K032 : Carrington Hotel | NSW Environment & Heritage

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K032 : Carrington Hotel

Item details

Name of item: K032 : Carrington Hotel
Other name/s: Great Western Hotel
Primary address: 15-47 Katoomba Street, Katoomba, NSW 2780
Local govt. area: Blue Mountains
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
15-47 Katoomba StreetKatoombaBlue Mountains   Primary Address
86 Bathurst RoadKatoombaBlue Mountains   Alternate Address

Statement of significance:

Criterion (a) An item is important in the course, or pattern, of New South Wales’ cultural or natural history

The Carrington has high state significance as the establishment which, more than any other, created Katoomba as a pre-eminent tourist destination. It was a quintessential high Victorian grand hotel, remodelled to suit the expectations of an Edwardian generation. The highly visible chimney-stack, the highest structure in Katoomba, is significant as a symbol of a major and early private enterprise in electricity generation, supplying power to an entire urban community as well as the hotel. The owners of the hotel, in particular the local businessman and politician, Goyder, and the more cosmopolitan Smith, have added to its historical significance, attracting, in their different ways, newsworthy clientele, just as the celebrated governor who lent his name to the hotel gave a special cachet to the establishment.

In its long heyday under Smith, the Carrington earned significance for the glamour, wealth, political influence and number of its guests, which attracted reactions fromn the community. The reputation of the grand hotel has remained potent throughout the state as well as in Sydney and the Mountains. The public bars, first on Bathurst Road and more recently in the old bank building, have local social significance in the shadow of the more exclusive hotel.

The remaining former power-house and its towering chimney are rare surviving evidence of an early electricity plant for a rural town.

The garden and grounds of the Carrington have importance as an integral component of a renowned grand Victorian hotel of state significance. The early introduction, in the 1880s, of a tennis court as a component of the grounds demonstrates the evolving role of recreation in nineteenth-century resorts.

The overall layout, sandstone walling and gateposts, terracing, remnant garden edging and bollards, established by 1911-13 and retaining aspects of the earlier garden, including from the 1890s and early 1900s plantings of Araucaria bidwillii, Pinus radiata, a Magnolia grandiflora, the plane and beech trees, with additional elements - gazebos, the stone seat and rose garden - added by the 1920s, are of historical importance as surviving elements of a garden associated with a grand hotel with an early twentieth-century setting which is intact.

The Carrington is a rare surviving Victorian resort hotel that has retained its setting overlooking a large forecourt. It is a rare example of a Victorian resort hotel in a town setting, with an early twentieth-century garden layout in which design elements survive to an unusual degree.

The Carrington’s gardens are representative of a very small group of large tourist hotels, especially those within mountain retreat areas, which have maintained their associated gardens. The Hydro Majestic at Medlow Baths, and Jenolan Caves House are other examples among the few remaining hotels whose gardens were designed to function as resort gardens from their inception.


Criterion (b) An item has strong or special association with the life or works of a person, or group of persons, of importance in New South Wales' cultural or natural history

The three persons with which the Carrington is especially associated are Lord Carrington, a distinguished governor of New South Wales who consented to having the hotel renamed after him in 1886; Frederick Goyder, a former grazier become a local businessman and politician, who played the leading role in the successful establishment of the hotel and its garden in the late Victorian period; and Sir James Joynton Smith, a self-made man, hotelier, newspaper-owner and sportsman, who gave the frontage of the hotel and its gardens their present form in the years just before World War I. Carrington and Smith are of state significance, Goyder of considerable local significance.

The hotel is also significant as an early and fine example of the work of the architect John Kirkpatrick who went on to design the Commonwealth Bank in Pitt Street and Martin Place, Sydney, and the Royal Hotel at Randwick. Kirkpatrick’s Italianate design for the Carrington is clearly discernible despite the twentieth-century alterations.

The Carrington garden also has an association with the career of the prominent landscape designer Paul Sorensen, since it was the first place at which he worked in New South Wales: without this taste of the Blue Mountains, it is likely that Sorensen would have left Austrsalia and never created the gardens in the Blue Mountains and elsewhere in New South Wales for which he is celebrated. Sorensen is designer of state significance.

The social significance of the Carrington in its long heyday under Smith was state-wide, because of the glamour, wealth, political influence and number of its guests, which attracted reactions from the community and the media.


