Experiment Farm Cottage | NSW Environment & Heritage

Culture and heritage

Heritage

Experiment Farm Cottage

Item details

Name of item: Experiment Farm Cottage
Type of item: Complex / Group
Group/Collection: Farming and Grazing
Category: Homestead Complex
Location: Lat: -33.8197280468 Long: 151.0126189980
Primary address: 9 Ruse Street, Harris Park, NSW 2150
Parish: St John
County: Cumberland
Local govt. area: Parramatta
Local Aboriginal Land Council: Deerubbin
Property description
Lot/Volume CodeLot/Volume NumberSection NumberPlan/Folio CodePlan/Folio Number
LOT14 DP10853
LOT15 DP10853
LOT16 DP10853
LOT27 DP10853
LOT28 DP10853
LOT29 DP10853
LOT37 DP10853
LOT38 DP10853
LOT39 DP10853
LOT1 DP115243
LOT1 DP136100
LOTA DP188738
LOT1 DP256428
VOL7441 FOL3
LOTX DP401280
LOTY DP401280
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
9 Ruse StreetHarris ParkParramattaSt JohnCumberlandPrimary Address

Owner/s

Organisation NameOwner CategoryDate Ownership Updated
National Trust of Australia (NSW)Community Group 

Statement of significance:

Experiment Farm Cottage and the site of Experiment Farm is of exceptional cultural significance to Australia, NSW and Parramatta because:
- it forms part of the first European land grant in Australia;
- it is associated with the early agricultural pursuits, including Governor Phillip's "experiment" to determine the period required in which a settler could become self-supporting. The initial success of Experiment Farm encouraged Phillip to open the Parramatta area to free settlement;
- the location demonstrates the importance of the Parramatta area in the agricultural development and early survival of the European colony;
- Following its purchase by Surgeon John Harris, it became part of "Harris' Farm", one of several large properties established by the "Parramatta Gentry" from the late 18th- mid 19th century, including those owned by the Macarthurs, Marsdens, Kings, Wentworths and Blaxlands. The current Experiment Farm Cottage formed part of "Harris' Farm";
- It contains evidence of the various phases of the site from the late 18th century to the present, including:
- the topographical features associated with Ruse's Experiment Farm;
- the establishment of Harris' Farm and the construction of Experiment Farm Cottage;
- patterns of subdivision and the emergence of the present suburban setting;
- Experiment Farm Cottage is a finely detailed colonial bungalow dating to c.1834. Its sophisticated design is demonstrated through the architectural treatment of the front faade, including French doors, delicate columns and main entrance, and the internal treatment of room configuration and its methods of integrating the verandah into the main area of the house;
- of its visual prominence in the surrounding landscape. The position of Experiment Farm Cottage demonstrates important relationships with the landscape. Situated on a once prominent rise, the current house addresses the north towards Parramatta River and Clay Cliff Creek;
- of its surviving fabric (both extant and archaeological), and the vast body of records documenting its historical development. In particular, resources from the 19th century provide information on the development and layout of Harris' Farm, including Experiment Farm Cottage and associated farm features such as former fence lines, carriage drive, farm roads, plantings, stables, outbuildings and pattern of subdivision;
- of its documented association with individuals who have helped shape its form and use, including Governor Phillip, James Ruse, Surgeon John Harris and his descendents, Pieter Laurentz Campbell and the Fraser family;
- it is a place highly valued by the community. Efforts by the community since the 1920s have assisted in its conservation, culminating in the acquisition of the property by the NSW National Trust in 1961. Local residents have expressed great interest in the ongoing conservation of the property and recognise its heritage significance as contributing towards the identity of Harris Park.

(Britton & Morris, 2001)


Experiment Farm cottage has a strong association with the earliest free settlement of land in Australia and with the first grant to a freed convict, James Ruse. It also has a strong association with John Harris. The house is a rare example of an early farmhouse in very intact condition. Site possesses archaeological potential to contribute to an understanding of early development in Parramatta.
Date significance updated: 27 Apr 98
Note: There are incomplete details for a number of items listed in NSW. The Heritage Division intends to develop or upgrade statements of significance and other information for these items as resources become available.

