema. It remained a popular movie venue for tens of thousands of people over many decades and was the scene of many movie premieres being celebrated with major public events. A high level of public interest is sustained by such events as the annual Sydney Film Festival and other special screenings.

Other aspects of the complex are significant for their original functions including a multi storey retail arcade, ballroom and theatrette, although none of these activities survived into the late 20th century. The State Theatrette was a popular place for the public screening of newsreels and special movie presentations, while the State Ballroom remained a popular entertainment venue for many decades. The majority of the original interior decoration of these spaces has long since been removed.

The State Theatre Building is significant as one of only two surviving theatre buildings in Sydney to have been designed by the well known theatre architect Henry E. White. The other is the Capital Theatre.

The interiors of the main public areas contain one of the largest applications of scagliola or reproduction of marble finishes in Australia. The quality of the plaster work, particularly in the Auditorium and Proscenium Arch and of other decorative items such as light fittings, is of the highest standard of 1920s design and craftsmanship. The Chandelier in the main Auditorium is one of the largest in the nation. There is a large collection of original paintings and statuary in the public foyers which arc of considerable artistic quality. The Wurlitzer Organ, while no longer functional, is a rare example of what used to be a major aspect of the movie going experience.
Date significance updated: 30 May 06
Note: There are incomplete details for a number of items listed in NSW. The Heritage Division intends to develop or upgrade statements of significance and other information for these items as resources become available.

Description

Designer/Maker: Henry E. White
Construction years: 1926-1929
Physical description: The architectural and spatial progression from gothic imagery on the street frontage, through the 14th century Gothic Hall and Robert Adam inspired Empire Room to the Baroque drama of the Rotunda and French Empire decorated foyers into the splendour of the main auditorium is an experience unparalleled in any 19th or 20th century building in New South Wales. Conservation works in the 1980s have recaptured and refreshed the incredible nature of this composition.
The adoption of individual historical themes and architectural imagery for each of the spacious 'retiring moms' and lobbies to the public toilets is an unusual and highly attractive device.

The gothic interior design themes and detailing of the Shopping Block, carried from the ground floor lift foyer into the adjacent retail display areas and upper level spaces was of the highest quality and unique as a treatment for a retailing precinct in Sydney. Extensive evidence of this detailing survives in certain areas of the Shopping Block building, particularly the ground floor lift lobby, with its glazed display cabinets.

The 1937 Market Street shop front alterations were, at the time of their installation, a fine example of the Art Deco style of decoration, executed at a time when the Shopping Block was thought to need a radical new image to counter flagging consumer support. Unfortunately the alterations of latter decades have adversely impacted on the quality and integrity of this decoration.

The lavish shopfront decoration, extensive illumination and extravagant event promotion signage all contribute greatly to the richness of the Market Street streetscape in the immediate vicinity.

The interior fitout of the small cafe, most of which dates from the mid 1990s, is a good example of contemporary Art Deco revival but retains important elements, particularly the gothic ceilings and mosaic floor tiling of the original decoration.

The State Theatrette was a popular place for the public screening of newsreels and special film features before the time of television. Many thousands of people were thrilled, entertained, informed or shocked by world and national news items that were first seen at such newsreel screenings.

The State Ballroom was a popular venue for many decades, at a time when Sydney was renowned for its major ballrooms.
The Shopping Block, as first opened, was a popular retail venue until it was overtaken by wider consumer shopping patterns in such places as Department Stores.

The Theatre was the scene of one of the great conservation battles in the early 1970s, at a time when much of historic Sydney was being demolished for commercial redevelopment. Its retention and protection under the NSW Heritage Act reflect the widespread community esteem.
The State Theatre, with its central city location and strong history, is a widely known and popular entertainment facility in Sydney society.
The small cafe has been a popular meeting place for many decades and serves to enliven the streetscape in the immediate vicinity.
Physical condition and/or
Archaeological potential:
Physical Condition is excellent.
Date condition updated:01 Jun 06
Current use: Theatre
Former use: Aboriginal land, commerce, theatre

History

Historical notes: The theatre was designed by the eminent New Zealand theatre architect Henry E. White, the designer of some 120 theatres in Australia and New Zealand. It remains as a rare and pre-eminent example of his firm's work. The design of the State Theatre, was based on original design ideas produced by the American theatre architect John Eberson in co operation with Henry E. White.

The State Theatre opened on the 7th of June 1929. The Theatre was the vision of Stuart Doyle, owner of Union Theatres and the esteemed architect Henry White. It was to be seen as "The Empire's Greatest Theatre" and was designed as a picture palace when such monuments to movies were at their grandest and most spectacular.

During its first week patrons were offered "entertainment of unparalleled magnificence".