Criterion ( c ): An item is important in demonstrating aesthetic characteristics and/or a high degree of creative or technical achievement in NSW.

The Carrington Hotel is a fine extant example of a Victorian Italianate style resort hotel with Edwardian remodelling that retains its setting through the retention of the generous forecourt. The overlays of art nouveau style leadlight glass add an unusual dimension to the architecture.

The location of the Carrington at virtually the highest point in Katoomba and the sweeping approach drives and lawns and prominent mature plantings have made the hotel an important landmark in the town from the time it was built.

The chimney of the Carrington, considered to be one of the highest freestanding chimneys in the state, makes it a landmark from all directions in the town.

The garages and former powerhouse facing Parke Street provide a strong semi-industrial element to the streetscape near the edges of the town centre.

The garden and grounds have an aesthetic significance on a local level for their landmark mature plantings, especially the Bunya Bunya pines (Araucaria bidwillii) and chimney stack, sandstone walling and gates on Katoomba Street.

The gardens and grounds have also an aesthetic signficance for the contribution they make to the Katoomba street-scape.

Criterion (d) An item has strong or special association with a particular community or cultural group in New South Wales for social, cultural or spiritual reasons.

In its long heyday under Smith, the Carrington earned significance for the glamour, wealth, political influence and number of its guests, which attracted reactions from the community. The reputation of the grand hotel has remained potent throughout the state as well as in Sydney and the Mountains. The public bars, first on Bathurst Road and more recently in the old bank building, have local social significance in the shadow of the more exclusive hotel.

The garden and grounds have a social significance on a local level for public appreciation of their landmark mature plantings, especially the Bunya Bunya pines (Araucaria bidwillii) and chimney stack, sandstone walling and gates on Katoomba Street.

The gardens and grounds have also a social signficance for the contribution they make to community appreciation of the Katoomba street-scape.

The grounds of the Carrington, particularly the forecourt to Katoomba Street, have significance to the local community as a place for gathering to mark special community events such as the re-enactment in 1951 of the first crossing of the Blue Mountains in 1813.


The power-house chimney which dominates the streetscape is of significance both to local people and to visitors as a civic symbol of Katoomba

Criterion (e) An item has potential to yield information which will contribute to an understanding of New South Wales' cultural or natural history.

Hotel Buildings

In addition to their historic, architectural and aesthetic qualities, the substantial buildings of the Carrington Hotel complex are also significant for their archaeological potential. Although no detailed assessment of archaeological resources has been completed, the 1987 Conservation Plan includes some use of visible physical evidence in determining the sequencing and phasing of the early stages of the complex. Where deposits have not been removed by subsequent disturbance or misadventure (building works, repairs, etc) they may be expected to yield infomation relevant to the original construction and occupation of the building. Areas within the building which are likely to have archaeological potential include under floor and foundation areas, wall cavities and roof spaces.

Hotel Grounds

The documentary evidence available indicates several phases of modification of the grounds. Physical evidence of older features such as terracing/paths, site of the croquet lawn and tennis court still survives and is evident as the surface contours, especially in the area of the grounds between the front of the main hotel and Katoomba Street - There am also areas of former hard-paved surfaces. Kerb and guttering along the driveway and features such as the handsome gate posts. Blocks from a removed gate post are also extant. Landscape archaeology may also be expected to be able to clarify matters such as the precise position of now vanished plantings. In particular the palms, which are proposed for reinstatement within the current Katoomba Town Square scheme.

Site of the Clarendon

The site of the Clarendon guesthouse is remarkable for its intactness. The site contains considerable surviving evidence, which illustrates its former occupation and historical connections. The outline of the building is clearly evident at ground level and the site also contains substantial building footings in sandstone and brick, retaining walls, steps and hard-paved landscape features such as former path and yard areas as well as the former tennis court. It is likely that this site may contain intact archaeological deposits associated with the construction and occupation of the early Clarendon. Subsurface elements such as water supply or other service features may also survive. As an archaeological site in the context of Katoomba this site is remarkable for its ability to demonstrate. Although a number of archaeological sites have been scheduled in prior heritage studies, the site of the Clarendon is one of the very few easy to interpret, comprehensible and accessible sites.

Overall

The Carrington Hotel site is significant for its archaelogical potential in relation to the history of recreation and tourism which have played such a key role in the development of Katoomba and the Blue Mountains.