Description

Physical description: Old Colonial Georgian house with symmetrical front and low pitched hipped roof continuous over verandah of vertically seamed iron. Entrance consists of a 6 panelled door flanked by sidelights and with an elliptical fanlight above.

Cottage sits in small domestic garden with some mature trees, including jacaranda, (Jacaranda mimosaefolia), lemon scented gum (Corymbia citriodora), fruit trees and cottage plants. Since 2001 a more appropriate 19th century pleasure garden to the north has been reconstructed, based on early photographs and records, and comprising 2 large oval beds with mixed tree and shrub planting, a series of "framing" trees including a hoop pine (Araucaria cunninghamiana) and others.

Ruse Street's eastern end is closed off from the west and now accessed by a new diversion local street, on the alignment of a known former farm track, immediately to the east of Experiment Farm Cottage. This road is finished as though it were a gravel farm track, and farm-style post and rail fencing abuts it, and Alice Street to the south.

The remaining setting of Experiment Farm Cottage is of an early 1900s residential subdivision, of mostly single-storey California bungalow cottages, with some later infill of blocks of flats, dating from the 1960s, and some 1980s & 1990s single houses, some two storey. This is the last subdivision of the Harris Farm estate, and its boundary represents (roughly) the 30 acres of land originally granted to James Ruse in 1788. It is listed as a conservation area on SREP 28 - Parramatta.
Date condition updated:08 Sep 03
Modifications and dates: 1788-1793 James Ruse farms first land grant in Australia, experimental farm of 30 acres.
1793 Surgeon John Harris buys, incorporates into "Harris Farm", cultivates, and clears land.
mid-1790s - cottage built

C.1834 Cottage constructed, in front of earlier cottage of 1809.

1850s railway extended to Parramatta to west of estate, start of subdivisions.

1920s subdivision of Harris estate in stages to form modern suburb of Harris Park, Ruse Street formed north of EFC, Alice Street to south. Cottage's address to north blocked by cottages on northern side of Ruse Street.
1950s Parramatta City Council acquire Hambledon Cottage to east of reserve/site and convert to house museum (Parramatta & District Historical Society run it).

1961 National Trust (NSW) acquire Cottage block for house museum after establishment of the Womens' Committee including women such as Dame Helen Blaxland and Rachel Roxburgh, which raised the necessary funds of 4,500 pounds. This was the first property the National Trust (NSW) acquired, and the Trust has since restored and furnished the cottage with colonial pieces and opened it to the public.

1967 the National Trust reconstituted the Lindesay Garden Group as the National Trust Garden Committee, with Diana Pockley as chair. This Committee's work was broader, including work on replanting the grounds of Experiment Farm cottage, Parramatta, Old Government House, Parramatta and Riversdale, Goulburn. (Simpson, C., 2003)

1970-80s Federal Government acquire a number of house lots adjoining EFC and demolished to improve the setting of EFC, ownership of lots transferred to Parramatta City Council as James Ruse Reserve. Acquisition/conversion links Hambledon & EFC. Federal and State Government funds have been made available to also purchase adjoining blocks of land/ houses and demolish these, helping to create a more credible rural landscape setting for what was John Harris' simple farm cottage complex. A Parramatta Properties Committee was established to advise and guide works, dating (at least) from 1968, and chaired from 1971-2 by Dame Helen Blaxland. This committee was disbanded in 1984.

2001/2 Centennary of Federation funds from the Federal Government allowed implementation of a reinstated simple farm garden based on evidence of early - mid 19th century garden plantings around the cottage, including appropriate farm fencing, reinstated plantings such as giant Danubian reed (Arundo donax) on the north-east corner of the cottage, and a bunya pine (Araucaria bidwillii) to its north. During the 1970s & 1980s a number of residential allotments adjoining Experiment Farm Cottage were resumed by the Federal Government with the aim of improving the setting of the Cottage. The houses on these allotments were demolished and the ownership of the newly created open space area was transferred to Parramatta City Council, to become part of the James Ruse Reserve. The boundary of the reserve was extended up to Experiment Farm Cottage. Through the creation of the reserves around the cottage, continuous park area now extends from Hambledon Cottage and Hassall Street (in the north-east and north) south to Experiment Farm Cottage and Alice Street in the south.

