Nature conservation

Parks, reserves and protected areas

Grazing study

The NSW Government has approved a scientifically monitored grazing study in river red gum and cypress parks and reserves. The parks involved in the study are:

  • already being grazed due to their conversion from state forests to national park, so the study is an extension of an existing use
  • those declared under the National Park Estate (Riverina Red Gum Reservations) Act 2010 and the National Park Estate (South-western Cypress Reservations) Act 2010.

The study will be overseen by independent facilitator Richard Bull who will report to the Minister for the Environment. The facilitator will oversee the assessment of the social, economic and ecological impacts and benefits of grazing.

Like all lands in the reserve system, lands that are subject to the grazing study are regulated under the Biodiversity Conservation Act 2016 and the National Parks and Wildlife Act 1974.

Questions and answers

Why are you allowing grazing in national parks?

Grazing already occurs in some national parks under current legislation and policy, such as in Oolambeyan National Park in the Riverina region. Grazing is permitted when it can be linked to conservation outcomes.

The current grazing study was recommended by the Natural Resources Commission. Through the study, the triple bottom line of the social, economic and ecological impacts and benefits of grazing will be examined.

The study will only occur:

  • in parks that are already being grazed due to their conversion from state forests to national park
  • in parks declared under the National Park Estate (Riverina Red Gum Reservations) Act 2010 and the National Park Estate (South-western Cypress Reservations) Act 2010.

How will the study work?

The study is being overseen by independent facilitator, Richard Bull.

The facilitator will receive advice from regional committees, experts and stakeholders on the design, implementation and monitoring of the study. Advice will also be sought on its social and economic benefits.

How are these parks different from other national parks?

These parks are largely already subject to occupation permits allowing grazing from when they were state forests. They are currently in a transition phase.

What outcomes are you hoping to achieve?

The ecological component of the grazing study, properly established and monitored under scientific principles, will provide the necessary information to assess if and how grazing can be undertaken to provide conservation benefits in the red gum and cypress reserves and associated lands.

The social and economic component of the study will look at the non-ecological impacts and benefits of grazing.

When will the study start?

Richard Bull, the independent facilitator, will begin work in November 2012. Other timeframes will flow on from this appointment.

Will you now also allow grazing on former properties?

The study is limited to selected parks subject to National Park Estate (Riverina Red Gum Reservations) Act 2010 and the National Park Estate (South-western Cypress Reservations) Act 2010.

How will you ensure threatened species are not damaged?

Threatened species are protected under the Biodiversity Conservation Act 2016. Like all lands in the national park system, the lands on which the grazing study will occur are regulated under this Act.

The study will be established and monitored under scientific principles.

How much land will be involved in the study?

This will be determined as part of the design and development of the study.

How can I find out more?

For more information, phone (02) 6966 8100.

Page last updated: 16 August 2017