Criterion (f) An item possesses uncommon, rare or endangered aspects of New South Wales' cultural or natural history

Criterion (g) An item is important in demonstrating the principal characteristics of a class of New South Wales' cultural or natural places or cultural or natural environments.

The Carrington's gardens are representative of a group of large tourist hotels with associated gardens, especially those within mountain retreat areas such as the Hydro Majestic at Medlow Bath and Jenolan Caves house.

The reputation of the Grand Hotel has remained potent throughout the state as well as in Sydney and the Mountains. The public bars, first on Bathurst Road, and more recently in the old Bank Building on Katoomba Street, have local representative significance in the shadow of the more exclusive hotel.
Date significance updated: 12 Mar 01
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Designer/Maker: John Kirkpatrick (1882); Edward H. Hogben with Goyder Brothers (1911-13)
Builder/Maker: F. Drewett, 1882
Construction years: 1882-1913
Physical description: The Carrington Hotel comprises a main resort hotel building constructed in stages during the late nineteenth and early twentieth century, two bars, garages and a former power station. The hotel is sited close to the highest point in the Katoomba town centre and looks east to take in views towards Leura and over the Jamison Valley. Th siting of the hotel retains its impressive forecourt and gardens. The Carrington Hotel is a landmark in the town centre and, with the tall chimneystack of the former powerhouse to the rear, a landmark in the wider townscape.

To the south of the hotel driveway is the site of the Clarendon, a former guesthouse and residence that was at one time known as the Carrington Annex.

Main Building
The main building of the Carrington Hotel is a late Victorian Italianate building facing east on a balustraded sandstone terrace overlaid with Federation Free Style (Art Nouveau) modifications. The ground floor verandah is topped with a balustraded balcony to the first floor. Arched leadlight windows separate the verandah from an inner sunroom. The upper (second) floor of the main building (behind the verandah and sunroom) has a flat roof that once formed a widow's walk. The original dormer windows to the second floor have been amalgamated into a 1920's addition. This assembly is flanked by two storey hipped roofed Victorian Italianate wings.

South of the main part of the hotel is a two storey hipped roof sandstone wing of six bays, which appears to have been built in the 1880s, soon after the original part of the hotel. The roof is of terracotta tiles. The original windows were 2 pane double hung sashes. There is evidence of an early verandah on the south side with doors opening onto it at the west end of the elevation.

North of the hotel are two Federation free style wings of face brickwork with leadlight bay windows.

Bathurst Road Bar
The Bathurst Road bar of the Carrington Hotel is a two storey Federation Free Style building with art nouveau detailing. Divided into three bays by brick pilasters, the building has a parapetted front facing north to Bathurst Road with a central arch in the parapet echoed by the arch over the central entry. The walls between the pilasters have tiled finishes. Arched openings to the side bays are emphasised by rendered mouldings and keystones.

A bay window in the central bay of the first floor is faced with copper and features a frieze panel with art nouveau decoration and a flat roof.

The entry features a terrazzo threshold emblazoned with the name "Carrington".

Katoomba Street Bar (Carrington Inn Bar)
The Katoomba Street bar is a two storey brick building in the Federation Free Style facing east to Katoomba Street. It features brick pilasters flanking a large brick arch with moulded brick cornices. The panels above the arch are finished with green tiles. A timber balustrade and sign at first floor level divides the arch horizontally. The entry to the bar from Katoomba Street has a tiled and slate threshold, although evidence survives of the original slate threshold.

The south elevation of the building faces the Carrington forecourt and continues the brickwork with a wide roughcast panel at first floor level. A central gable to this elevation is half timbered with roughcast panels.

The building has roughcast chimneys with brick strapwork. The roof is hipped and gabled behind the Katoomba Street parapet wall and has terracotta tiles and exposed purlins.

The windows to the south elevation are double hung sashes.

Carrington Garages
The Carrington garages are located at the rear of the hotel facing Parke Street. The seven bay building in the Federation warehouse style is built of brick with parapet wall and skillion roof. The building was constructed in two stages, firstly the four southern bays then the three northern bays. Rendered cornices mark the first floor and form a parapet frieze. The brickwork has at one time been painted.

Most of the original timber framed and sheeted garage doors which open in four panels survive. The third bay from the north has a narrower pedestrian entry.

The upper floor of the building has double hung sash windows.

Evidence survives of a single storey skillion roofed building on the north end of the garages.