2000-01 NSW National Trust undertook a landscape reconstruction of some of the immediate 19th century pleasure garden and carriage drive north of Experiment Farm Cottage. These works focussed on the lands around Ruse Street and south toward Alice Street. Ruse Street's eastern end was closed off and access redirected immediately to the east of Experiment Farm Cottage, along the alignment of a known former farm track. The new road was built to resemble a farm track, in finish, and fencing of a rural nature was installed on both sides of the new road. A carriage drive on the alignment of the original 19th century carriage drive replaced the former Ruse Street in front (north) of Experiment Farm Cottage. The remainder of the street surface and furniture (power poles, kerbs etc) were removed/undergrounded) and a pleasure garden based on early photographs and records was reconstructed. No. 14 Ruse Street was acquired by the Trust and demolished (1920s California bungalow), and its grounds incorporated into the reconstructed landscape of Experiment Farm Cottage, widening its views north and the public views south up the hill from Hassall Street/James Ruse Reserve.

2000-1 Parramatta City Council installed a new pedestrian footbridge over Clay Cliff Creek north of Experiment Farm Cottage to provide easy access as part of the Harris Park Heritage Walk, a series of works to install a pedestrian path, landscaping and interpretive signage along a series of heritage items including Hambledon Cottage and Experiment Farm Cottage. (Heritage Office, 2003).

The 2013 restorations helped stabilise emerging problems including underpinning the north-east corner, internal plastering and painting, new electrical circuitry and power upgrade and re-rendering the cellar. A new fire alarm system and upgraded security alarm system including video surveillance have been installed. The house's presentation front and back have been improved with front and back verandahs lifted, levelled and re-grouted, the exterior painted, the rear garden landscaped, several important collection items repaired and restored. The caretaker's cottage has also been fully refurbished and refitted for the first time since 1962, the volunteer office and kitchen given a new fitout (Hoffman, 2013).
Further information: CPS, NTL, RNE, PRS
Current use: House Museum
Former use: Residence and farm

History

Historical notes: The site was the first (colonial, private) land grant made in Australia, given by by Governor Phillip to James Ruse as a reward for proving an experiment that a settler could be self-sufficient after one year. Ruse had established his farm there.

Ruse had grown up farming in Cornwall, was convicted of burglary in 1782 and transported on the First Fleet to Sydney. His farming experience made him the ideal candidate for Phillip's experiment, and his land grant of 30 acres was a just reward for his hard work.

Ruse sold the land to Surgeon John Harris in 1794. Harris already owned the adjacent property. At the time Harris had many varied roles in the colony, including Magistrate, Deputy Judge Advocate, Superintendent of Police and Naval Officer. He went on to become one of the wealthiest pastoralists in the colony, owning extensive properties in New South Wales (Hoffman, 2013, 10).

Harris, born in County Londonderry, Ireland, spent at least ten years in the Navy as a surgeon's mate, and sailed in New South Wales in his own 21 foot wherry. He was a soldier when serving as an officer in the New South Wales Corps. In the roles of judge advocate and magistrate he functioned as a lawyer. As a public servant in the early 1800s and again in the mid-1820s he was head policeman: as a naval port officer he was a tax man and a government spy. As a builder occasionally contracted by government he constructed the road to South Head in 1803 and public buildings including a toll house in Parramatta in 1829. Displaying the skills of an architect and design engineer he oversaw construction of the 59 ton government schooner, 'Integrity', the Sydney Court House and his own substantial dwellings at Parramatta, Ultimo and South Creek. He was a farmer and a grazier; an explorer who participated in several expeditions including that of Colonel Paterson to the Hunter in 1803 and Surveyor John Oxley's 1818 expedition to the interior; a mercantile agent; and a banker, being one of the founding directors of the Bank of New South Wales - the colony's first bank. A busy many, he played many of these roles while serving as a surgeon to the New South Wales Corps. While never a pauper, when he served as a surgeon's third mate in the Royal Navy in India during the 1770s and 1780s he was not affluent. Yet, by the early 1800s he was a rich man. In 1804 he constructed the first two storeyed verandahed house in the colony (Ultimo House) and had imported deer from India as hunt quarry. In 1814 he gave architect Francis Greenway his first private commission (Rosen, 2007, 13).

