Gledswood (under consideration for curtilage amendment) | NSW Environment & Heritage

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Heritage

Gledswood (under consideration for curtilage amendment)

Item details

Name of item: Gledswood (under consideration for curtilage amendment)
Other name/s: Buckingham
Type of item: Landscape
Group/Collection: Farming and Grazing
Category: Homestead Complex
Location: Lat: -34.0023918049 Long: 150.7822690720
Primary address: 900 Camden Valley Way, Gledswood Hills, NSW 2557
Parish: Narellan
County: Cumberland
Local govt. area: Camden
Local Aboriginal Land Council: Tharawal
Property description
Lot/Volume CodeLot/Volume NumberSection NumberPlan/Folio CodePlan/Folio Number
LOT1201 DP1187381
LOT1202 DP1187381
LOT1203 DP1187381
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
900 Camden Valley WayGledswood HillsCamdenNarellanCumberlandPrimary Address
900 Camden Valley WayCatherine FieldCamdenNarellanCumberlandAlternate Address

Owner/s

Organisation NameOwner CategoryDate Ownership Updated
Caldla Pty LtdPrivate03 Jun 16
Sekisui House Australia Pty LtdGeneral03 Jun 16
Sekisui House Australia Pty LtdPrivate 

Statement of significance:

Gledswood is an early 19th century farm estate that has close associations with the Camden area which is the birthplace of the Australian wool industry. Built by James Chisholm in c.1830, Gledswood remained the Chisholm family residence for 90 years. A prominent feature at Gledswood is an outstanding colonial garden that was expanded in 1870. The garden featured in Horticultural Magazine (1870) and was romanticised by Hardy Wilson in 1920. The intense and continual interest in gardening at Gledswood has made Gledswood a prominent contributor to the art of gardening within NSW.

Gledswood has historical significance for its association with the early development of Australia's wine industry. James Chisholm junior planted a vineyard in 1830, and in 1847 vinedressers from Germany were imported to work it. A convict built cellar under the homestead was capable of holding 20,000 bottles of wine (Everett, 2004).
Date significance updated: 29 Jul 03
Note: There are incomplete details for a number of items listed in NSW. The Heritage Division intends to develop or upgrade statements of significance and other information for these items as resources become available.

Description

Designer/Maker: Unknown
Builder/Maker: James Chisholm
Construction years: 1827-1855
Physical description: Farm:
Gledswood is set on 65 hectares (150 acres) of pastoral land. The Gledswood estate is located off Camden Valley Way south of Raby Road, Catherine Field, across from Raby (SHR item no. 1694). Its rear (the south) of Gledswood abuts the Upper Canal water supply for Sydney (SHR item no. 1373). Gledswood is the first of such early farming properties visible when travelling from Sydney along Camden Valley Way (the former Hume Highway and former Cow Pasture Road).

The estate was developed by James Chisholm c.1830 on land granted to him in 1829. Located in the centre of the property is a selection of Georgian farm buildings. The homestead was built by James Chisholm c.1830 on land granted in 1829 and later renovated, probably in the 1870s, to include the Gothic verandas and porches; the kitchen has been separated forming a courtyard. The house has a long stone flagged front veranda on the north side with two gables breaking the eavesline and marking the entrances. Decorative features include bargeboards in a rustic pattern, shuttered french doors and a front door with fanlight and side lights. The walls are rendered brick.

The current access drive winds through open cleared paddocks and remnant advanced and regrowth woodland. Old woodland remnants such as a group of broad leaved apple trees (Angophora subvelutina) frame entry views to the homestead and the distant araucarias. Old trees in paddocks are in decline and remnants of original woodland are a prominent feature of its landscape.

A group of mature Araucarias/ hoop pines (Araucaria cunninghamii) distant from the road identify the location of the homestead long before any buildings are in view and are definitive of the 19th century landscape character, occurring in association with other typical plant species found throughout the district.

Outbuildings:
The kitchen has been separated from the house and forms the courtyard. The outbuildings within the estate include: large cellars; an administration wing; a fine two storey stable building now used as a restaurant'; machinery shed; and other farm buildings such as the decorative wooden hen house.

