Sp012 : Southall | NSW Environment & Heritage

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Heritage

Sp012 : Southall

Item details

Name of item: Sp012 : Southall
Other name/s: The Vicarage; Karkoola
Primary address: 353 Great Western Highway, Springwood, NSW 2777
Local govt. area: Blue Mountains
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
353 Great Western HighwaySpringwoodBlue Mountains   Primary Address

Statement of significance:

The house has high local significance as a gesture of philanthropy towards the Anglican church and for its later use for community purposes. Southall is built in the Victorian Regency style as a substantial house befitting the rector of the adjacent Christ Church, Springwood. It is a well built and well proportioned sandstone residence with and unusual surviving terracotta shingled roof. The house is complemented by its garden setting which maintains its curtilage to the east.
Date significance updated: 19 Feb 00
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Construction years: 1886-1886
Physical description: Southall is a substantial single storey hipped roof sandstone house with an encircling single slope verandah facing east towards the adjacent Christ Church, Springwood. A rear gabled south wing is at the west end of the south verandah. A gabled west wing on the west boundary of the site is connected to the south wing by a skillioned room at the south end of the kitchen. Another skillion room is at the north end of the kitchen wing. The kitchen is on a north-south axis and the skillions have parapetted sandstone west walls on the west boundary of the site.

The house has a roof of diagonally laid terracotta shingled roof with boxed eaves and there are two sandstone chimneys to the main house with moulded corbels. The kitchen wing has a sandstone chimney with a wide sandstone corbels and a glazed terracotta pot. The south and kitchen wings have diagonally laid terracotta shingled roofs.

The house generally has sparrowpicked sandstone walls with dressed stone quoins and cast iron ventilation grilles. The south wing has splayed weatherboard cladding and the east, south and north walls of the kitchen wing are English bond brickwork. The west wall of the kitchen wing is random coursed sparrowpecked sandstone, continuing the walls of the adjacent skillions.

The verandah has ionic sandstone columns (possibly replacing earlier columns)

The entry door is centrally placed on the east wall and is a 1/2 glazed 4 panel door with a toplight and sidelights. The glass is etched. Either side of the front door are 2 panelled french doors with 2 pane toplights and 3 panelled louvred shutters.

2 over 2 pane double hung windows with 3 panel louvred shutters open to the north and south verandahs.

The gravel driveway and paths from the Great Western Highway have stone edging.

The gateposts are simple stone piers , one with the name SOUTHALL carved on the south face.
Physical condition and/or
Archaeological potential:
Good - except chimney
Date condition updated:20 Dec 99
Modifications and dates: The end of the south verandah is enclosed with splayed weatherboards with a 4 panelled door and 2 over 2 pane double hung windows.
The west verandah has been infilled
North wall of south wing infilled with splayed weatherboards.
The verandah has been concreted
An acrylic roofed walkway links the main wing and the kitchen.
Gabled brick garage on an east-west axis in the northwest corner of the yard
Swimming pool in northeast corner of yard.
Current use: Residence
Former use: Residence; Rectory; Grammar School; Maternity Home; Children's Home

History

Historical notes: Charles Moore, a wealthy Anglican businessman and politician, built Moorecourt in 1876 close to the site for the proposed Anglican church. In August 1885 the Rev. Edward Cranswick was appointed rector of Springwood with Lawson and in 1886 Moore built a stone house for him. The house was leased to the church for a peppercorn rent from 1 January 1887. The church, which lay between the rector’s home and Moorecourt, was built in 1888-9, but in 1889 Moore and Cranswick had a violent disagreement over a reredos from St Phillip’s, Sydney, installed at Christ Church by Moore. As a result, Moore did not renew the lease and the rector left for other leased premises. The name The Vicarage is in itself odd, since it was in fact a rectory, and in any case applies only to the first three years of its existence. Thereafter it has been successively named Karkoola and Southall and used as a children’s home during World War I, as a grammar school and as a maternity hospital run by Matron Durham, who gave her name to the adjacent lane. It has been a private residence for the past forty years and is currently in 1999 for sale.

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Health-Activities associated with preparing and providing medical assistance and/or promoting or maintaining the well being of humans (none)-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. (none)-
6. Educating-Educating Education-Activities associated with teaching and learning by children and adults, formally and informally. (none)-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Religion-Activities associated with particular systems of faith and worship (none)-

Assessment of significance

SHR Criteria a)
[Historical significance]
The house has high local significance as a gesture of philanthropy towards the Anglican church and for its later use for community purposes.
SHR Criteria c)
[Aesthetic significance]
Southall is built in the Victorian Regency style as a substantial house befitting the rector of the adjacent Christ Church, Springwood. It is a well built and well proportioned sandstone residence with and unusual surviving terracotta shingled roof. The house is complemented by its garden setting which maintains its curtilage to the east.
Integrity/Intactness: Reasonable
Assessment criteria: Items are assessed against the PDF State Heritage Register (SHR) Criteria to determine the level of significance. Refer to the Listings below for the level of statutory protection.

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Local Environmental PlanLEP2005SP01207 Oct 05 122 
Heritage study SP012   

Study details

TitleYearNumberAuthorInspected byGuidelines used
Blue Mountains Heritage Study1983SP012Croft & Associates Pty Ltd & Meredith Walker  Yes
Heritage Study Review, Blue Mountains1992SP012Tropman and Tropman  Yes
Blue Mountains Heritage Register Review1999SP012Jack, R. I. for University of SydneyRIJ & PH Yes
Technical Audit BM Heritage Register2008SP012Blue Mountains City CouncilCity Planning Branch No

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
WrittenLambert, L. T.1989A History of Christ Church, Springwood
Oral HistoryMurphy, Mrs., owner1999Interview, 8 November

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

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(Click on thumbnail for full size image and image details)

Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Local Government
Database number: 1170160


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