Heritage

Parramatta Park and Old Government House

Item details

Name of item: Parramatta Park and Old Government House
Other name/s: Government Farm, Old Government House and the Government Domain - Parramatta
Type of item: Landscape
Group/Collection: Parks, Gardens and Trees
Category: Urban Park
Location: Lat: -33.8090998594 Long: 150.9967517580
Primary address: O'Connell Street, Parramatta, NSW 2150
Parish: St John
County: Cumberland
Local govt. area: Parramatta
Property description
Lot/Volume CodeLot/Volume NumberSection NumberPlan/Folio CodePlan/Folio Number
CROWN LAND    
LOT7054 DP1074335
LOT7055 DP1074336
LOT369 DP752058

Boundary:

Refer to Heritage Council map.
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
O'Connell StreetParramattaParramattaSt JohnCumberlandPrimary Address

Owner/s

Organisation NameOwner CategoryDate Ownership Updated
Parramatta Park TrustState Government19 Oct 05

Statement of significance:

Parramatta Park demonstrates continuous cultivation and land-use from the management of the Cumberland Plain grasslands by the Burramatta clan of the Dharug Aboriginal people and later through the processes of colonisation, from exploration to occupation, including land clearing and building. The first farm to produce sufficient food to feed the penal colony was established here beside the river in 1788, saving the settlement from starvation.

Following Governor Phillip's establishment of the Governor's Domain in 1790 the area contained agricultural land, stockyards, lumber yards, and most significantly, the governor's residence and vice-regal offices. Old Government House at Parramatta demonstrates the growth of the Colony, from an impermanent cottage, built with the limited material available, into a grand residence with some of the finest extant plaster and joinery from the Georgian period.

A landmark site, the Park and House retains historical association with successive governors, and was the location for significant interaction between Aboriginal and European people. It demonstrates early town planning and landscaping design and features strategic and picturesque views and vistas, created to frame Old Government House and enforce the status of the Governor over the convicts and free settlers inhabiting the township below. As such it is a conscious recreation of English landscapes of control.

The Domain was used for botanical and astronomical scientific research, and the Park is considered both a European and Aboriginal archaeological resource of national significance.

The park has evolved from being one of the earliest successful agricultural sites of the colony, including the site of the only 18th century vice-regal residence and seat of colonial government remaining intact today, to one of the most important and earliest open spaces dedicated for public use. The Park has continuously operated as a public park since 1857, reinforced by its gazettal as a National Park in 1917. Old Government House was used by Governors until 1855, tenanted by the King's School and other organisations, and then operated by the National Trust since 1970 as a house museum. Parramatta Park retains strong associations with the local Aboriginal community.

The whole site is a unique and rare demonstration of the evolution of New South Wales and Australian Society since 1788.
Date significance updated: 16 Feb 07
Note: There are incomplete details for a number of items listed in NSW. The Heritage Branch intends to develop or upgrade statements of significance and other information for these items as resources become available.

Description

Designer/Maker: John Watts, Francis Greenway, W.L. Vernon (Old Government House)
Construction years: 1790-1857
Physical description: An area of 200 acres situated in part of the former Government Domain, containing over 80 items of cultural significance.

These items include: buildings (eg Old Government House), relics (former observatory), historic plantings, archaeological sites (41 in all, including former roads, convict huts, stables, redoubt, lumberyard), vistas (across Parramatta and along George St to the former wharf) and natural items such as bushland. For a description of individual items please refer to the reports listed in the "information sources" field. Archaeological Site: AZP Cross Reference: PP1-41.

Buildings:
Old Government House: (See separate listing)

George Street Gatehouse:
The first gatehouse in this location was a stone lodge built by Governor Macquarie in 1820. Macquarie extended the then Government /Governor's Domain out (east) two blocks to O'Connell Street (formerly it had come up to Pitt Street/Row, far closer to Old Government House. He added a stone gate lodge.

In 1885 a two storey brick Tudor Revival pattern book gate house replaced the first gate lodge which was demolished. Architect Gordon McKinnon designed the new gate house, local builders Hart & Lavor were paid 590 pounds to build it, with local blacksmith T.Forsyth crafting its wrought iron gates (WIlloughby, 2013). The lodge is identical to another built on a pastoral property in the Western District of Victoria (Stuart Read, pers.comm., 8/11/2013). Historically the gatehouse keeper's wife provided picnickers in the park with hot water for tea.

Matilda and Samuel Case are believed to be the first residents of the 'Tudor' Gatehouse, in 1885. In 1901 Gertrude and Lewis Taylor lived there with son Keith, born in the upstairs bedroom the following year. Also in 1902 William Entwhistle moved from the Mays Hill gatehouse to the George Street gatehouse. In the late 1930s Florence and Percy Wyles kept a small zoo, cared for the horses and ran a small shop in the lobby of the gatehouse. Until 1951 Joseph Rose's family lived there while the United States Army occupied Parramatta Park (Willoughby, 2013, citing Chris Rapp, '"The History of a Gate House: the story of a Parramatta Park Entrance").

Mays Hill Gatehouse:
This single storey cottage faces the Great Western Road, now the Great Western Highway (Stuart Read, pers.comm., 8/11/2013).

Westmead Gatehouse:

Observatory Site:
Governor Thomas Brisbane's Observatory site includes two transit stones, two marker trees (Himalayan or chir pine, Pinus roxburghii) to its south, two more chir pines near the Southern Domain gate house spaced the same distance apart as the two close to the observatory, centred exactly on the same north-south alignment extending through the gap in the transit stones (on the Great Western Highway) which probably mark the location of a marker stone), the Observatory Memorial (1880) obelisk and archaeological remains of the footings of both the 28' square observatory with its northern and southern domed ends and the former astronomer's cottage to its west. (Brian McDonald & Associates, Parramatta Park Historic Buildings & Monuments Study, 1986).

Governors' Bathhouse (now a Gazebo / Pavilion):

Govrernor's Stables (demolished to construct the 1855 railway extension from Parramatta to Penrith.

Dairy Complex and Salter's Cottage:
Physical condition and/or
Archaeological potential:
High archaeological potential.
Date condition updated:30 Sep 97
Modifications and dates: 1788: Government Farm founded at Rose Hill, and wheat, barley, corn and oats were planted in June & July that year. Part of the farm was in the Crescent of Parramatta Park, a former anabranch of the Parramatta River.

1790 Governor Phillip laid out the area of the Domain as part of the Parramatta township. It was located on the western edge of the original township, and contained a Governor's residence, stockyards, lumber yard, and the redoubt. It was also used for grazing and food cultivation, grazing continuing until 1900. Under Phillip a town plan was surveyed that included High Street (now George Street), running between the planned site of Government House and 'The Landing Place', further down the river. High Street was 205'/63m wide and one mile/1.6km long. On each side of this street, the Government erected huts set 60'/18.5m apart and constructed to accommodate 10 persons. These were built of wattle and daub with thatched rooves, and measured 12x24'. Convicts built the new street and huts from July 1790. From the early 1810s these were occupied by emancipated convicts and free settlers. From 1814/5 the huts were in disrepair and many were demolished as part of landscaping by Governor and Mrs Macquarie who pushed back (east) the township to create an expanded Governor's Domain. Huts were still standing outside the Domain in 1822 (now part of the Law Courts/Attorney-General's/Bloodbank/Parramatta District Hospital site).