Former Powerhouse
The former powerhouse is a two storey brick building in the Federation warehouse style at the rear of the hotel facing Parke Street. The parapet walls have decorative brickwork over the openings and simple cornice mouldings at the first floor level and frieze level.

The building is broken up into eight bays, each with paired double hung windows to the top floor. Six of the bays have framed and sheeted doors opening to Parke Street with windows above. The northern 5 openings have double height doors that open to the former boiler room, a double height space which housed the large boiler now removed. All openings have concrete lintels. The doors to the southernmost bay open to another double height space with a surviving weighbridge, rail lines and archaeology associated with the operation of he furnace in the northeast corner of the room. The furnace is located at the base of the chimney that is also connected to the boiler room to the north.

At the rear (eastern side) of the powerhouse is the large tapered brick chimney with a corbelled brick top. Considered to be one of the tallest freestanding chimneys in the state, and with its location near the highest point in Katoomba, the chimney can be seen from almost all directions in the area, making it a well known landmark.

Site of Clarendon
The site of the Clarendon guesthouse is marked by a levelled area immediately behind the Carrington shops at 49-57 Katoomba Street. A terrace behind the site that was the location of a tennis court is connected to the site of the Clarendon by a flight of brick steps that also lead to the Carrington gardens.

Garden Seat
A semi-circular sandstone garden seat is located at the top of the Carrington lawns on the east side of the Carrington driveway, immeadiately opposite the hotel entry. Facing the main hotel building it has a high wall and stone cornice. At the centre of the circle is a base for a statue. Bases for statues are also at the ends of the curves.

Garden Pavilions
Two octagonal garden pavilions are found to either side of the top of the driveway. Each has a roughcast rendered base then timber framing with a low pitched metal roof.

Site of the Clarendon, Archaelogical Description. The site of the Clarendon guesthouse is remarkable for its intactness. The site contains considerable surviving evidence, which illustrates its former occupation and historical connections. The outline of the building is clearly evident at ground level and the site also contains substantial building footings in sandstone and brick, retaining walls, steps and hard-paved landscape features such as former path and yard areas as well as the former tennis court. It is likely that this site may contain intact archaeological deposits associated with the construction and occupation of the early Clarendon. Subsurface elements such as water supply or other service features may also survive.

Hotel Grounds, Archaelogical Description: The documentary evidence available indicates several phases of modification of the grounds. Physical evidence of older features such as terracing/paths, site of the croquet lawn and tennis court still survives and is evident as the surface contours, especially in the area of the grounds between the front of the main hotel and Katoomba Street. There are also areas of former hard-paved surfaces. Kerb and guttering along the driveway and features such as the handsome gate posts. Blocks from a removed gate post are also extant. Landscape archaeology may also be expected to be able to clarify matters such as the precise position of now vanished plantings. In particular the palms, which are proposed for reinstatement within the current Katoomba Town Square scheme.

Garden and Grounds, Landscape Description:

The sandstone wall, probably built by Peacock in 1902, with driveway entrances at either end, forms the Carrington boundary with Katoomba Street. In good condition, it is partially obscured by bus shelters. There is a mesh security fence along the top of the wall. At the northern end of the property there are four of five c. 1911 sandstone gateposts, the innermost of which have been damaged through being hit by large delivery trucks. One post appears to have possibly been reassembled at some stage and the remains of the fifth are near the former rose garden in the SW corner of the grounds. A Harry Phillips photograph of 1915 (Silvey 1996, p. 50) shows the two outermost posts topped with statuettes bearing lights which are no longer there. The decorative wrought iron gates are also missing. No early gates or gateposts (formerly wooden) remain at the southern entrance drive.

The driveway appears to follow the 1911-13 alignment, which was altered to the north in 1912 during preparations for the building of the bank in 1913-14, although some widening has occurred at the front of the hotel. The sandstone edges and guttering are still intact, although damaged and repaired with concrete in some places. Some of the bollards are still in use, although not in their original locations. The garden beds lining the drive have been filled with agapanthus or grassed over.