The cottage is in the form of the Indian Bungalow, a verandahed form Harris saw in Bengal, India from his arrival in 1782, that was used to house English officers on service there. The cottage's form originated in Bengal, which was the first region the British moved from coastal forts to occupy the interior. Such Anglo-Indian dwellings were primarily used as residence or a place for both living and working, with an office incorporated into the plan. Their builders used traditional Indian strategies to respond to climatic conditions, maximising ventilation and shade and protection from heavy rain while meeting European expectations of form and comfort. It emerged as a 'culturally distinctive house form', the typical 'up-country' dwelling for British officials. This form had its attractions for Harris in New South Wales when he not only attended outpatients but occasionally accommodated the very ill at his home. The hot summers and cool winters of Sydney had more in common with Bengal than Moneymore. The tightly closed houses of Ireland, designated to minimise draughts, were not appropriate in India or New South Wales. The bungalow as adopted by the British was characterised by a pitched thatched roof, a verandah and a raised base platform. It was a free-standing single storey structure. The verandah was sometimes adapted by the British to encircle the house with parts semi-enclosed for privacy and shade. WIth the possible exception of the thatching, these essential qualities are also characteristics of Experiment Farm Cottage, constructed in the mid-1790s at Parramatta by Harris (Rosen, 2007, 18-19). Dr Wilson's bungalow house at Moidapur bears striking similarities with Harris' Experiment Farm Cottage. Both have a verandah integrated into the roof, both are built on a platform, both have shutters, and both have part of the verandah partially enclosed. Both men were in Bengal in the early 1780s (ibid, 21).

Harris lived there till his death in 1836. The property stayed in the Harris family until 1921, when the land was subdivided and the suburb of Harris Park was created (Hoffman, 2013, 10).

The site was acquired by the National Trust of Australia (NSW) in 1961, after the establishment of the Womens' Committee including women such as Dame Helen Blaxland and Rachel Roxburgh, which raised the necessary funds of 4,500 pounds. This committee was established to raise funds, source furnishings and promote Trust membership (Le Seuer, 2015, 6). Experiment Farm Cottage was the first property the National Trust (NSW) acquired and the Trust restored and furnished the cottage with colonial pieces and opened it to the public. Ms Roxburgh wrote the first guide books for the property for the Trust.

In 1960 Cherry Jackaman joined Dame Helen Blaxland on the Womens' Committee of the National Trust (NSW). Jackaman chaired this committee from 1964-67 and by 1968 had raised more than $100,000, which was directed to repairs work at Experiment Farm Cottage, Lindesay and the St. Matthews Anglican Church at Windsor Appeal (McGuiness, 23-24/9/11).

In 1963 the cottage was opened by the National Trust (NSW) as Australia's first house museum with a focus on Australian colonial furniture (Hoffman, 2013, 10).

In 1967 the National Trust reconstituted the Lindesay Garden Group as the National Trust Garden Committee, with Diana Pockley as chair. This Committee's work was broader, including work on replanting the grounds of Experiment Farm cottage, Parramatta, Old Government House, Parramatta and Riversdale, Goulburn.

A Parramatta Properties Committee was established to advise and guide works, dating (at least) from 1968, and chaired from 1971-2 by Dame Helen Blaxland. This committee was disbanded in 1984.

Since acquisition, Federal and State Government funds have been made available to also purchase adjoining blocks of land/ houses and demolish these, helping to create a more credible landscape setting for what was John Harris' simple farm cottage complex. Centenary of Federation funds from the Federal Government allowed implementation of a reinstated simple farm garden based on evidence of early - mid 19th century garden plantings around the cottage, including appropriate farm fencing, reinstated plantings such as giant Danubian reed (Arundo donax) on the north-east corner of the cottage, and a bunya pine (Araucaria bidwillii) to its north.

These same funds allowed the closure of Ruse Street to the west of the cottage, reinstatement of a narrowed carriage drive in front (north) of the cottage, and a new reduced width public road access east of the cottage connecting to Ruse Street (east), based on the location and form of a known earlier farm track. (Heritage Office, 2003).

In recent years there has been some debate as to whether the cottage was built c1794 during the early years of Dr. Harris' ownership, or some time between 1820 and 1835 during the later years of Harris' ownership.