1800-10 Governor King appears to have set up Australia's first public botanic garden, under Sir Joseph Banks' personal plant collector, George Caley, on the Government Farm. Caley also used Old Government house to mount and treat his plant collection/specimens.
The character of the Domain was changed by the gradual removal of the stockyards, lumber yard etc to other areas of the township and by Governor Macquarie who extended the domain east to O'Connell St and reworked the site according to currently fashionable picturesque principles. River Road dates to the Macquarie period (c1810-20).

1822: Governor Brisbane's observatory built on Coronation Hill
1823: Governor Brisbane's bath house built, completed in 1823, on Coronation Hill. Water pumped ex river, heated, drained to a duck pond near the Macquarie Street gatehouse
1850: Railway surveys undertaken to determine the desired alignment of a rail track west of Parramatta.

1858 Parramatta Park created as a Victorian People's Park for public access after much lengthy lobbying from the 1840s. Numerous adaptations, eg: additional paths, drives, planted avenues of trees, plantations, the George Street entrance - three playgrounds have been located near here (northwest of) since 1858.
1860: railway easement, an avenue of English oaks was planted along the length of River Road in the 1860s
1886: Governor Brisbane's former bath house converted into an open arched rooved pavilion
1904: Boer War Memorial and cannon erected, memorial re-cycling Doric columns off the former Parramatta Court house complex, on the southwest corner of Church & George Streets
1911: Memorial to Parramatta resident William Hart, first Australian to fly a plane on a cross-country flight, from Penrith to Parramatta, touching down in the park on November 4th. The flight took 23 minutes.
1913: loss of 0.9 ha to Parramatta High School
1923 and 1965: loss of 1.8 ha to public roads
1952: loss of 1.1 ha to RSL Club
1958: loss of 0.3 ha to Children's Home
1967: dedication of Old Government House
1981: loss of 8 ha to Parramatta Stadium. Stadium Trust has had control of the stadium and surrounds since 3/1989.
c.1985: Burramatta Visitors' Centre (then kiosk) built , designed by Tonkin Zulaikha
1990s: Visitor's Centre renovated, interpretive display on park heritage installed.
1998 major refurbishment of George Street entry playground area including excavation to 600mm depth and excavation of 30 post holes - an archaeological monitoring program accompanied the works. (finding a largely intact soil profile to a depth of greater than 300mm beneath the playground).
2003: Sealing and edging River Road, and two car park areas north and south of the Burramatta visitors' centre, construction of a bus/set-down bay and minor drainage improvements
2004 approval for demolition of three existing toilet blocks and construction of new amenities around the park.

2010: Lady Fitzroy memorial obelisk: commenced conservation (underpinning) works; commenced comprehensive assessment of Park archaeological collection; completed research for a publication on World Heritage Area values; completed conservation of Pitt Street 1880s dwarf stone/iron palisade fence; finished Parramatta River bank restoration project to restore eroded banks and improve access; footpath and cycleway improvements; resurfacing of Railway Parade, Governor Macquarie Carriageway and Federal Avenue; built 600m shared path on northern riverbank from Old Kings Oval to O'Connell Street; planted Sydney Coastal River-Flat Forest species and Aboriginal food and fibre plants as part of Burramatta Aboriginal Landscape trail; built two concrete cricket wickets (Annual Report 2010/11, 11-12)
Further information: PRS, RNE, NTL, HCL, CPS, Higginbotham and Johnson AZP, Parramatta.
Park Draft Plan of Management 1996.
Parramatta Park, Plan of Management. NSW Dept. of Lands,1987.
Parramatta Park Historic Buildings and Monuments Study, Brian Mc Donald Architect Pty Ltd, 1986. Parramatta Park Historic Landscape Study. Brian McDonald Architect Pty Ltd & Craig Burton, 1987. Parramatta Park Plan Of Management, Crown Lands Office. 1983. Draft Plan of Management Parramatta Park. Planning Workshop Pty Ltd. 1980.
Heritage Ccl. conditionally endorsed a landscape master plan for the Park 3 April 2002
Current use: Park, sporting facilities, historic buildings
Former use: Government domain, Government House, school

History

Historical notes: Aboriginal Parramatta:
Research has demonstrated that the presence of large and cohesive Aboriginal groups in the township of Parramatta represented a conspicuous and enduring aspect of the post-colonial periods of Parramatta's development (Steele, 1999, 8). Parramatta was their traditional hunting and fishing grounds and this aspect of traditional use can be interpreted still in Parramatta Park through features such remnant indigenous plantings, scarred trees and the proximity to the Parramatta River and riverine features such as the anabranch of the Crescent and the "Island", a billabong type feature near the George Street gatehouse.

1788-1800: military outpost, Government Farm & Domain:
Early in November 1788 Governor Phillip established a military outpost at Rose Hill. He entrusted the supervision of convicts sent there to commence farming to James Smith, a free man who came from England in the Lady Penrhyn intending to proceed to India, but who was permitted to remain at Sydney Cove (Gray, A.J., entry on Dodd in ADBonline, accessed 7/8/9).

On 4 November 1788 a party of ten convicts known to have some farming experience was sent to the site (the Crescent) to clear it and prepare for further troops and convicts. After the initial removal of trees and erection of temporary huts, convicts began clearing land radiating out from the new settlement (McClymont, 2004, 6).

Smith was soon found unequal to the task and was replaced in March 1789 by Henry Dodd. Dodd was an experienced farmhand who arrived with Phillip as his personal servant. He was found to be the only free man who could be employed 'in cultivating the lands on the public account'. In February 1788 he supervised clearing and hoeing operations at the head of Farm Cove and soon had a few acres under corn.

'This man', wrote David Collins, 'joined to much agricultural knowledge a perfect idea of the labour to be required from the convicts; and his figure was calculated to make the idle and the worthless shrink if he came near them'. Although the number of convicts at Rose Hill increased steadily during the year, the military guard was reduced in October. Dodd's 'influence' was such that 'military coercion was not so necessary as when the settlement was first established'.

That Dodd was no mean gardener was apparent to all who saw the 'plentiful and luxuriant' produce, including a cabbage weighing twenty-six pounds (11.8 kg), which he sent to Government House in 1789, a few days before Christmas. In February 1790 Phillip reported that 100 convicts were working under the direction of this 'very industrious man' and that the corn produced was 'exceedingly good'. When Watkin Tench visited Rose Hill in November 1790, Dodd informed him that 88 (36 ha) of 200 acres (81 ha) cleared and prepared for cultivation were under wheat, barley, oats and maize. Tench was mildly critical of certain procedures, but readily appreciated the practical problems (ibid, ADBonline, accessed 7/8/9).

Phillip laid out the area of the Domain in 1790 as part of the Parramatta township. It was located on the western edge of the original township, and contained a Governor's residence, stockyards, lumber yard, and the redoubt. It was also used for grazing and food cultivation, grazing continuing until 1900 (Old Government House Conservation Plan, 1996). Phillip planned a house and an experimental garden on the site... following the failure of crops in Farm Cove. Beside the first simple government house. of lath and plaster, it contained a gardener's cottage and the experimental garden (Pollen, 1983).

