Miss Traill's House | NSW Environment, Energy and Science

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Heritage

Miss Traill's House

Item details

Name of item: Miss Traill's House
Other name/s: All Saints Rectory, Entally & Wyoming Lodge
Type of item: Built
Group/Collection: Residential buildings (private)
Category: House
Primary address: 321 Russell Street, Bathurst, NSW 2795
Parish: Bathurst
County: Bathurst
Local govt. area: Bathurst Regional
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
321 Russell StreetBathurstBathurst RegionalBathurstBathurstPrimary Address

Statement of significance:

Miss Traill's house is of great significance to the Bathurst district not only throught its historical associations with the Kite and Lee families but also its architectural detailing. It is the only substantial house of its period remaining in Bathurst structurally unaltered in any major respect. The garden preserves a typical pattern of geometrically designed flower beds. A special quality of the house is the way in which it has been lived in by Miss Traill and the family collection has been retained.
Date significance updated: 18 Apr 06
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Designer/Maker: Henry Kitchen
Builder/Maker: Reverend Thomas Sharpe
Construction years: 1845-
Physical description: A late Colonial Georgian house built of a combination of bricklaying styles. The c. 1845 main house and the c. 1855 Rev. Sharpe’s study comprise of English bond (now painted), the kitchen and laundry brickwork is a variation of Flemish bond, while the c. 1905 repairs are a pseudo Flemish bond. Corrugated iron dated c. 1905 covers the original timber shingled roof. The turned verandah columns are original although the brackets to the verandah posts are an 1872 embellishment. The verandah floor is of modern brick. The main house, study and kitchen have very deep chimney stacks. French doors lead to the garden and the house contains four paneled internal doors.
The garden is designed with a clear hierarchy with the superior rooms at the front of the house facing the garden while the rooms at the back of the house with a lower standard of detail face the service courtyard. Features of the country styled garden include a courtyard, wishing well, sundial, stone benches, pergola, greenhouse, a drying yard with clothes prop, shed and garage.

The contents of the house include English and Australian furniture dating from c. 1810, family memorabilia such as photographs, china, racing times, trophies, early Australian items, enameled pottery, ceramics, metalwares (trays, vases, candle sticks), glassware, rugs, books, and notable landscape and portrait paintings.

The properties extensive art collection includes a portrait of Emily Kite by Backler (1847), two equestrian oils by Joseph Fowles (1810-1878), ‘Harbour study with barquentine’ attributed to the surveyor George Evans (1780-1852), and one of shipping in an Australian harbour by F.L Montague (1869). A second group of fine oil paintings appear to be in the same period as the first group but by European painters. These include two early nineteenth century portraits of children apparently by Tinier, a painting of a ‘coach hunting party’ by W. Williams, and a European landscape by Charles Leslie (1879). The third group of lesser paintings comprises of watercolours, Impressionist paintings by Edward Combes (1830-95), post-Impressionist sketches and a large abstract painting by John Power (1881-1943).

Other significant artifacts include; The Sydney Cup won by Barbelle in 1870, Silver cups presented in the 1870s to George Lee for show success with Durham cattle, and an invitation to Mr and Mrs Lee to the 1901 opening of the first Australian Commonwealth Parliament. (Stephenson and McKerrow, 1999)
Physical condition and/or
Archaeological potential:
Physical condition is good.
Date condition updated:18 Apr 06
Modifications and dates: 1855 - Addition of room 13. 1905 - Tie rods inserted, Internal replastering, external gables constructed, roughcast applied, verandah detailing changed, skirting renewed, external brickwork painted red and pointed, bathroom installed. 1923 - Minor changes are made to the house. 1940 - Bathroom and kitchen are remodeled). 1977 - Repair floor and insertion of vents, new kitchen door. 1978 - Repairs to chimney tops, roof gutters, outside toilets, ceiling replaced in bathroom, and plaster repairs to bedroom. New fencing. 1979 - Glass cupboards installed in dining room, chimneys of the main house rebuilt in a more Colonial form, bedroom ceiling replaced by gyprock (some). 1981 - Herb garden completed, hand basin fitted in lavatory, slow combustion heater installed in pantry. 1983 - Gardeners shed and lavatory demolished. 1984 - Toilet block constructed, work carried out to dining and drawing rooms. 1985 - Repairs to ceiling, plaster and painting in heritage colours. 1987 - Shed constructed. 1990 - Major stabilisation work including underpinning, repair to kitchen roof, new door and partition between kitchen and pantry, new linoleum, bench tops, sink and taps in the kitchen. 1991 - Cloth electric light flex in hall way and dining room replaced by plastic flex. 1992 - Cut of barrier and dish drain installed south west side of the house. 1993 - Work to kitchen roof. (National Trust of Australia (NSW), 1999)
Further information: supported by Bathurst/Evans focus group 27/3/2002
Current use: House/Museum
Former use: Rectory, Wyoming Lodge School, Private House

History

Historical notes: On the 29th January 1845 the Reverend Thomas Sharpe, the first Rector of All Saints Bathurst, was granted allotments 1 and 2 in Russell Street Bathurst on which he built his rectory. The construction on Reverend Thomas Sharpe’s Colonial Georgian styled house is believed to have begun around this time.