In preparation for the 50th anniversary of the opening of the cottage as a house museum by the Trust, the cottage has undergone a much-needed restoration program of works, funded by the Dame Helen Blaxland Foundation and NSW State Heritage Grants (Hoffman, 2013, 10). It was reopened to the public in July 2013, with a celebration of the 50th anniversary of its first public opening, with NSW Governor and National Trust Patron Marie Bashir re-enacting the 1963 event. Visitation increased from 3581 in 2012/13 to 4557 in 2013/14. The caretaker's cottage was refurbished in 2014 making it suitable for rental accommodation, and work on the rear garden was carried out under the supervision of Colleen Morris, enhancing its appeal for events (Silink & Hayes, 2014).

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
2. Peopling-Peopling the continent Convict-Activities relating to incarceration, transport, reform, accommodation and working during the convict period in NSW (1788-1850) - does not include activities associated with the conviction of persons in NSW that are unrelated to the imperial 'convict system': use the theme of Law & Order for such activities Working on private assignment-
2. Peopling-Peopling the continent Convict-Activities relating to incarceration, transport, reform, accommodation and working during the convict period in NSW (1788-1850) - does not include activities associated with the conviction of persons in NSW that are unrelated to the imperial 'convict system': use the theme of Law & Order for such activities Farming by emancipated convicts on land grants-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Experimenting with new crops and methods-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Experimenting with new breeds of stock-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Farming by convict emancipists-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Places important in developing conservation processes-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Changing land uses - from rural to suburban-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Granting Crown lands for private farming-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Naming places (toponymy)-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Governor Arthur Phillip, 1788-1792,-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with the National Trust of Australia (NSW)-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with James Ruse, first emancipist farmer-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Dr John Harris, surgeon-

Assessment of significance

SHR Criteria a)
[Historical significance]
Experiment Farm cottage was built and occupied by John Harris (1754-1838), surgeon of the colony and pioneer farmer.
It was the site of the first successful agriculture in Australia, commenced by the first owner of the property James Ruse (1760-1837) and continued and developed by Harris and, on the adjacent property, John and Elizabeth Macarthur.
It demonstrates the lifestyle of the early propertied colonial gentry, those in positions of power and influence in post-1788 Australian society.
SHR Criteria c)
[Aesthetic significance]
Experiment Farm cottage is an archetypal Australian colonial house and helped pioneer the use of the verandah which became a major identifying feature of Australian architecture.
The cottage is an elegant example of colonial Georgian rural architecture and demonstrates with substantial intactness the layout and functions of such buildings.
SHR Criteria d)
[Social significance]
Experiment Farm cottage is widely held in high regard (both locally and nationally) as a strong link with Australia's early colonial past, this regard being demonstrated also in past attempts to recover some of the original setting of the house.
SHR Criteria e)
[Research potential]
The cottage and its site have the potential to yield worthwhile historical and archaeological information.
SHR Criteria f)
[Rarity]
Experiment Farm cottage demonstrates with rare quality early colonial processes, customs and activities. The cottage is likely to be one of the oldest extant structures in Australia.
SHR Criteria g)
[Representativeness]
Experiment Farm cottage is an oustanding characteristic example of an early colonial farmhouse built and occupied by the propertied gentry.
Integrity/Intactness: Fully professionally conserved.
Assessment criteria: Items are assessed against the PDF State Heritage Register (SHR) Criteria to determine the level of significance. Refer to the Listings below for the level of statutory protection.

Recommended management:

Recommendations

Management CategoryDescriptionDate Updated
Recommended ManagementReview a Conservation Management Plan (CMP) 
Recommended ManagementPrepare a maintenance schedule or guidelines 
Recommended ManagementCarry out interpretation, promotion and/or education 

Procedures /Exemptions

Section of actDescriptionTitleCommentsAction date
21(1)(b)Conservation Plan submitted for endorsementExperiment Farm Cottage, Conservation Management Plan (National Trust of Australia (NSW, June 2001) CMP received by Heritage Council June 2001.  
57(2)Exemption to allow workHeritage Act