Garden:
Gledswood contains an outstanding "wilderness" garden, a large formal garden area and many typical 19th century ornamental plantings. Together these combine to create an interesting and intimate series of spaces with views over the surrounding rural landscape. Gledswood's signature plantings of tall Bunya pines remain a landmark from roads and sites in the area.

A highly maintained lawn and formal garden in front and adjacent to the house along with pockets of bushland dominated by vines and shrubs now considered weeds, are common thematic elements of 19th century landscapes. Close to the homestead is a variety of wild hedgerow and the front of the administration building, south of the wilderness is dominated by a grove of pepper trees (Schinus molle var.areira), two of which may possibly date from the mid to late 19th century. This species is also scattered throughout the livestock yard and is around the outbuildings and have the same evocative character as the plantings of Belgenny Farm Homestead at Camden South. Further plantings in this area include an old stunted Moreton Bay Fig (Ficus macrophylla). To the south of the building is a black locust /false acacia tree (Robinia pseudoacacia).

The northern front to the homestead is in the shape of an expansive ellipse, bounded by a formal gravel driveway with a remnant planting of a lone large white cedar (Melia azedarach var.australasica) on the edge of the driveway.

The eastern garden, set out in the gardenesque style, continues this more formal thematic planting. The trees and shrubs in this area are an eclectic mix of species is typical of late 19th century and early 20th century botanical collections. A rose garden has been established east of the homestead and adjacent to this older formal garden. The eastern lawn contains further planting of jacaranda (Jacaranda mimosifolia) and other associated species. The old stunted macadamia nut tree (Macadamia integrifolia) is located south-east of the homestead and is a rare specimen planting in this district.

Sources:
"Early Colonial Homes of the Sydney Region 1788 - 1838".
"Camden Significant Tree and Vegetated Landscape Study", Volume 3 of 3
Morris, C. & Britton, G., "Colonial Landscapes of the Cumberland Plain and Camden NSW", Volume 2, 2000.
Physical condition and/or
Archaeological potential:
Gledswood has been left largely unaltered in design. It has archaeological potential to reviewal evidence of early European farming practices and an understanding of early gardening practices.
Date condition updated:29 Jul 03
Modifications and dates: 1810 400 acre grant to de Kerilleau (former 'Buckingham').
1815 500 acres to north added (acquired by and granted to James Chisholm).
1816, extension of Kerilleau grant land to the east and south (acquired by and granted to James Chisholm).
1818 extension of land to the south again (former 'Horatio Park') (acquired by and granted to James Chisholm).

1861 two acres set up for erection of a school building (closed 1888)
c1870s Major modifications /renovations to Gledswood homestead with the addition of Gothic verandas and porches and the expansion of existing gardens under James Kinghorne Chisholm.
1881-8 land resumed for construction of The Upper Canal across the estate. Bridges built across the canal to allow access.
1907 land exchange with George Molle of Molles Marnes to south, of land south of The Upper Canal. Molle's former land north of the canal (and facing Camden Valley Way) became part of Gledswood.

1959 subdivision of Gledswood into three lots (east, east-of east, and west of the canal)
1968-71 Horderns running cattle on estate, much repairs to buildings.

1971 Testoni brothers ('Camden Vineyards') bought Gledswood, hoping to revive the vineyards, begin promoting the estate as a tourist attraction.
1972 38 acres between Raby Road and the Upper Canal divided from the estate,
1973 subdivision roughly divided Gledswood estate in half - over 100ha to the north and east of the house transferred to the NSW Planning & Environment Commission. Another 10 ha transferred to Camden Council in 1976. In 1978 land on which Gledswood is situated took its present form when over 400ha were subdivided for the El Caballo Blanco enterprise under the ownership of Andalusia Entertainment Centres P/L (for horse shows, tourist attraction).
1970s subdivision of eastern section (1972, 3, 6, 8) of sections facing Camden Valley Way in eastern part (non-1959 lots)
Other modifications have been the adaptive re-use of buildings such as the two storey stables now used as a restaurant.
Further information: HO held discussions with a number of interested parties in 2001 concerning this site. Some of these involved retirement village style development proposals. The property was placed on the market in 2003 and sold around March 2003. Any development proposals would require a heritage impact statement which focuses on how the heritage significance of Gledswood can be retained and conserved while allowing appropriate changes.
Current use: Tourist complex and private residence, golf course housing estate (parts)
Former use: Aboriginal land, colonial farm and vineyard, rural estate