Phillip transferred Henry Edward Dodd from the almost unproductive farm at Farm Cove to Rose Hill to hasten the clearing and planting. Dodd had been a labourer on Phillip's farm in the New Forest in England and accompanied him as his manservant. Desperate for reliable supervisors, Phillip pressed Dodd into service because of this agricultural experience and ability to control working convict on whose results rested the fate of the little colony. A big man, Dodd was hard but fair, able to coax indolent convicts to work; he was greatly respected by the marine officers. He lived across the river from the Redoubt where his hut, a threshing barn and grain store were accessible by bridge (across from Pitt Row). On his visits to the outpost, Phillip shared Dodd's hut until his own house was built in 1790. Dodd's untimely death in January 1791 from pneumonia, was regretted by all. Dodd's grave marker remains the oldest in the stock yard which later became St. John's cemetery. Dodd's efforts contributed greatly to saving the little colony from starvation McClymont, 2004, 6, 8).

Phillip reported in 2/1790 that 100 convicts were then employed in clearing and cultivating the ground: '77 acres in corn promise a good crop'. Surgeon John Harris wrote that) gardens had been established by July 1789, and a small house had been constructed for Superintendent Dodd, who was supervising the agricultural activities. George Barrington, who later occupied this house, states that Phillip initially used this residence prior to the construction of his official 'government house' which commenced mid1790. Lt. Philip Gidley King 9/4/1790 noted that (Dodd's) farm house was on the opposite (northern) side of the creek (Parramatta River). A painting shows a 1791 view of the Government Farm at Rose Hill including Superintendent Dodd's house (taken from the Redoubt (Rosen, 2002, 40)

On 28 January 1791, Dodd, died. He was believed to have taken ill after being exposed to the night while chasing thieves robbing his garden. The garden was an important agricultural site and with the Domain had a crucial role in the early economy of the colony. In late 1791, Mrs Mary Ann Parker described Government House as: a small convenient building, placed upon a gentle ascent, and surrounded by a couple of acres of garden ground'. The six acre garden surrounding Government House had earlier been partly sown with wheat and maize (Rosen, 2002, 40).

Dodd was buried in the corner of a stock reserve which later became the burial-ground of St John's, Parramatta. His funeral was attended by all the free people and convicts at Rose Hill'... A stone erected to his memory still stands in St John's cemetery, but more significantly Collins's tribute endures. 'He had acquired an ascendancy over the convicts which he preserved without being hated by them; he knew how to proportion their labour to their ability, and, by an attentive and quiet demeanour, had gained the approbation and countenance of the different officers who had been on duty at Rose Hill.' (Gray, A.J., entry on Dodd in ADBonline, accessed 7/8/9).

In December 1791 Watkin Tench reported (of the garden around Government House): 'the semicircular hill, which sweeps from the overseer of the cattle's house to the Governor's house, is planted with maize...looked at a little patch of wheat in the governor's garden...went round the crescent at the bottom of the garden, which certainly in beauty and form and situation is unrivalled in New South Wales. Here are eight thousand vines planted. Besides the vines, are several small fruit trees' adding (31/12/1791) that Sydney 'had long been considered only as a depot for stores; it exhibited nothing but a few old scattered huts, and some sterile gardens; Cultivation of the ground was abandoned, and all our strength transferred to Rose Hill...' (Rosen, 2002, 40).

In April 1792, Phillip wrote to Sir Joseph Banks that he had: ' gathered this year about 300 weight of very fine grapes, the quantity next year will be very considerable. I have oranges but they are not yet ripe'

A detail from a c.1796 plan originally prepared by Govr. Hunter, indicates six structures still evident in the vicinity of Dodd's cottage, where opposite, the unnamed Pitt Row runs in front of Government House to the river (ibid, 41).

Under Phillip a town plan was surveyed that included High Street (now George Street), a prominent boulevard designed to rival Pall Mall and other cities finest streets of the time, running between the planned site of Government House and 'The Landing Place', further down the river. High Street was 205'/63m wide and one mile/1.6km long. On each side of this street, the Government erected huts set 60'/18.5m apart and constructed to accommodate 10 persons. These were built of wattle and daub with thatched rooves, and measured 12x24'. Convicts built the new street and huts from July 1790. From the early 1810s these were occupied by emancipated convicts and free settlers. From 1814/5 the huts were in disrepair and many were demolished as part of landscaping by Governor and Mrs Macquarie who pushed back (east) the township to create an expanded Governor's Domain. Huts were still standing outside the Domain in 1822 (now part of the Law Courts/Attorney-General's/Blood bank/Parramatta District Hospital site).

Governor Phillip's second Government House was built in the park in 1790, to facilitate the opening up and settlement of the Sydney basin. Part of the original house is in evidence in the present building which dates from 1799 (extended in the 1810s by the Macquaries). The house was used by NSW's Governors until 1855, after which it was leased to private tenants including the Kings School. The house was taken over by the National Trust (NSW) which opened it as a house museum in 1970. (Old Government House Conservation Plan, 1996)

1800-1857: Science, Government & Recreation:
Governor King (1800-10) appears to have set up Australia's first public botanic garden, under Sir Joseph Banks' personal plant collector, George Caley, on the Government Farm. Caley also used Old Government house to mount and treat his plant collection/specimens.

The character of the Domain was changed by the gradual removal of the stockyards, lumber yard etc to other areas of the township and by Governor Macquarie who extended the domain east to O'Connell Street and reworked the site according to currently fashionable picturesque principles. Phillips straight lined paths and fences were moved out and changed into flowing curves and a more 'naturalistic' character of grass and private estate or parkland. Elizabeth Macquarie is likely to have played a strong part in this refashioning, as she brought pattern books on laying out of estates with her to NSW and had prior involvement in her family's estates in Scotland. The Park's River Road dates to the Macquarie period (c1810-20).

Little information is available about the service wings of more substantial residences during the early years in the colony...An inventory of government-owned furnitutre was conduted in 1821 by Major H.C.Antill, prior to the departure of Lachlan and Elizabeth Macquarie. This itemises the Service WIng's Butler's Pantry, Housekeeper's room, Servants' Hall, Small Larder, Large Larder, Kitchen and Scullery. It ignoresbuilt-in fittings and provides scant information about common domestic artefacts which must have been provided by the Macquaries themselves )(McDonald, 2004, 29).

In 1817 a pigeon house - or probable 'living larder' - was erected at the property (McDonald, 2004, 30).

The Butler's pantry was located conveniently off the Stair Hall so that the incumbent could attend to the arrival and departures of visitors. A variety of domestic tasks were carried out there each day...The current Butler's Pantry was restored by the Trust during the (Centennary of, i.e. 2001) Federation Fund and is loosely based on an 1829 design by Englishman, John Buonarotti Papworth for a property called 'Little Grove' in Barnet, London (McDonald, 2004, 29).

Governor Brisbane (1822-5) had a distinguished military career including campaigns in the Peninsula Wars under the command of his old friend Arthur Wellesley, Duke of Wellington. Through Wellington, Brisbane first sought the Governorship of NSW in 1815, and, after some persuasion, at the age of 46, he got his commission from Lord Bathurst in March 1821. In 1825 he was recalled along with Colonial Secretary Frederick Goulburn when Lord Bathurst refused to side with either in a long-running feud between the two men.