Order Under Section 57(2) to exempt the following activities from Section 57(1):
(i) The maintenance of any item (except Experiment Farm Cottage) where maintenance means the continuous protective care of existing material;
(ii) The minor repair of any item (except Experiment Farm Cottage) where minor repair means the repair of materials by patching, piercing-in, splicing and consolidating existing materials and including minor replacement of minor components such as individual bricks, cut-stone, timber sections, tiles and slates where these have been damaged beyond reasonable repair or are missing. The replacement should be of the same material, colour, texture, form and design as the original it replaces and the number of components replaced should be substantially less than the existing;
(iii) park and garden maintenance including cultivation, pruning, weed control and the repair and maintenance of existing fences, gates and garden walls, tree surgery, but not extensive lopping;
(iv) any works to the Experiment Farm Cottage which are in accordance with the recommendations of a Conservation Plan approved by the Heritage Council of New South Wales;
(v) road repair and maintenance works, subject to approval of an excavation permit by the Heritage Council of New South Wales, including repair and maintenance of roadways, footpaths, kerbing and guttering and associated drainage works and utility installations but not including new construction;
(vi) the engaging in or carrying out of any of the activities referred to in subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act, 1977, by any public authority in respect of the repair, maintenance and construction of service infrastructure, subject to the approval of an excavation permit by the Heritage Council of New South Wales where ground disturbance is involved.
Dec 22 1995
57(2)Exemption to allow workStandard Exemptions SCHEDULE OF STANDARD EXEMPTIONS
HERITAGE ACT 1977
Notice of Order Under Section 57 (2) of the Heritage Act 1977

I, the Minister for Planning, pursuant to subsection 57(2) of the Heritage Act 1977, on the recommendation of the Heritage Council of New South Wales, do by this Order:

1. revoke the Schedule of Exemptions to subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act made under subsection 57(2) and published in the Government Gazette on 22 February 2008; and

2. grant standard exemptions from subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977, described in the Schedule attached.

FRANK SARTOR
Minister for Planning
Sydney, 11 July 2008

To view the schedule click on the Standard Exemptions for Works Requiring Heritage Council Approval link below.
Sep 5 2008

PDF Standard exemptions for works requiring Heritage Council approval

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Heritage Act - State Heritage Register 0076802 Apr 99 271546
Heritage Act - Permanent Conservation Order - former 0076822 Dec 95 1568762
Regional Environmental Plan  05 Jun 90   
Local Environmental Plan 198922 Mar 96 0351243
Local Environmental Plan  21 Jul 89 0844636
Local Environmental Plan  27 Feb 97 20 
Cumberland County Council list of Historic Buildings 1961-67     
National Trust of Australia register      
Register of the National Estate  21 Mar 78   

Study details

TitleYearNumberAuthorInspected byGuidelines used
City of Parramatta Heritage Study1993482Meredith Walker  Yes
Colonial Landscapes of the Cumberland Plain and Camden, NSW2000 Morris, C., & Britton, G./NSW National Trust (for the Heritage Council of NSW)  Yes

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
WrittenA Prescott1995Branch Manager's report to the Heritage Council
WrittenAustralian Council of National Trusts (ACNT)1988'Our Rural Beginnings', in The Historic Houses of Australia
WrittenBrian McDonald & Associates2003Heritage Report on Elizabeth Farm Curtilage: Harris Park Precinct, Parramatta
WrittenBritton, Geoffrey & Morris, Colleen2001Experiment Farm Cottage Conservation Management Plan (draft)
WrittenDavid Sheedy1986Conservation Plan
TourismHeritage NSW2013Experiment Farm Cottage
WrittenHoffman, David2013'A new lease of life for Experiment Farm Cottage'
WrittenLe Seuer, Angela2015'National Trust celebrates its 70th anniversary'
WrittenMcGuiness, Mark2011Love & Duty shaped long life - Cherry Jackaman, 1910-2011 (obituary)
TourismNational Trust of Australia (NSW)2007Experiment Farm - National Trust Visitor Information View detail
WrittenRosen, Sue2007Australia's Oldest House - Surgeon John Harris & Experiment Farm Cottage
WrittenSilink, Richard & Hayes, Gerry2014'Experiment Farm Cottage, Harris Park'
WrittenSimpson, Caroline2003Some Women of the National Trust, in "National Trust Reflections"
TourismTourism NSW2007Experiment Farm Cottage View detail

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

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Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Heritage Office
Database number: 5051403
File number: S92/01326, 10/07097


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