The opening night's performance featured noted bandleader Will Prior who was described in the programme as a conductor capable of lifting "jazz to perfection in a sublime miscellany of melodious rhythm".

The first of countless motion pictures to be shown at the State Theatre was "The Patriot" accompanied by Price Dunlavy billed as a "debonair genius" playing the mighty Wurlitzer organ.

Other attractions included Australia's leading soprano Rene Maxwell & the State Beauty Ballet billed as "a beauty bevy with amazing ability".

The stage was now set for countless performers & films to transport and entertain literally millions of future customers.

After providing an outlet and a venue for entertainment during the Great Depression of the 1930s, the next decade saw the spectre of World War return.

Leading up to and during the war, patrons were able to view the latest news via the theatre's regular screenings of the Movietone news-reels.

The State played its part by continuing to provide an escape for all those directly and indirectly involved in the conflict. They thrilled to golden celluloid stars such as Cary Grant , Ronald Colman and Joan Crawford.

Post 1945 , the State once again became the place where Sydneysiders came to play.

This decade saw the dawning of Australia's multicultural society with the first wave of post war immigration. Increasing affluence and economic stability fuelled the rapid expansion of new outer lying suburbs and helped to create the so-called "baby-boom" generation.

As Television was far from an everyday reality, people lived for live & film entertainment and the State was the place to be.

A new generation of Hollywood and local stars had arisen during this decade. Film attractions appearing in this decade included James Stewart in "Bend of the River" and Virginia McKenna staring in an adaptation of Neville Shute classic book "A town like Alice".

The 1960's saw Australia in a period of radical change reflected in the growth of pop culture and increasing opposition to the Vietnam conflict, which mirrored social upheaval around the globe.

In times of change, people often look to entertainment as a release and again the State Theatre provided the outlet.

The changing times are reflected in the films on offer which in 1960 included Yul Bryner in "Once More with Feeling" whilst by 1969 the sexual farce "Can Heironymus Merkin Ever Forget Mercy Humppe and find true Happines" was being shown.

The growing of permissiveness in 1970's Australian society and the rejection of more "traditional" values is seen in the anti censorship demonstrations surrounding the film "Medium Cool".

In 1974, the State Theatre became the home of the prestigious Sydney Film Festival and has continued to play host to this event for two weeks in June, each subsequent year.

In terms of film entertainment, the advent of television during the late 1960's and early 1970's saw film-makers turn towards the Hollywood "blockbuster" as a means of returning lost patrons to the cinema. Such films included blockbusters like The Godfather and Jaws, but a low budget horror movie "Count Yorga Vampire" was also a huge hit to the extent that, as one newspaper reported, police had to be brought in to control the crowds in Market Street.

The 1980s are often described as an unremarkable decade, best remembered for the Rubik Cube and the rise of arcade games.

It was however a time of great change for the State Theatre. After a magnificent restoration of its facilities, the State reopened in 1980 with Bette Midler starring in the concert film "Divine Madness". Two years earlier the "Divine Ms M" had in person, enjoyed a series of triumphant live concerts at the theatre. On the screen, ET- The Extraterrestrial, came to earth in 1982 and made a home at the State.

This decade saw the State Theatre return to its more traditional roots with numerous live acts & musical theatre performances gracing its doors.

Like many cities, Sydney has lost many historic live music venues as the property developers moved in and converted them to new commercial and residential uses. However the State Theatre continued to be amongst the leading venues, this position was reinforced with additional renovations undertaken in the early 1990s.

Performers in this period included Shirley Bassey, Whoopi Goldberg, Rudolph Nureyev, Harry Connick Jnr. Full theatrical runs were undertaken with stage musicals such as Evita, The Secret Garden and Anything Goes. (Historical Notes from State Theatre Website)

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Commerce-Activities relating to buying, selling and exchanging goods and services Developing Commercial Enterprise-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Significant Places How are significant places marked in the landscape by, or for, different groups-Monuments and Sites
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Developing local, regional and national economies-National Theme 3
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages 19th century suburban developments-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages 20th century Suburban Developments-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Subdivision of urban estates-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Cultural Social and religious life-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Creating landmark structures and places in urban settings-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Developing cultural institutions and ways of life-National Theme 8
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Creating works of art-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Architectural styles and periods - Art Deco/Jazz Age-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Architectural style - cinema-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Adaptation of overseas design for local use-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Architectural styles and periods - Interwar Romanesque-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Architectural styles and periods - Interwar Spanish Mission-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Interior design styles and periods - Modernist-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Architectural styles and periods - Interwar Modernist-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Applying architectural design to utlilitarian structures-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Interior design styles and periods - Inter War-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Architectural styles and periods - Gothic Revival-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Interior design styles and periods - Gothic Revival-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Designing structures to emphasise their important roles-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Gathering at landmark places to socialise-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Going to the pictures/movies-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Going to the theatre-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Cinema-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Henry Eli White, renowned cinema designer-