Brisbane, his wife Anna Maria and two month old Isabella Maria and a household of relatives, friends and professional assistants arrived in November 1821. They were not fond of colonial society and never took up residence in Sydney. The Parramatta Domain suited Thomas' desire to pursue astronomical and natural sciences, while being of benefit to Maria Anna's 'delicate' nature and a sound place to raise a young family. Two more children were born there, Eleanor Australia and Thomas Australius. Their last child, Henry, born on the return voyage, survived only three months. During Brisbane's governorship, Government House Parramatta saw its most active period as a residence, centre of government and of scientific research (Hoffman, 2012, 22).

Brisbane brought with him, at his own cost, a complete private observatory, two assistant astronomers, James Dunlop (1793-1848) and Christian Carl (Charles) Rumker (1788-1862) and a keeper of clocks and instruments, James Robertson (Hawkins, 1977, 101). He was also interested in astronomy and had an observatory (complete by 2 May 1822: Hawkins, 1977, 101) and bathhouse built in 1822 on the hill west of Old Government House. This is significant as the first permanent observatory site in Australia, also for Brisbane's contribution as the man who established astronomy and scientific activities in the colony. Brisbane was a skilled astronomer in his own right, and work here produced some of the most important astronomical observations in the southern hemisphere in the first half of the 19th century. The observatory's transit stones were also used as the meridian mark for Thomas Mitchell's first trigonometrical survey of Australia in 1828. The site has additional significance for its historic associations with astronomers Dunlop and Rumker. Both were recognised in Europe for their achievements (McDonald, 1986, abridged). Sir John Herschel referred to the observatory as the locus of Australia's first great scientific achievement (Hawkins, 1977, 101).

Reports from Brisbane's Observatory won him and his assistants Rumker & Dunlop numerous medals, accolades and professional advancements, while Brisbane was to be elected President of the Royal Society of Edinburgh in 1832. The most important discoveries and reports predicted the return of Enke's Comet in June 1822, defining the shape of the earth, and 'A Catalogue of 7385 Stars, Chiefly in the Southern Hemisphere', printed in 1835. Brisbane's catalogue of stars derived from observations made between 1822 and 1826 at Parramatta. For this work he received the Gold Medal of the Royal Astronomical Society in 1828. Sir John Herschel during its presentation called Brisbane 'the father of Australian Science' (Hawkins, 1977, 103).

Briefed to wind back many of Macquarie's leniencies towards convicts, Brisbane's governorship saw the establishment of secondary penal colonies at Norfolk Island and Moreton Bay where his name lives on as the city of Brisbane. He himself opposed excessive corporal punishment, and was criticised for his granting of reprieves and pardons. Other indelible achievements included The New South Wales Act 1823 establishing the Legislative Council, Courts of Quarter Sessions and trial by jury, the regulation of parish registers, postal services, control of shipping and registration of deed and legal documents. In 1822 he founded an agricultural training college and was first patron of the NSW Agricultural Society, while allowing freedom of the press in what was still a penal colony (Hoffman, 2012, 22-3).

With Brisbane's departure in 1825,, the observatory was run by Rumker, who was appointed by Governor Darling as first Government Astronomer. Rumker left for England in 1829 to induce the Royal Society to print his astronomical observations made at the observatory. These were published in 1829 but, after quarrelling with Brisbane, Rumker returned to Hamburg in Germany, eventually to become the director of its observatory. All the astronomical instruments remained in the colony and survive in the present observatory on Sydney's Observatory Hill, which was completed in 1858 as Sydney's third observatory (after Dawes' Point and Parramatta)(Hawkins, 1977, 103).

The observatory remains as an archaeological site (transit stones), and the bathhouse was adapted in 1887 as a park pavilion/gazebo. Brisbane also granted land on the Government Farm to the first Agricultural Society in Australia in 1822 as an experimental growing ground for fruit trees and other plants. (See Old King's School/Marsden Rehabilitation Centre site)(DPWS, 2002, 15-16).

In January 1836 the HMS Beagle visited Sydney on its circumnavigation of the globe, under Captain Fitzroy, charting longitudes and latitudes by chronometer for the Royal Navy. Old Government House was important to that expedition, as the reason the Beagle visited Sydney was to check its chronometrical determination of longitude against that determined in Governor Brisbane's Observatory just west of Old Government House. Secondly, the Beagle's Captain Fitzroy attended a party at Old Government House on 18/1/1836, in the company of Hannibal Macarthur, his wife Maria and Mrs Anna King (wife of the colony's third Governor, Philip King (Nicholas, 2008, 10).

Cricket in Parramatta started relatively early after formation of the Sydney colony. "The Commercial Journal" newspaper reported that the 'manly' game of Cricket was introduced to Parramatta in 1839 - the maiden match being played on August 17th for pound and supper at mine host of the Royal Exchange Hotel. The Parramatta District Cricket Club has been officially acknowledged by the NSW Cricket Association Library as the 'oldest living' cricket club in Australia (spanning 163 years). The first recorded match against Liverpool at Parramatta on Monday 11th September 1843. Parramatta won by 35 runs. Over the next decade and a half Parramatta participated in many recorded games, for example in 1848 a match was played against the Fitz Roy Club on 'Harris Meadow' at Parramatta and through the 1850s matches regularly played on the 'Barracks Square'.

The shared heritage between Parramatta Cricket Club and Parramatta Park commenced in 1862 when the Club President Dr.George Hogarth Pringle gained approval to build a Cricket Oval within the race track in Parramatta Park. Members toiled hard for 12 months levelling the surface, growing a well grassed pitch and erecting a modest post and rail fence around the field. In March 1863 the first match (Married v. Single) was played. The Parramatta (Cumberland) Cricket Club continued playing on the oval, with significant matches against English International touring teams in 1881, 1884, 1886, 1887 and 1891. Parramatta was a foundation member of the NSW Cricket Association Grade competition in 1893/4 and continues to participate in this competition. The club switched from Cumberland Oval to Old King's Oval in the early 1970s, to accommodate the initial reshaping of the oval into a rectangular layout for Football, which eventually evolved into Parramatta Stadium in 1986 (Parramatta (Central Cumberland) District Cricket and Parramatta Park 'The Shared Heritage', undated (2009).

Under Governor Fitzroy in the 1840s a Racecourse (the Cumberland Turf Club) was laid out north of the river in response to the 1840s Parramatta Parks Movement which pushed for more public access to the Government Domain. It ran from 1847-1858 (it was large, extending from the River in the west to O'Connell Street in the east) and the Mud Lodge Races ran here from 1858-1883. This was the first step towards a public park which would satisfy the recreational and health needs of the people of Parramatta. The opening of the Vice Regal Domain followed the establishment of the Racecourse (DPWS, 2002, 15).

1857+ Public Park:
In 1857 the western section of the Domain was offered for sale, while 200 acres was retained for public use. The Parramatta Domain Act of 1857 provided for a park of no less than 200 acres to be managed by Trustees for public use and granted as a park for 'promoting the health and recreation of the inhabitants of the town of Parramatta'. The area set aside was not surveyed until 1887 and at that time was 246 acres or 99.6 hectares, which is historically regarded as the original land dedication. An avenue of English oaks was planted along the length of River Road in the 1860s. The opening of the Vice Regal Domain followed the establishment of the Racecourse. Government House was fenced separately and divorced from the park. Cricket was played here from 1868 (DPWS, 2002, 15-16).