History

Historical notes: Gabriel Louis Marie Huon de Kerilleau left France and fled to England during the French Revolution. He joined the New South Wales Corps and arrived in Sydney 'in the reduced circumstances of a private soldier' under the name Gabriel Louis in the 'Surprise'in October 1794 (Carroll, 1983, 31).

He was discharged in 1807 and, because of his knowledge of (fluency in) French, became tutor to John Macarthur's sons (ibid, 31).

Governor Macquarie granted him the 400 acres (162ha) which became 'Buckingham; as from 1 January 1810, and he called it Buckingham after the Marquis of Buckingham, who had some part in arranging his discharge (ibid, 31).

Huon de Kerilleau employed convicts to quarry stone on the property and start his building programme. Their first project was the small cottage where they were chained each night. Then they went on to the coach house and the servants' quarters (ibid, 31).

In 1816 Huon de Kerilleau sold the property to James Chisholm for 250 pounds and moved to a new property at Bungonia, near the future site of Goulburn. His son, Paul Huon, became a pioneer in the Wodonga district (ibid, 31).

James Chisholm renamed the property 'Gledswood', and it was he who, in about 1827, finished the main homestead. Chisholm had been involved in the rum trade in the early days of the colony. He was friendly with John Macarthur, who farmed nearby at Camden Park. They shared an interest in the wine industry, which flourished in the district (ibid, 32).

Chisholm's son James planted a vineyard in 1830. Vinedressers Frederick and Anna Worner of Wittenberg (Germany) were imported to work the vineyard in 1847. Chisholm once wrote 'There is much about the vine that renders it an attractive pursuit.' The convict built cellar under the main homestead was capable of holding 20,000 bottles (Everett, 2004).

Upon receiving a land grant on Cowpastures rural downs in 1829, James and Elizabeth Chisholm built Gledswood in 1830. A large stuccoed rubble stone house was built in the style of an Indian bungalow with an attached kitchen wing and a nearby barn. The property remained in the Chisholm family for the next 90 years.

James Chisholm's son, James II (Jas), planted its vineyard c.1830. The Macarthurs of Camden Park were friends of the Chisholms and loaned their six German vine dressers to the Chisholms on occasions until the Chisholms imported two other vine dressers of their own in 1847. Frederick and Anna Worner worked the vineyard with their six children. Jas Chisholm and his new wife Elizabeth quickly had Gledswood performing well. Besides the vineyard, they ran a fine herd of cattle and developed many breeds of sheep. Chisholm's wool brought the highest prices on the market. The estate had its own butcher shop, a great orchard and house cows which produced milk and cream. Gledswood comprised 1000 acres by 1850. Jas once wrote 'there is much about the vine that renders it an attractive pursuit'. The convict cellar built under the 90 square meter main house was capable of holding 20,000 bottles. James planted the estate's famous garden and his son James II developed them further (Everett, 2003, 4-6).

Gledswood was extensively renovated during the c.1870s and was noted for its outstanding garden which was expanded by Charles Kinghorne Chisholm and described in the Horticultural Magazine (1870) in the same year that Maryland was featured. The garden remained a prominent feature of Gledswood and was romanticised by Hardy Wilson c.1920. Much like Camden Park Estate, Gledswood has close association with the historical Camden district and for its involvement in pioneering Australia's wool industry.