Assessment of significance

SHR Criteria a)
[Historical significance]
The State Theatre, as the premier venue of the former Union Theatre company’s Sydney chain, was part of the organisation’s ambitious national expansion programme in the 1920s called the ‘Million Dollar Theatres’ plan.
It was a major milestone in the development of the cinema building in Australia, being a departure from the then popular ‘atmospheric cinemas’ and one of the last of the great flamboyant cinemas erected prior to the Depression.
The subsequent use and development of the building have mirrored the development of the cinema and theatre as a popular entertainment medium throughout the later decades of the 20th century. It remains as the flagship of the Greater Union organisation and is associated with the many people who have worked in the organisation and the Theatre over much of the 20th century, but most notably its founder Stuart Doyle.
The original multi storey shopping arcade configuration reflected contemporary retail planning for the city, as an eventually unsuccessful variation to the multi storey department store configuration.
The basement areas of the building, when utilised as the State Ballroom and State Theatrette, were the venue for particular styles of public entertainment that flourished in the mid 20th century.
SHR Criteria c)
[Aesthetic significance]
It is an architectural composition which was unique in the late l920s, of the highest quality of design and execution, and of national if not international importance for its creation of a spatial enclosure of extraordinary fantasy, brilliantly capturing the cinema going spirit of the times. The architectural interiors that made up this composition reman almost completely intact and in excellent condition.
The Theatre achieved a consistency of execution by the use of the gothic motif not only in the main foyers, as the spatial introduction to the auditorium and shopping areas, but across the street frontage, the full extent of the multi storey Market and George Streets facades and the upper interior levels of the Shopping Block. The gothic detailing on the street frontage remains almost intact and in good condition, except for about one third of the frontage, where Art Deco decoration was substituted in 1937.
The success of the architectural and spatial composition was ensured by the unique combination of primarily Gothic and French Empire historical styles, rich interior detailing and the evocation of a rich palette of materials achieved largely by imitation.
SHR Criteria d)
[Social significance]
When erected in 1929 the flamboyantly decorated State Theatre was the ultimate public entertainment venue in New South Wales at a time when movie going audiences were being thrilled with the increasing exuberance of each new cinema.
It remained a popular movie venue for thousands of members of the public over many decades and was the place where many movie premieres were celebrated with major public events. This level of public interest is sustained by such events as the annual Sydney Film Festival and other special screenings.
SHR Criteria e)
[Research potential]
The interiors of the main public areas contain one of the largest applications of scagliola or reproduction of marble finishes in Australia. The quality of the plaster wo particularly in the Auditorium and Proscenium Arch and of other items such as light fittings, is of the highest standard of 1920s design and craftsmanship.
The Chandelier in the main Auditorium is one of the largest in the nation.
There is a large collection of original paintings and statuary in the public foyers which axe of considerable artistic quality.
The Wurlitzer Organ, while no longer functional, is a rare example of what used to be a major part of the cinema and theatre going entertainment experience.
There is a large collection of photographs of the State Theatre and Shopping Block taken soon after the building was finished. These remain as a unique collection of historical documents of the extraordinary original interiors, including the furniture and decoration.
Subsequent photographs and other movie memorabilia, held by Greater Union, are a fine record of popular entertainment throughout the 20th century.
The emergency diesel generator in the depths of the building is said to have been salvaged from a German submarine.
SHR Criteria f)
[Rarity]
The cultural significance of the State Theatre is enhanced by a number of unique or rare characteristics:
The entire State Theatre complex is unique in Australia, as a major early 20th century entertainment venue with Gothic and French Empire inspired interiors of the highest quality design and craftsmanship.
The gothic detailing on the Market Street shopfrontage is unique in Australia as an example of early 20th century decoration which functioned as an introduction to the dramatic theatrical imagery of the cinema within.
The gothic decoration of the ground floor lift foyer to the former Shopping Block is unique for such as space in New South Wales and possibly Australia.
The 1920s gothic detailing and composition of the main building facades to Market and George Streets is rare in Sydney for a commercial or public building. Only Scots Church and the former Grace Building can match it for such detailing and overall architectural composition. This language is also comparatively rare on the national and international scene.
The Alt Deco panelling on Market Street is rare as a shopfront in Sydney, there being only the Zink and Sons shopfront in Oxford Street and the former Sydney Electricity shopfronts from the Queen Victoria Building (now in the Powerhouse Museum) for comparison.
SHR Criteria g)
[Representativeness]
The State Theatre site has a long history of development related to activities representative of the central business district of Sydney, including several buildings occupied by the Evening News.
The building is representative of the adoption of contemporary cinema designs from the United States in the 1920s in order to capture a local audience for the emerging international popularity of the movies.
The building is now both rare and representative of the great movie houses built in the major cities around Australia during the years before the Great Depression.
The vertical Shopping Block was representative of that particular style of inner city retailing, introduced in the 1920s but not successful in the face of competition from the large department stores.
Assessment criteria: Items are assessed against the PDF State Heritage Register (SHR) Criteria to determine the level of significance. Refer to the Listings below for the level of statutory protection.