By 1902 the fenced cricket ground north of the river was removed and replaced by two entrance avenues to Cumberland Oval. One was a plantation of kurrajongs in line with Victoria Road, the other a more informal plantation of eucalypts and kurrajongs leading from the direction of the King's School. Both led to the ticket box. The Cumberland Oval was double-fenced and its encircling trees removed: the King's Oval retained its encircling trees and gained a picket fence (Parramatta Park Historic Landscape Study, 1987). In the 1910s the Racecourse was divided into three smaller ovals defined by (stone pine) tree planting (DPWS, 2002, 16).

A major programme of restoration works was undertaken to Old Government House in 1909 under the supervision of the Government Architect, Walter Liberty Vernon, before conversion to a school. The verandahs on the pavilions were added at this time. An ablutions block was added to the rear of the north pavilion. The King's School (the oldest independent school in Australia) had continuous occupancy of Old Government House for almost sixty years from 1909, until it was placed in the care of the National Trust of Australia (NSW) in 1967 (National Trust, 2009, 7-8).

Parramatta Park was gazetted as a National Park in 1917 and has since performed the role of a regional park. The Park today is 88.6 hectares in size, representing a loss of 13 hectares in 140 years (Parramatta Park Plan of Management, 1996)

Sporting activities began to dominate after the 1930s including motorcycle and car racing in 1938. In 1939 a Rugby League oval was built at Cumberland Oval (the site of the Stadium) and between 1958 and 1966 a memorial swimming centre alongside (DPWS, 2002, 17).

The road ways in Parramatta Park are significant as many represent the remains of the earliest town planning in Parramatta. The road layouts have been designed to reflect the natural topography of the area including the River Road which follows the course of the Parramatta River. Road alignments have remained substantially unchanged since the 1880s (NB: River Road was constructed by the 1860s and appears on an 1887 survey map.

The change of occupancy of Old Government House was brought about by a gesture by the Commercial Bank of Australia Ltd. in granting $50,000 towards restoration work on condition that it was placed in the care of the National Trust of Australia, and with the Government's full endorsement this was agreed to, an Act of Parliament being passed in 1967. A programme of restoration works were undertaken between 1968-70 under the direction of L.J.Buckland, honorary architect in charge of works, aimed at returning the house to the configuration used by Macquarie in 1815 based on the plans of Lt.Watts (National Trust, 2009, 8).

The Visitors' Centre (then kiosk) was built c.1985, designed by Tonkin Zulaikha architects.

During the 1990s the National Trust (NSW) removed a number of the earlier modifications to Old Government House, including many of the outbuildings. Despite the use of the Lt.Watts plans, the house both internally and externally is somewhat different in detail to its appearance in 1816. The Trust's approach has been to present the ground floor largely as it was used by the Macquaries, with the exception of the Governor's Office. Very few of the service areas are presented to the public. Work has been undertaken in the Macquaries' drawing room to present it as it would have appeared based on the early inventories. The garden was also modified to a layout based on 19th century landscaping principles by John Claudius Loudon and a local Sydney nurseryman, Thomas Shepherd. Sometime later it was discovered that the layout that was removed, was in fact an early layout of the carriage loop that had survived intact until the 1850s when it was mapped during surveys for the new railway line. The garden remains in its unaltered configuration. The grounds, which were considered by early visitors to be far superior to the house, currently provide little evidence of the landscaped setting intended and created by the Macquaries (National Trust, 2009, 8).

In 1995 the Rumsey Rose Garden was officially opened, on the site of the former Bowling Greens and before that of the Convict Lumber Yard near Pitt Row (later Pitt Street) and the Macquarie Street gatehouse. The gardens are named in honour of the late Heather and Roy Rumsey, nursery proprietors of Dural who donated two of every species (& cultivar) of 'heritage rose' (Rosa spp. & cv.s) they had stockpiled in their nursery for more than 45 years. The result was more than 500 heritage rose varieties/cultivars and species. In 2008 a new drip irrigation system was added to the garden (Howlett, 2009).

The Parramatta Park Trust Act was passed in 2002, establishing the Parramatta Park Trust as an independent Government Authority (formerly part of NSW National Parks & Wildlife Service's Regional Park network).

Cricket has been played at the Old King's Oval from 1883 to the present day. Cricket was played on the nearby Cumberland (Parramatta) Oval from 1868 until its closure. The sport of cricket has been played within Parramatta Park as an integral part of its history as a public park and contributes to that significance. The current use is a continuation of historic uses here since the public movement for recreation space achieved the release of Government Domain lands for a racecourse in the 1840s and then the creation of Parramatta Park in 1857. (Parramatta District Cricket Club, 2006).

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
2. Peopling-Peopling the continent Aboriginal cultures and interactions with other cultures-Activities associated with maintaining, developing, experiencing and remembering Aboriginal cultural identities and practices, past and present. Daruk Nation - sites evidencing occupation-
2. Peopling-Peopling the continent Aboriginal cultures and interactions with other cultures-Activities associated with maintaining, developing, experiencing and remembering Aboriginal cultural identities and practices, past and present. Eora nation - places of contact with the colonisers-
2. Peopling-Peopling the continent Convict-Activities relating to incarceration, transport, reform, accommodation and working during the convict period in NSW (1788-1850) - does not include activities associated with the conviction of persons in NSW that are unrelated to the imperial 'convict system': use the theme of Law & Order for such activities Working for the Crown-
2. Peopling-Peopling the continent Convict-Activities relating to incarceration, transport, reform, accommodation and working during the convict period in NSW (1788-1850) - does not include activities associated with the conviction of persons in NSW that are unrelated to the imperial 'convict system': use the theme of Law & Order for such activities Administering the convict system-
2. Peopling-Peopling the continent Convict-Activities relating to incarceration, transport, reform, accommodation and working during the convict period in NSW (1788-1850) - does not include activities associated with the conviction of persons in NSW that are unrelated to the imperial 'convict system': use the theme of Law & Order for such activities Demonstrating convicts' experiences and activities-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Farming with convict labour-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Attempting to transplant European farming practices to Australian environments-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Landscapes and parklands of distinctive styles-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Landscapes of urban amenity-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Science-Activities associated with systematic observations, experiments and processes for the explanation of observable phenomena Researching botany and botanical processes-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Science-Activities associated with systematic observations, experiments and processes for the explanation of observable phenomena Researching astronomy-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Housing governors and vice-regal families-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Accommodating convicts-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Developing civic infrastructure and amenity-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Planning relationships between key structures and town plans-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Urban landscapes inspiring creative responses-
7. Governing-Governing Government and Administration-Activities associated with the governance of local areas, regions, the State and the nation, and the administration of public programs - includes both principled and corrupt activities. Developing roles for government - facilitating agriculture-
7. Governing-Governing Government and Administration-Activities associated with the governance of local areas, regions, the State and the nation, and the administration of public programs - includes both principled and corrupt activities. Direct vice-regal governance (pre 1856)-
7. Governing-Governing Government and Administration-Activities associated with the governance of local areas, regions, the State and the nation, and the administration of public programs - includes both principled and corrupt activities. Developing roles for government - parks and open spaces-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Sport-Activities associated with organised recreational and health promotional activities badminton-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Sport-Activities associated with organised recreational and health promotional activities swimming-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Governor Phillip Gidley King 1800-1806-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Governor Lachlan Macquarie, 1810-1821-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Governor Lord Augustus F.S.Loftus, 1879-1884+-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Governor Ralph Darling and Eliza Darling, 1826-1830-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Governor Bourke, 1831-5-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Governor Arthur Phillip, 1788-1792,-