When the Testoni brothers bought the property in 1971 from Anthony Hordern, a condition of sale was that they would re-establish its winery. This has proven very successful and Gledswood does not produce serious quantities in the new millenium (ibid, 2003, 4). The family established 60 hectares of grapes, mainly classical varieties (Traminer, Trebbiano, Semillon, Barbera, Mataro, Pinot Noir, Chardonnay and Cabernet Savignon). They also established a small herd of cattle for making cheese (Carroll, 1983, 32).

In 1972 an area of 38 acres was subdivided from Gledswood. In 1973 the estate was subdivided roughly in half. In 1976 an area of 10 hectares was transferred to Camden Council. In 1978 an area of 400 hectares was subdivided from Gledswood for the El Caballo Blanco equestrian enterprise (GML, 2017, 5).

Gledswood has been developed by the Testoni family as a tourist farm with a reduced farm curtilage. The site is owned by Caldla Pty Ltd. Gledswood is currently open to the public as a colonial working farm with additional activities such as wine tasting, wedding functions and a country restaurant. The house is currently unoccupied but is used for functions.

Through the 1980s various changes occurred at Gledswood and new structures were constructed (GML, 2017, 5).

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
2. Peopling-Peopling the continent Convict-Activities relating to incarceration, transport, reform, accommodation and working during the convict period in NSW (1788-1850) - does not include activities associated with the conviction of persons in NSW that are unrelated to the imperial 'convict system': use the theme of Law & Order for such activities Working on private assignment-
2. Peopling-Peopling the continent Convict-Activities relating to incarceration, transport, reform, accommodation and working during the convict period in NSW (1788-1850) - does not include activities associated with the conviction of persons in NSW that are unrelated to the imperial 'convict system': use the theme of Law & Order for such activities Creating a gentleman's estate-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Wine making-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Pastoralism - grazing sheep, cattle, goats or other animals-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Attempting to transplant European farming practices to Australian environments-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Growing vines and maintaining vineyards-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Clearing land for farming-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Orcharding-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Landscapes and gardens of domestic accommodation-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Landscapes and countryside of rural charm-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Landscapes of cultural and natural interaction-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Landscapes of food production-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Gardens demonstrating the travels and sojurns of a gardener-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Gardens and landscapes reminiscent of an 'old country'-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Significant tree(s) providing rural amenity or character-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Housing famous families-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Gentlemens Mansions-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Housing for farm and station hands-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Housing farming families-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Changing land uses - from rural to suburban-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Resuming private lands for public purposes-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Granting Crown lands for private farming-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Sub-division of large estates-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Changing land uses - from rural to tourist-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Expressing lines of early grant allotments-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Selecting land for pastoral or agricultural purposes-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Creating landmark structures and places in regional settings-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Country Estate-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Rural orchards-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Role of transport in settlement-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Planning manorial villages and systems-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Vernacular hamlets and settlements-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Utilities-Activities associated with the provision of services, especially on a communal basis Providing drinking water-
5. Working-Working Labour-Activities associated with work practises and organised and unorganised labour Working on pastoral stations-
5. Working-Working Labour-Activities associated with work practises and organised and unorganised labour Working independently on the land-
6. Educating-Educating Education-Activities associated with teaching and learning by children and adults, formally and informally. Private (independent) schooling-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Designing landscapes in an exemplary style-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Architectural styles and periods - colonial homestead-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Vernacular structures and building techniques-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Building in response to climate - verandahs-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Landscaping - 20th century interwar-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Landscaping - Victorian gardenesque style-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Building in response to natural landscape features.-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Landscaping - Federation period-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Interior design styles and periods - Edwardian-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Interior design styles and periods - Colonial-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Architectural styles and periods - Victorian (mid)-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Architectural styles and periods - Victorian (mid)-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Interior design styles and periods - Victorian-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Living in a rural homestead-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Kitchens and servants-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Gathering at landmark places to socialise-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Gardening-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Developing collections of items-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Visiting heritage places-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Social institutions-Activities and organisational arrangements for the provision of social activities Places of informal community gatherings-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with James Chisholm Jnr., MLA, MLC, grazier, viticulturist, politician-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with James Kinghorne Chisholm, magistrate, government adviser, educator, farmer, gardener-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Anthony Hordern, retailer, merchant, gentleman farmer-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Gabriel Huon de Kerilleau, emigree, private soldier NSW Corps, tutor and farmer-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with James Chisholm, soldier NSW Corps, trader and farmer-

