Wild dog management 2010-11

Wild dogs can have significant impacts on livestock, especially sheep. As a result, a pest control order for wild dogs has been declared under the Rural Lands Protection Act 1998. Under the order, managers of controlled land have an obligation to eradicate wild dogs by any lawful method. All land in New South Wales has been identified as controlled land.

Date
1 June 2012
Publisher
Office of Environment and Heritage
Type
Publication
Status
Final
Cost
Free
Language
English
Tags
  • ISBN 978-1-74293-699-4
  • ID OEH20120512
  • File PDF 0.2MB
  • Pages 11
  • Name wild-dog-management-201011-120512.pdf

'Wild dog' refers to any dog living in the wild, including feral dogs (Canis lupus familiaris), dingoes (Canis lupus dingo) and hybrids of the two.

Wild dogs can have both positive and negative impacts on the environment.

Predation by wild dogs can reduce the impacts of overgrazing in arid and semi-arid ecosystems by regulating the abundances of native and exotic herbivores. Wild dogs may also suppress the abundances of cats and foxes, thereby reducing the threat these introduced predators pose to a broad range of small- to medium-sized ground-dwelling mammals and ground-nesting birds.

Conversely, under some circumstances predation by wild dogs may have significant direct impacts on threatened species, such as koalas.