Currently a small area near the northern driveway on the lower terrace is being used as a 'beer garden' for the adjacent public bar. It is an intrusive element in the 1911-13 garden layout. The ground level of the lower terrace is that established by 1911, although due to the tennis courts being reported as in the front of the hotel the levels were possibly established as early as 1890, and there is a small embankment between the levelled former tennis court area and the boundary wall. At the edge of the embankment there is clear archaeological evidence of the location of the palm trees planted along the frontage. A set of steps leads to the upper terrace. The finest trees on the lower terrace are two Deodars (Cedrus deodara) planted symmetrically in relation with the central axis of the garden during the 1960s (planting date, Beaver & Smith 2000). Trees planted close to the boundary wall, possibly to screen the bus shelters, could potentially damage the wall as they mature. At the southern end of the terrace, there is a eucalypt. The eucalypt and the trees planted close to the wall intrude on the heritage values of the garden. There is evidence in the driveway kerbing, of a path, which appears to have led from the lower terrace lawn to the side entrance of Clarendon (the main entrance after the 1924 construction of the shops on Katoomba Street).

The ground levels of the upper terrace have been modified due to the installation and later filling in of the swimming pool. Formerly there had been a central path leading to the lower terrace. The semi-circular stone scat is on the central axis at the top of the upper terrace. The sundial has been removed, leaving the pedestal base. Two lions, which stood by the scat have been removed. A large Southern Magnolia (Magnolia grandiflora) and a New Zealand Cabbage Tree (Cordyline australis) are among the older plantings on the site. Other plantings are more recent plantings and include a Silver Birch, Ornamental Cherries (Prunus serrulata) and a Deodar.

Mature specimens of Monterey Pine (Pinus radiata) and a beech (Fagus sp.) behind the gazebo near the northern boundary appear to date from the late nineteenth /early twentieth century. The edging to, and tradition of, the triangular bed are significant as part of the early garden, but the plantings within the bed are recent.

The garden to the south of the driveway contains the remnants of edging for the pathway system and circular rose garden, with a solitary rose bush. Two Bunya Bunya pines (Araucaria bidwillii), mature rhododendrons and a Southern Magnolia (Magnolia grandiflora) are in this section of the garden. The Bunya Bunya pines are landmark plantings in the local area. To the south of this section of garden is part of Clarendon, now a vacant area and Clarendon's former tennis court which was used for the Carrington after 1951 (Bates 1983, p.36).

The terrace to the immediate front of the hotel is edged with a stone balustrade, which is in need of minor repair. Immediately behind the balustrade and retaining wall are garden beds, planted under the current ownership. Because of their close proximity to the wall, some of the small trees chosen may grow to a size which could potentially cause damage to the wall.

The entire garden, apart from the terrace immediately in front of the hotel, lacks adequate maintenance and garden refuse has been allowed to accumulate over historic fabric. The current use of Cyclone mesh fencing for the boundaries is highly intrusive. Although the garden is in a degraded state, its 1911-13 layout is sufficiently intact for it to be conserved and garden beds and plantings reinstated. Although elements, e.g. gazebos and stone scat and several mature plantings, are extant from the 1920s additions, the layout and fabric of the garden primarily reflects the 1911-13 Joynton Smith garden design.
Physical condition and/or
Archaeological potential:
Generally - good
Garden Pavilions - poor
Garages and powerhouse - fair
Date condition updated:03 Mar 01
Modifications and dates: Most of the buildings have been refurbished in the 1990s.

Sandstone Wing
Three door openings converted to window openings with brick infill 1990s

Garages
Two northern bays - garage doors replaced with roller shutters 1990s

Former Powerhouse
Boiler removed c. 1990

Bathurst Road Bar
Ground floor joinery replaced late 1990s
Automatic teller machine in streetfront

Katoomba Street Bar
Ground floor joinery replaced late 1990s
Sandstone plinth rendered over and coursed in ashlar
Marble stair treads replaced with slate
Current use: Hotel
Former use: Hotel

History

Historical notes: (Note: The cardinal dates of ownership and occupancy of the Carrington given here are taken from the Land Title documents scrupulously analysed by Peter Phillips in the Conservation Management Plan of 1987. The dates conflict with many of the dates given in the published works of Bates, Armitage and the Rotary Club of Katoomba, and in most of the unpublished reports, but are, we believe, accurate and important.)

Katoomba developed initially in a way quite different fromn the other mountain townships along the western railway. John Britty North opened a coal-mine below Katoomba Falls in 1878 and acquired extensive lands to the west of the later Cascade Street as far north as the rail-line.

Trains had already started to halt at Katoomba, primarily because of the quarry called The Crushers, which produced hard sandstone ballasting for the maintenance of the track, and in 1881 a platform was constructed on the site of the present station.