Assessment of significance

SHR Criteria a)
[Historical significance]
The Gledswood Estate was built by James Chisholm c.1830 on land granted to him in 1829 and was upgraded in 1870 to include planned renovations to the buildings and extensions to the gardens that followed within the style of colonial style design.
SHR Criteria b)
[Associative significance]
Gledswood's outstanding 19th century garden was mentioned in the Hoticultural Magazine c.1870 and by William Hardy Wilson c.1920 Gledswood remained in the Chisholm family for 90 years and has a strong association with the Camden district.
SHR Criteria c)
[Aesthetic significance]
Romanticised by William Hardy Wilson, Gledswood contains one of the best of the Cowpasturers gardens.
SHR Criteria d)
[Social significance]
Gledswood estate has a strong association with the Camden district, much like Camden Park, . Gledswood's unique character is recognised by well maintained colonial gardens and buildings that offer a strong historic rural character.
SHR Criteria e)
[Research potential]
Gledswood has high potential to yield information on colonial settlement within Cowpastures rural downs, and in a wider sense, Camden and Cumberland County. This information combined with other studies within the area will greatly contribute to a better understanding of our cultural history.
SHR Criteria f)
[Rarity]
Gledswood is a rare example of an early Australian homestead characterised by mid 19th century gardens and ornamental plantings.
SHR Criteria g)
[Representativeness]
Gledswood is representative of early colonial settlement patterns in the Cowpastures rural downs area. Gledswood's colonial gardens is presentative of traditional European influenced landscapes and of 19th and early 20th century interest in botanical collections.
Integrity/Intactness: Gledswood has been left largely unaltered in design although adaptive re-use of the buildings and new plant material has been introduced.
Assessment criteria: Items are assessed against the PDF State Heritage Register (SHR) Criteria to determine the level of significance. Refer to the Listings below for the level of statutory protection.

Recommended management:

Review of draft 7/2010 Conservation Management Plan (CMP) for the entire estate. Input into VPA for adjoining lands (former estate) now owned by others.

Procedures /Exemptions

Section of actDescriptionTitleCommentsAction date
57(2)Exemption to allow workStandard Exemptions SCHEDULE OF STANDARD EXEMPTIONS
HERITAGE ACT 1977
Notice of Order Under Section 57 (2) of the Heritage Act 1977

I, the Minister for Planning, pursuant to subsection 57(2) of the Heritage Act 1977, on the recommendation of the Heritage Council of New South Wales, do by this Order:

1. revoke the Schedule of Exemptions to subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act made under subsection 57(2) and published in the Government Gazette on 22 February 2008; and

2. grant standard exemptions from subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977, described in the Schedule attached.

FRANK SARTOR
Minister for Planning
Sydney, 11 July 2008

To view the schedule click on the Standard Exemptions for Works Requiring Heritage Council Approval link below.
Sep 5 2008
21(1)(b)Conservation Plan submitted for commentCMP for estate (in conjunction with rezoning and a heritage agreement) Contact: Stuart Read
Telephone: 9873 8554
stuart.read@planning.nsw.gov.au
B no.: not registered
HOD no.: 5051540
File: 10/15444



Ms Alison McCabe
Director
SJB Planning P/L
Level 2, 490 Crown Street
SURRY HILLS NSW 2010


Dear Alison,

Draft Conservation Management Plan for Gledswood
900 Camden Valley Way, Catherine Field, Camden

The Heritage Council Approvals Committee considered a report on the draft plan at its meeting of 2 February 2011 in order to provide you with their comment.

The Heritage Council Approvals Committee considered the extent of the proposed area for new housing close to the entrance driveway and west of the riparian zone likely to be of some impact on the setting and views to and from the homestead complex. Members considered that further work is required to reduce the proposed area of housing to taper away to as it approaches the entrance driveway in its north - i.e. to reduce its 'rectangular' extent into more of a triangle, and one that does not extend further north than about half of its current extent.