Assessment of significance

SHR Criteria a)
[Historical significance]
Parramatta Park demonstrates the development of people's interaction with the environment. The land was first used by the Burramatta clan of the Dharug Aboriginal people as a fishing and hunting ground. The Burramatta people's connection to the land saw the Park become the site of significant interaction with European people. As such, Parramatta Park contains evidence of the first impact of British settlement and the subsequent development of many phases of the Nation's development. The site is closely associated with the beginnings of rural settlement in Australia and with exploration and the extension of colonisation. Rural settlement at the head of the Parramatta River had early importance to the colony as productive agricultural land, stockyards and lumberyards. The proclamation of Government Domain in 1790 and the construction of Old Government House is strong evidence of this. The former Government Domain and vice-regal residence at Parramatta demonstrate the early importance of the rural settlement at the head of the Parramatta River. Old Government House itself demonstrates the growth of the Colony, from an impermanent cottage, built with the limited material available, into a grand residence, followed by the consolidation of public administration in Sydney.

The current use, as a public park, is a continuation of historic uses here since the public movement for recreation space achieved the release of Government Domain lands for a racecourse in the 1840s and then the creation of Parramatta Park in 1857. The sport of cricket has been played within Parramatta Park as an integral part of its history as a public park and contributes to that significance.

The park is historically significant as a site of Aboriginal and early European heritage, early agriculture and as a seat of government. The park is the remnant of the Government Domain which dates from first settlement and was used for early grazing and food crops as well as for the private use of the Governor. Old Government House was the early focus of Parramatta, an indicator of its importance and was the starting point for several early explorations of the interior.
SHR Criteria b)
[Associative significance]
Parramatta Park is of State significance as a landscape and house created by Governor and Mrs Macquarie. As Old Government House, the site is also primarily associated with Governors Phillip, King, Macquarie, Brisbane, Darling and Fitzroy. The buildings were associated with the King's School, a state significant educational institution. In 1970 the National Trust, a significant heritage organisation to New South Wales, began its long association with the site.

Old Government House is the architectural work of two prominent early colonial architects: Francis Greenway and Lieutenant John Watts. Government architect Walter Liberty Vernon is associated with the refitting of the house for use by the King's School and meticulously recording the building prior to the works.

The site has additional significance for its historic associations, through the Parramatta Observatory, with astronomers James Dunlop and Christian Carl (Charles) Rumker, both of whom were recognised in Europe for their achievements.
SHR Criteria c)
[Aesthetic significance]
The site is aesthetically significant for its cultural landscape values. Old Government House shows the direct translation of English building forms to Australia. It contains original eighteenth century English joinery, no other examples of which occur in Australia to this standard. The work of three significant architects (Watts, Greenway and Vernon) is also demonstrated in the house.

The location of Old Government House was chosen for the expansive views commanded. The garden design augmented the setting to form an aesthetically significant landscape and aspect. The effect created is striking, originally to enforce the status of the Governor over the convicts and free settlers inhabiting the township below - a conscious recreation of an English working manorial estate. The House is one of very few where the original setting can still be seen. Old Government House is an aesthetically significant Palladian-style country house and illustrates the best of the elegant "Old Colonial Georgian" style of architecture.
SHR Criteria d)
[Social significance]
Research has demonstrated that the presence of large and cohesive Aboriginal groups in the township of Parramatta represented a conspicuous and enduring aspect of the post-colonial periods of Parramatta's development. Parramatta was their traditional hunting and fishing grounds and this aspect of traditional use can be interpreted still in Parramatta Park through features such remnant indigenous plantings, scarred trees and the proximity to the Parramatta River and riverine features such as the anabranch of the Crescent and the "Island", a billabong type feature near the George Street gatehouse.

Old Government House is of social significance to the people of New South Wales as an early seat of government and a site integral to the formation of the Colony and as a tourist and school excursion destination.
SHR Criteria e)
[Research potential]
Old Government House and Parramatta Park have exceptional archaeological research potential, and are of state heritage significance. The complex was a seat of the Colonial Governor from 1788 to 1855, when the present Government House, Sydney finally prevailed as the vice-regal residence. Retained in public ownership, the Park is a complex cultural landscape which includes individual archaeological features and deposits of unparalleled research potential. The physical archaeological evidence within this area may include built landforms, structural features, open deposits and scatters, ecological samples and individual artefacts which have potential to yield information relating to major historic themes including Aboriginal Pre-Contact, Aboriginal Post-Contact, Environment, Convicts, Government and Administration, Labour, Industry, Agriculture, Pastoralism, Monuments and Sites, Sport and Science. Archaeological evidence at this site is likely to be largely intact, though subject to major disturbance in some areas.

Governor Thomas Brisbane's 1822 Observatory site is of historic and scientific significance as marking the first permanent observatory site in Australia and also Brisbane's contribution as the man who established astronomy and scientific activities in the colony. Brisbane was a skilled astronomer in his own right and work here produced some of the most important astronomical observations in the southern hemisphere in the first half of the 19th century. The transit stones were also used as the meridian mark for Thomas Mitchell's first trigonometrical survey of Australia in 1828.
SHR Criteria f)
[Rarity]
The former Old Government House is the oldest surviving public building in Australia, has significant historic associations and is a unique example of 18th century English building work in Australia. It is rare as the oldest surviving vice-regal residence in Australia.

The road ways in Parramatta Park are significant as many of them represent the remains of the earliest town planning in Parramatta. The road layouts have been designed to reflect the natural topography of the area including the River Road, which follows the course of the Parramatta River. As the road alignments have remained substantially unchanged since the 1880s, the roads are likely to have beneath them substantial remains of older road surfaces, culverts and retaining walls. These remains are potentially highly significant for their ability to demonstrate early convict road building techniques. The roadways within the Park also have a park-land ambience, which separate them from the busy roads surrounding the Park.
SHR Criteria g)
[Representativeness]
Old Government House and Parramatta Park are representative of the Old Government Houses established around New South Wales in the early years of the Colony, including those on Norfolk Island, Newcastle, Windsor and Sydney. While not all of the same architectural style or with such extensive domains, Parramatta is an example of construction of accommodation for the Governors of New South Wales.
Integrity/Intactness: Generally good but affected by encroachments, particularly Parramatta Stadium.
Assessment criteria: Items are assessed against the PDF State Heritage Register (SHR) Criteria to determine the level of significance. Refer to the Listings below for the level of statutory protection.

