Threat abatement plans

Threat abatement plans explain how threats to wildlife and ecological communities can be reduced or eliminated.

Bitou bush (Chrysanthemoides monilifera subsp rotundifolia), also known as boneseed, Munmorah State Conservation AreaA threat abatement plan is a statutory (authorised by law) document. It sets out how threats to species should be reduced or eliminated.

Threat abatement plans are developed for key threatening processes listed by the NSW Threatened Species Scientific Committee. Ministers and public authorities are required to take appropriate action to implement these plans.

A threat abatement plan can be used when:

  • authorities consider development applications under planning laws
  • people apply for a licence to harm threatened species
  • people want to know how to manage the threat.

A draft threat abatement plan is made available to the public for comment before it is approved by the Minister for the Environment.

More about key threatening processes.

Examples of threats

Bitou bush and boneseed

A threat abatement plan has been developed to reduce the impact of bitou bush and boneseed (Chrysanthemoides monilifera) on threatened species, populations and ecological communities.

Read the bitou bush and boneseed threat abatement plan.

Red fox

Red fox (Vulpes vulpes), Royal National ParkA threat abatement plan has been developed to reduce the impact of red fox (Vulpes vulpes) predation on native animals.

Read the fox threat abatement plan.

Plague minnow

The plague minnow threat abatement plan has been developed to reduce the impact of this introduced fish (Gambusia holbrooki) on native animals, particularly threatened frogs.

Find out more about plague minnow predation.