After deliberation, members determined:

That the Heritage Council:
a)Request the applicant to further consider the significance of the area of proposed housing to the west of the site in terms of the potential impacts on views to and from the site and the setting of Gledswood House;
b)Advise the applicant that in principle and on the information currently available, the area of proposed housing to the south of Gledswood House may be developable;
c)Give conditional endorsement of the CMP subject to more work being required to parts of it, namely:
1)supplementing figure 5.3 at a finer scale, further work identifying and mapping views and vistas within and particularly from the SHR curtilage outward, (e.g. as listed in section 7.4.6, subsection 3 page 120) and any relevant conservation policies to retain, regain or manage these (with particular reference to heights and setbacks of any proposed new housing on the estate and adjacent to it on Sekisui P/L owned lands;
2)demonstrating how the Landscape Conservation Policies in section 6 of the 2005 Clive Lucas, Stapleton & Partners Landscape Conservation Management Plan have been synthetised with those in section 7 of the 2008 CMP, or revising section 7's policies to do so;
3)identifying the current condition and prioritised (short, medium and long-term) conservation works required (e.g.: pruning, removal, replanting, mulching, fertilising for trees/shrubs, such as those shown in figure 5.2 in the homestead environs) of all significant landscape elements across the SHR curtilage, including paving, drives, paths, possible archaeological sites or remains of known earlier structures or elements, movable heritage items (as done for built heritage items in Appendices A & B of the 2008 CMP - this could form the basis of the proposed Landscape Maintenance Plan recommended in section 7.4.6 subsection 21, page 121);
4)fleshing out in detail the preliminary prescriptions of Table 2 (outline schedule of works - landscape items; and Table 3 - other required reports and assessments) in the 2008 CMP);
5)demonstrated connections between a revised CMP 2008, the draft DCP, heritage agreement and a VPA covering adjacent Sekisui P/L lands, ensuring cultural heritage value conservation is part of the VPA, linking the Sekisui P/L lands and the SHR curtilage to Gledswood's ongoing conservation and management. These connections need to explain how the draft LEP and DCP controls have been informed by the relevant significance and conservation policies in the CMP section 7;
b) notes that Sekisui P/L and Camden Council are negotiating over finalisation of a Voluntary Planning Agreement for lands surrounding Gledswood with a timeframe of six months given by the Department for completion of this task;
d)notes that a draft Heritage Agreement will be presented for comment at future time.

Please be advised that this advice is in principle only and that in due course an application under Section 60 of the Heritage Act would be required including the consideration of all information appropriate to such an application including public submissions as necessary. I trust this feedback is useful to you in your progressing the final plan and related documents. If you have any enquires with regards to the above, please contact Stuart Read on telephone 9873 8554 in the first instance.


Yours sincerely


17/02/2011

Vincent Sicari
Manager
Conservation Team
Heritage Branch
Department of Planning
AS DELEGATE OF THE NSW HERITAGE COUNCIL
17 February 2011

cc. Mr. Greg Wright, General Manager, Camden Council, DX 25807, Camden
Feb 17 2011
39Minister makes heritage agreementHeritage Agreement - Heritage Council recommend the Minister sign the agreement Contact: Gary Estcourt
Phone: (02) 9873 8562
Fax: (02) 9873 8599
Email: Gary.estcourt@heritage.nsw.gov.au
File: 10/01544
Our Ref: B570033
Your Ref:

TN Consulting
PO Box 619
NORTHBRIDGE NSW 1560
Attention: Keith Apps
Dear Mr Apps

RE: GLEDSWOOD HERITAGE AGREEMENT

At its meeting on 7th December 2011, the Approvals Committee, as delegate of the Heritage Council of NSW, considered the issue of the Heritage Agreement being prepared for Gledswood and made the following resolution:

In accordance with Section 39 of the Heritage Act 1977 recommends that the Minister enter into the Heritage Agreement for Gledswood with Caldla Pty Ltd subject to the following:

a.The Conservation Works Timetable in the Agreement is amended to match that contained in Attachment D of this report;
b.A clause be inserted to the Heritage Agreement that has a 5 yearly review of the recurrent funding amount; and
c.Provision is allowed for the increase of funding if the detailed plans indicate that the funding is proven to be inadequate.