Recommended management:

Recommendations

Management CategoryDescriptionDate Updated
Recommended ManagementProduce a Conservation Management Plan (CMP) 
Recommended ManagementPrepare a maintenance schedule or guidelines 
Recommended ManagementCarry out interpretation, promotion and/or education 

Procedures /Exemptions

Section of actDescriptionTitleCommentsAction date
57(2)Exemption to allow workHeritage Act - Site Specific Exemptions Order Under Section 57(2) to exempt the following activities from Section 57(1):

(1) The alteration of the building including the interior of the ground floor coffee shop and tobacco / sweet shop, other than the theatre, foyer entrance and Market Street faade.

(2)any change of use of the interior of the building including the ground floor coffee shop and tobacco / sweetshop, other than the theatre, foyer or entrance:

(3) change of use of the State Theatre to permit amongst other things, live shows, conferences, functions and such other activities as may reasonably be accommodated;

(4) development of the air space above the State Theatre;

(5) the maintenance of the State Theatre in respect of the following matters:

(a) maintenance of roof: painting, plumbing and general servicing;
(b) maintenance of chandelier hoisting equipment (13 of);
(c)maintenance of air conditioning auxiliary gear-cooling tower, boiler / generator exhaust state air supply inlets;
(d) maintenance of lighting and fire control equipment in roof void;
(e) maintenance of light and power requirement of Front of House, Auditorium and Backstage areas;
(f) maintenance of fire control equipment of Front of House, Auditorium and Backstage areas;
(g) maintenance of Engine Room Equipment, main switchboard (electrical) Diesel Generator (Stand by) Cooling Tower (for diesel):
(h) maintenance of exit ways, lighting and general maintenance;
(I) maintenance of backstage areas including the removal or replacement of screen, speakers, drapes, side drops, back drops and associated equipment;
(j) maintenance of seats: all levels: upholstery of seats, arm rests, stands;
(k) Maintenance of carpets: all levels;
(l) maintenance or repair of all paintings, statues, statuettes, frescoes and artefacts including antique furniture fixtures; and
(m) maintenance of all doorways.
Mar 6 1987
57(2)Exemption to allow workHeritage Act - Site Specific Exemptions Order Under Section 57(2) to exempt the following activities from Section 57(1):

The erection of advertising signs and banners associated with the usage of the State Theatre where such signs/banners do not harm the fabric of interior and are of a temporary nature.
Aug 18 1989
57(2)Exemption to allow workStandard Exemptions SCHEDULE OF STANDARD EXEMPTIONS
HERITAGE ACT 1977
Notice of Order Under Section 57 (2) of the Heritage Act 1977

I, the Minister for Planning, pursuant to subsection 57(2) of the Heritage Act 1977, on the recommendation of the Heritage Council of New South Wales, do by this Order:

1. revoke the Schedule of Exemptions to subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act made under subsection 57(2) and published in the Government Gazette on 22 February 2008; and

2. grant standard exemptions from subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977, described in the Schedule attached.

FRANK SARTOR
Minister for Planning
Sydney, 11 July 2008

To view the schedule click on the Standard Exemptions for Works Requiring Heritage Council Approval link below.
Sep 5 2008

PDF Standard exemptions for works requiring Heritage Council approval

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Heritage Act - State Heritage Register 0044602 Apr 99 271546
Heritage Act - Permanent Conservation Order - former 0044606 Mar 87 441233
Local Environmental PlanCSH LEP 4 07 Apr 00   
Register of the National Estate  21 Mar 78   

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
TourismAttraction Homepage2007State Theatre View detail
WrittenBryant, Jonathan2015'The Futurist Room - State Theatre' View detail
WrittenState Theatre State Theatre Website View detail
TourismTourism NSW2007State Theatre View detail

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

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Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Heritage Office
Database number: 5045499
File number: S90/02071; HC 32155; 76/770


Every effort has been made to ensure that information contained in the State Heritage Inventory is correct. If you find any errors or omissions please send your comments to the Database Manager.

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