After the death of Reverend Thomas and Mrs Sharpe in 1877 their eldest son John inherited the property. John lived there for two periods totaling fourteen years. John let the property to a series of tenants for a period of thirteen years. One of the tenants, Mrs Mary Newton operated the Wyoming Lodge a school for girls between 1869 to 1902.

In 1904 the property was sold to William Alfred McLean, a local builder who undertook extensive renovations to the property. McLean’s refurbishment gave the house a federation look.

In 1923 William McLean sold the property to Robert Lionel Gilmour, a local glazier. The Gilmour's made minor changes to the property.

In 1932 Mrs Gertrude Traill and her daughter Ida rented the house, purchasing it in 1937. Soon after the purchase they modernized the kitchen and bathroom. Later changes were stylistic in character and aimed at giving the house a more colonial look.

Ida Traill was a fourth generation descendant of William Lee and Thomas Kite, both of whom settled in Bathurst in 1818. Lee and Kite were the most successful of Macquarie’s ten 1818 settlers. As a result of childhood contact with her grandfather George Lee and his wife Emily (nee Kite) who lived at Leeholme, a large homestead close to Bathurst, she became interested in family history. Through inheritance and purchase she acquired a significant collection of artifacts relating to four generations of the Lee family in Bathurst. These items, together with her own furniture, furnishings, paintings and ceramics, were left to the National Trust in 1976 along with the house and grounds. (Stephenson and McKerrow, 1999)

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Housing the clergy and religious-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Housing -townsfolk and terraces-
6. Educating-Educating Education-Activities associated with teaching and learning by children and adults, formally and informally. Private independent schooling-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Designing in an exemplary architectural style-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Miss Ida Trail local historian and geneaologist-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Rev. Thomas Sharpe, Anglican Minister-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Association with Mary Newton, teacher-

Assessment of significance

SHR Criteria a)
[Historical significance]
Miss Traill’s House has historical significant as it reflects not only the history of the Kites and Lee families but also has great potential to represent the early history of Bathurst and its district viewed through the lens of the lifestyle, interests and possessions of Miss Ida Traill.
SHR Criteria b)
[Associative significance]
Through the association with a range of people including Reverend Thomas Sharpe, William McLean, Mary Newton, Robert Gilmour and the Lee, Kite and Traill families the house, grounds and collections provide evidence of the ways of life in the Bathurst districts. (Stephenson and McKerrow, 1999)
SHR Criteria c)
[Aesthetic significance]
The cottage is aesthetically significant using design techniques such as a pyramid shaped roof and the use of the so called Hambeldon plan, a sophisticated cottage design with a garden and entrance front, introduced into NSW by the architect Henry Kitchen. The house, grounds and collection show unusually accurate evidence of Miss Traill’s lifestyle. (Stephenson and McKerrow, 1999)
SHR Criteria e)
[Research potential]
Miss Triall’s house is technically significant as it is contributing to the historical, social and environmental construction of Bathurst in the mid-eighteenth to nineteenth centuries. The unique architectural design of the house in conjunction with the extensive collection of artifacts relating to the history of one influential family provides a strong foundation in representing the construction of the Bathurst districts. (Stephenson and McKerrow, 1999)
SHR Criteria f)
[Rarity]
The collection of rare artworks, trophies, photographs and memorabilia represents the historical, cultural and social construction of the times. Notable artworks include a portrait of Emily Kite by Backler, 1847, and two equestrian oils by Joseph Fowles.(Stephenson and McKerrow, 1999)
SHR Criteria g)
[Representativeness]
Miss Traill’s House displays an accurate representation of class and era through a complete collection of furnishings and memorabilia associated with Kite and Lee families. It is the only substantial house of its period remaining in Bathurst structurally unaltered in any major respect. The garden preserves a typical pattern of geometrically designed flowerbeds. (Stephenson and McKerrow, 1999)
Integrity/Intactness: The integrity of the house has been maintained by preserving the furnishings and property of Miss Traill’s. The house and property are being maintained and have been unaltered from the way in which Miss Traill left it. (Stephenson and McKerrow, 1999)
Assessment criteria: Items are assessed against the PDF State Heritage Register (SHR) Criteria to determine the level of significance. Refer to the Listings below for the level of statutory protection.

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Local Environmental PlanMiss Traill's House6619 Nov 14   
Within a conservation area on an LEPBathurst Conservation Area 19 Nov 14   
Heritage study     

Study details

TitleYearNumberAuthorInspected byGuidelines used
Bathurst Regional Council Heritage Review2005 Hickson in assoc. with Bathurst Regional CouncilB.J. Hickson Yes
Bathurst City Council Heritage Study1990A448Hughes Trueman LudlowHughes Trueman Ludlow No
BRC City Conservation Area Heritage Review2006 Hickson in assoc with BRCB.J. Hickson Yes

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
WrittenNational Trust of Australia Miss Traill's House

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

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Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Local Government
Database number: 1080311


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