If you have any questions regarding the above matter please contact Gary Estcourt at the Heritage Branch on (02) 9873 8562.

Yours sincerely

13/12/2011

Vincent Sicari
Manager
Conservation Team
Office of Environment and Heritage
AS DELEGATE OF THE NSW HERITAGE COUNCIL

cc.The General Manager
Camden City Council
DX25807 Camden
Dec 13 2011
21(1)(b)Conservation Plan submitted for endorsementRevised CMP for endorsement Feb 15 2012
39Minister makes heritage agreementMinister signs Heritage Agreement May 9 2012

PDF Standard exemptions for works requiring Heritage Council approval

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Heritage Act - State Heritage Register 0169222 Dec 06 19111953
Heritage Act - Under consideration for SHR/IHO listingCurtilage amendment (Corade Developments Pty Ltd) 09 Jan 15   
Local Environmental Plan  21 Feb 92   
National Trust of Australia register  775223 Mar 78   
Register of the National EstateGledswood & Garden3252, 325321 Mar 78   

Study details

TitleYearNumberAuthorInspected byGuidelines used
Colonial Landscapes of the Cumberland Plain and Camden, NSW20004.33.3Morris, C., & Britton, G./NSW National Trust (for the Heritage Council of NSW)National Trust of Australia (NSW) Yes
Camden Significant Trees and Vegetated Landscape Study1993pp 121-123Landarc Landscape ArchitectsCamden Municiple Council Yes
Camden Park Estate Conservation Plan1989 Howard Tanner and Associates  Yes

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
TourismAttraction Homepage2012Gledswood View detail
WrittenCarroll, Brian1983The Hume - Australia’s Highway of History - a Heritage Field Guide,
WrittenCarroll, Brian1983The Hume - Australia’s Highway of History - a heritage field guide,
WrittenClive Lucas Stapleton & Partners2005Landscape Conservation Management Plan: Former Gledswood Estate, Catherine Field
Management PlanColleen Morris & Geoffrey Britton2000Colonial Landscapes of the Cumberland Plain and Camden - Volume 2
WrittenEco Logical Australia2016Gledswood, El Caballo Blanco & Camden Lakeside Final Aboriginal Test Excavation Report
WrittenEco Logical Australia2015Gledswood South Residential and Sewer Carrier – Draft Aboriginal Cultural Heritage Assessment report
WrittenEverett, David2004Frere's Vineyard - Vine Pedigree X in Macarthur (News)
WrittenEverett, David2003'Vine Pedigree VI: Gledswood - the estate’
WrittenGML Heritage2017Gledswood, Lot 1203 - Interpretation Plan
WrittenGML Heritage2017Lot 1203 Subdivision, Gledswood - Photographic Archival Recording
WrittenGML Heritage2017Lot 1203 Subdivision, Gledswood - Archaeological Research Design & Excavation Methodology
WrittenGodden Mackay Logan, in association with Geoffrey Britton2011Gledswood Conservation Management Plan
WrittenGodden Mackay Logan, in association with Geoffrey Britton2011Gledswood - Conservation Management Plan
WrittenHughes Trueman P/L2008Gledswood Homestead, Stables and Convict House - Structural Condition Report
WrittenLandarc Landscape Architects1993Camden Significant trees and Landscape Study
OtherSheedy, David1977Listing Proposal for National Trust
WrittenTropman & Tropman Architects2003Conservation Management Plan: Gledswood, Camden Valley Way, Catherine Field, SSW
WrittenTropman & Tropman Architects2003Draft Master Plan Strategy: Gledswood, Camden Valley Way, Catherine Field, NSW

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

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Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Heritage Office
Database number: 5051540
File number: EF14/4510; s90/05984


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