Recommended management:

Plan of Management for park; conservation plan for Old Government House Implementation of 2002 Master Plan (Landscape Management Plan) by DPWS. Park archaeologist Catherine Snelgrove's 1998 "Assessment of the Roads in Parramatta Regional Park" recommended a number of conservation policies for park roads, including: - maintaining the current alignment of all roads, their narrow carriage width; - not introducing new landscape to define road edges such as mounding; - no disturbance to existing road surfaces except under the direction of an archaeologist; - reintroduction of avenue planting to define roads using traditional avenue trees taking into account views within the park and to and from the park. - (re River Road/Drive) additional avenue planting to match the existing oak trees - rationalisation of parking to have parking areas located near to key activity nodes - landscaping of existing parking bays to minimise the visual impact of larger car parking areas - consideration of the impacts on soft edges and archaeological sites where not all surfaces are fully bituminised - consideration of opportunities to interpret the significance of roads within the park - interpretation of the roadways of the park - review of the 1998 report with new information (such as Dominic Steele's work) in 5 years (due by June 2003). Manage in accordance with CMP/Plan of Management and particularly in accordance with Landscape Master Plan (DPWS, 2002), giving priority to actions recommended in that document.

Recommendations

Management CategoryDescriptionDate Updated
Recommended ManagementProduce a Conservation Management Plan (CMP) 
Recommended ManagementCarry out an Archaeological Assessment 
Recommended ManagementPrepare a maintenance schedule or guidelines 
Recommended ManagementCarry out interpretation, promotion and/or education 

Procedures /Exemptions

Section of actDescriptionTitleCommentsAction date
57(2)Exemption to allow workHeritage Act - Site Specific Exemptions Order Under Section 57(2) to exempt the following activities from Section 57(1):
(1) Implementation of the current management plan approved under section 37u of the Crown Lands Consolidation Act;
(2) the maintenance of any building, structure, monument or work on the site , where maintenance means the continuous protective care of existing material;
(3) horticultural maintenance, including lawn mowing, cultivation, pruning and remedial tree surgery;
(4) weed control by methods not affecting historic plantings or remnant native vegetation;
(5) control of noxious animals by methods not affecting native fauna;
(6) removal of pruning of trees considered by a qualified tree surgeon to be dead or dangerous;
(7) erection and dismantling of temporary structures , signs, crowd control barriers, banners, stages, lighting and sound and public address equipment associated with special events and functions held in the Park;
(8) suppression of domestic and other fires in cases of active threat by fire to life or property;
(9) maintenance of safety clearances around power lines in accordance with current guidelines published by the Energy Authority of N.S.W;
(10) maintenance and repair of existing roads, paths, fences, gates, drains, water reticulation facilities and other utilities;
(11) maintenance of safety clearances around railway lines.
Jun 9 1989
21(1)(b)Conservation Plan submitted for endorsementParramatta Park CMP Mr Christopher Levins
Director
Parramatta Park Trust
PO Box 232
PARRAMATTA NSW 2124


Dear Sir


Conservation Management Plan for Parramatta Park

Further to your letter of 15 August 2003, and to your telephone conversation with Bruce Baskerville of this Office, I can advise you that the draft conservation management plan for Parramatta Park has received a brief preliminary review, and that the format and general approach are considered acceptable.

I understand that, in view of the extensive body of research and planning that has been undertaken over the years for the park, that this particular format has been developed as suitable for the use of park officers; that Stuart Read of the Heritage Office has participated in the development of this format and approach; and that it has been peer-reviewed by Craig Burton and Stephen Davies.

I also understand that further work may be done on the history component, but that apart from this, the rest of the content of the document is largely ready for review.

I look forward to receiving your final version for review and endorsement,

Yours sincerely

Cameron White
Principal Heritage Officer
Jun 21 2005
57(2)Exemption to allow workStandard Exemptions SCHEDULE OF STANDARD EXEMPTIONS
HERITAGE ACT 1977
Notice of Order Under Section 57 (2) of the Heritage Act 1977

I, the Minister for Planning, pursuant to subsection 57(2) of the Heritage Act 1977, on the recommendation of the Heritage Council of New South Wales, do by this Order:

1. revoke the Schedule of Exemptions to subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act made under subsection 57(2) and published in the Government Gazette on 22 February 2008; and

2. grant standard exemptions from subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977, described in the Schedule attached.

FRANK SARTOR
Minister for Planning
Sydney, 11 July 2008

To view the schedule click on the Standard Exemptions for Works Requiring Heritage Council Approval link below.
Sep 5 2008
21(1)(b)Conservation Plan submitted for commentCMP Dairy Precinct: attended workshop re updating 1998 CMP Jun 25 2009

PDF Standard exemptions for works requiring Heritage Council approval

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Heritage Act - State Heritage Register 0059602 Apr 99 271546
Heritage Act - Permanent Conservation Order - former 0059609 Jun 89 723410
Heritage Act - s.170 NSW State agency heritage register     
Regional Environmental PlanParramatta ParkSched.6 pt.1 (state signif)20 Aug 99   
Archaeological zoning planParramatta Archaeological Management Unit 2877    
Cumberland County Council list of Historic Buildings 1961-67     
National Trust of Australia register  9237, 9238   
Register of the National Estate multiple listings21 Mar 78   
National Heritage ListOld Government House and the Government Domain - P10595701 Aug 07   
World Heritage ListOld Government House and Domain, Parramatta 31 Jul 10   

Study details

TitleYearNumberAuthorInspected byGuidelines used
City of Parramatta Heritage Study1993418Meredith Walker  Yes
Colonial Landscapes of the Cumberland Plain and Camden, NSW2000 Morris, C., & Britton, G./NSW National Trust (for the Heritage Council of NSW)  Yes

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
WrittenA. J. Gray1966'Dodd, Henry Edward ( - 1791)' entry in Australian Dictionary of Biography, Volume 1 View detail
WrittenAnne Bickford1988Parramatta Park - the Observatory Site - excavation of the foundations
WrittenAnne Bickford for Brian McDonald Architect Pty. Ltd. Architect;1987Report : Parramatta Park: the Governor's dairy, excavation of portion of room 4C
WrittenArchaeology & Heritage2009Parramatta Observatory site : exemption application s.57(2) NSW Heritage Act for removal of fill
WrittenAustralian Council of National Trusts (ACNT)1988'A Celebrated Classic', in The Historic Houses of Australia
WrittenBartok, Di2013"Park protection planned - Trust recognises World Heritage value"
WrittenBrenchley, Elizabeth1980Parramatta Observatory, Old Government House, Parramatta - the case for archaeological investigation
WrittenBrian McDonald Architect1986Parramatta Park Historic Buildings & Monuments Study
WrittenBruce Baskerville2009Pers. Comm.
WrittenCatherine Snelgrove1998Assessment of the Roads in Parramatta Regional Park
WrittenClinton Johnston & Verena Mauldon2009Parramatta Observatory, Parramatta Park: the story of Brisbane, Rumker & Dunlop
WrittenComber Consultants; Plim, Caroline2013Brief History of the Agricultural Society of NSW in Parramatta Park
WrittenDepartment of Public Works & Services (DPWS), Landscape Design Group2002Parramatta Park Master Plan (landscape master plan) View detail
WrittenDesign 5 Architects2000Macquarie Street Gatehouse - conservation & refurbishment works: specification and schedules
WrittenDesign 5 Architects (Team coordinator)1994The Dairy Precinct - revised Conservation Management Plan
WrittenDominic Steele1999Archaeological Monitoring Report
WrittenDominic Steele Consulting Archaeology2004Archaeological Excavation Report: Macquarie Street Entrance Precinct Augmentation Proposal
WrittenDominic Steele Consulting Archaeology2002Parramatta Park Macquarie Street Entrance Precinct - Storage Depot, Marquee Site & Car Park proposal: cultural heritage assessment report
WrittenDominic Steele Consulting Archaeology2001Archaeological Monitoring Report - Domain Creek Wetland Construction - Parramatta Golf Course
WrittenDominic Steele Consulting Archaeology1999Archaeological Monitoring Report George Street Playground
WrittenDominic Steele Consulting Archaeology1999Archaeological Monitoring Report - George Street Playground
WrittenDominic Steele Consulting Archaeology; Parramatta Park Trust2007Former Governor Phillip's drive stabilisation and interpretation project. Macquarie Street entrance precinct, Parramatta Park: S60 archaeological excavation report
WrittenDr Val Attenrbow for Australian Museum Business Services1994Parramatta Park - Management & Interpretation of Aboriginal Sites - stage 1
WrittenEco Logical Australia Pty Ltd.2008Parrramatta River Grey-Headed Flying Fox Camp Management Plan (project no.215-001)
TourismFriends of Old Government House2006Friends of Old Government House Tourism Website View detail
WrittenGemmel-Smith, Margot; Capon, Joanna Report on the Garden at Government House, Parramatta
WrittenGingra Ecological Surveys, Roger Lembit for2003Review of Bushland Restoration of The Ridge - a report to Parramatta Park Trust
WrittenGoddon Mackay1995Parramatta Park Archaeological Zoning Plan
WrittenGovernment Architect's Office, Department of Commerce2010Heritage Impact Statement - Parramatta Riverbank Stabilisation Project
WrittenHawkins, John1977' Observatories in Australia', in The Australasian Antique Collector, 1977
WrittenHeritage Group - NSW Department of Public Works & Services1997Old Government House, Parramatta - Conservation Plan
WrittenHoffman, David2012'The Sixth Governor of the Colony: a quieter achiever', in 'Now & Then', in Trust News, 5/2012
WrittenHowlett, Scott2009Promise of Rose Garden', in Parramatta Sun (newspaper) 4/11/2009
WrittenHubert Architects2007Parramatta Swimming Centre: Addendum to Heritage Assessment & Statement of Heritage Impact
WrittenLe Seuer, Angela; Shain, Christopher (photography); National Trust of Australia (NSW)2007'Simple Elegance: Old Government House in 1821'
WrittenLewis, Miles1987Vice-Regal Shacks
WrittenLomb, Nick2004'The Instruments from Parramatta Observatory'
WrittenLucas, Clive2014'Old Government House and its Dormer Windows'
WrittenMcClymont, John2004Chapter: 'Rose Hill: a convict town', in A Pictorial History: Parramatta and District
WrittenMcDonald, Patricia2004'The heart of the house', in Reflections, National Trust Quarterly Magazine, august-october 2004
TourismNational Trust2006Old Government House - National Trust Tourism Website View detail
WrittenNational Trust of Australia (NSW)2009Heritage Impact Statement - Old Government House, Parramatta, 10/12/2009
WrittenNSW Dept. of Commerce; NSW Government Architct's Office - Heritage Group; Parramatta Park Trust2008Mays Hill Gatehouse, Parramatta Park, condition report with options for adaptation (report)
WrittenNSW Government Architect; Correy, Alan; Oates, Neil; Bridges, Peter1969Old Government House, Parramatta Park - proposed landscape development
TourismParramatta City Council2006Parramatta Park - Tourist Walk View detail
WrittenParramatta City Council; Parramatta Park Trust; Sue Clunie1994Old King's Oval: report on all possible improvements to the Old Kings oval landscape precinct
WrittenParramatta District Cricket Club Inc.2006Heritage impact statement: proposed development
TourismParramatta Park Trust2004Parramatta Park Trust Homepage - Tourism Website View detail
WrittenParramatta Park Trust2009Parramatta Park Trust Heritage & Conservation Register (s170 Register) View detail
WrittenParramatta Park Trust2008Parramatta Park Trust Heritage Asset Management Strategy (HAMS) View detail
WrittenParramatta Park Trust2007final Parramatta Park Conservation and Management Plan
WrittenParramatta Park Trust2007Parramatta Park Conservation & Management Plan - Final View detail
WrittenParramatta Park Trust2006Submission for national heritage listing - Old Government House and the Government Domain - Parramatta
WrittenParramatta Park Trust2004Assessment of the Views & Vistas in Parramatta Park
WrittenParramatta Park Trust2003Parramatta Park conservation and management plan 2003-2008
WrittenParramatta Park Trust1996Parramatta Park Plan of Management
WrittenParramatta Park Trust - National Trust of Australia (NSW)2009Old Government House and Domain, Parramatta Park - Management Plan View detail
WrittenParramatta Park Trust (with CAB Consulting, Dominic Steele et al).2009Old Government House & Domain, Parramatta Park Landscape Project
WrittenParramatta Park Trust, David Liddle2012May's Hill Gatehouse, Parramatta Park: archival photographic heritage recording (report)
WrittenParramatta Park Trust; David Liddle2012Parramatta Observatory / Governor Brisbane transit stones observatory, Parramatta Park: archival photographic heritage recording (report)
WrittenPeter Hunt Architect2007Parramatta War Memorial Swimming Centre - Alterations & Additions: Photographic Heritage Survey
WrittenPollen, Frances1983Parramatta: The Cradle City of Australia: its history from 1788
WrittenProudfoot, Helen; NSW State Planning Authority1971Old Government House: the building and its landscape
WrittenRosen, Sue2003Government House, Parramatta, 1788-2000: a history of the governors, their home and its domain, Parramatta Park
WrittenSaunders, Shirley2004'Sir Thomas Brisbane's Legacy to Colonial Science: Colonial Astronomy at the Parramatta Observatory, 1822-48'
WrittenShain, Christoper (photography); National Trust of Australia (NSW)2007Old Government House, Parramatta
WrittenSmith, Cate; Parramatta Park Trust1997Bibliography: Parramatta Regional Park
WrittenSnowy Mountains Engineering Corporation Australia (SMEC)2005Statement of Environmental Effects for 2 Fish Passageways on the Parramatta River
WrittenState Projects Heritage Group1996Conservation Plan: Old Government House Parramatta
WrittenStedinger & Associates2003A heritage study of four weirs along the Parramatta River
WrittenSue Rosen1999The Dairy Precinct in the former Government Domain, Parramatta Park: Evidence for an alternative interpretation
TourismTourism NSW2007Old Government House Parramatta View detail
Writtenvarious (including Bickford, Anne, 1988, Observatory Site - excavation of the foundations)1988Parramatta Park Observatory : a collection of papers (Parramatta Park capital works strategy (excerpt) ; Sir Thomas Brisbane's legacy to colonial science - Colonial astronomy at the Parramatta Observatory, 1822-1848 by Shirley D Saunders ; Instruments fro
WrittenVarman, R., Dr.1997Archaeological Zoning Plan for Parramatta Park
WrittenWendy Thorp1994Archaeological report Governor's Dairy precinct Parramatta Park - a report
WrittenWestmead Alliance2013Westmead Health & Medical Research Precinct - A Plan for the Future View detail
WrittenWilloughby, Sally2013'Historic Gatehouse to open its doors'

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

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(Click on thumbnail for full size image and image details)

Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Heritage Office
Database number: 5051462
File number: 09/1461; S90/01429;S90/01914


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