The regularisation of the railway halt encouraged development nearby. George Biles’ hotel, now the Hotel Gearin, to the north of the line, was first licensed in 1881 and the Great Western Hotel south of the station was built in 1882.

The Great Western (known as the Carrington after 1886) was built on part of portion 53 in Megalong parish, a twenty-hectare (50 acre) piece of land bounded on the north by the bend of the railway on both sides of the new station and extending westwards to the boundary of North’s land at the future Cascade Street. Portion 53 was one of the grants held by James Henry Neale, who had made substantial investments in mountain land.

Neale was a master butcher and politician, who had represented East Sydney in the Legislative Assembly from 1864 to 1869 and again from 1872 to 1874, and Hartley in the intervening period, 1869 to 1872. He built a substantial residence called Froma on the south-westerly part of portion 53, the present TAFE site in Parke Street. In 1881 Neale sold the house along with the rest of portion 53 to an Ashfield entrepreneur, Frederick Clissold, who at once sub-divided it in a series of sales in 1882-3 (Hubert 2000). Clissold created the present street system of South Katoomba, with Katoomba Street passing through the middle of Neale’s portion 53 and Cascade Street forming its western perimeter. The southern part of the present Carrington site, along with Froma, was sold to the Metcalfe family, who lived in Froma until 1911. The lots immediately to the north were sold to Harry Rowell, who ran the Oxford Hotel in King Street, Sydney, in 1881-2 (Gazette 1881, III 4714; 1882, III 4741).

Although Rowell did not get legal title to the Carrington site until January 1882, he had already in September 1881 sought from John Kirkpatrick a tender for designing and building a hotel. Kirkpatrick, born in 1856, was a recent graduate from the architectural practice of the celebrated Edmund Blacket, with whom he had trained from 1873 until 1880, when Kirkpatrick was 23 years of age. His remarkable rise to prominence in his early twenties seems to have been assisted by the political influence of his father and the patronage in the mid 1880s of Sir William Lyne, secretary for public works. Kirkpatrick at the age of 24 was entrusted with the responsibility of building the hotel which led the way for Katoomba to become a premier tourist destination (Malone 1983,
611-2).

Kirkpatrick engaged as contractor F. Drewett from Lithgow, who completed the work expeditiously and the Great Western opened in 1882, with additions in 1882-3 completing a sixty-room establishment. The first liquor licence was granted to Rowell on 17 July 1883 (Gazette 1883, III 4756). Rowell’s mortgagors foreclosed in 1886 and the hotel passed first to Hunt and Thorpe and was leased to Frederick Goyder in 1887.

Goyder, with his brother, had been a successful grazier in northern New South Wales and Queensland: they converted Pirillie station back of Bourke from cattle to sheep in the early 1880s (History of Bourke XI 55). Education for the children of successful graziers meant boarding-school and Frederick Goyder came to Katoomba to inspect the new Katoomba College, opened just north of the railway station in 1884. The Goyder family approved and moved to Katoomba. Frederick became deeply involved in the commercial and political life of the town and in 1890 became the first mayor of the municipality.

Although Goyder was not yet even the lessee of the new hotel, it was he who welcomed the governor, Lord Carrington, to the Great Western in 1886 and it was he who successfully sought the governor’s permission to change the name to the Carrington. In October 1887 Goyder was given the lease of the hotel and finally purchased it in April 1888. As lessee and owner, Goyder was responsible for many garden plantings, with shrubberies and pines, and he moved the tennis court from near Bathurst Road to the Katoomba Street frontage of the main garden. (See the photographs of c.1889 and c.1890 reproduced in Low, Pictorial Memories, 1991, 37, showing the two successive locations of the tennis court.) The unexplained and undocumented stone building free-standing on the south side of the hotel, looking south to Echo Point and the Jamieson Valley, seems to have been built in Goyder’s time. The most plausible explanation for this fine but stylistically alien stone house alongside the brick hotel is that Goyder built it as his own personal family residence, just as Joynton Smith was later to have a private flat in its upper storey.

The economic problems of the 1890s affected Goyder and his hotel and the mortgagors again foreclosed in 1901, leasing the property to a group including Arthur Peacock, the manager of the Imperial Hotel at Mount Victoria. Peacock soon became sole lessee and ran the hotel for ten years. He made substantial improvements, internally to the plumbing. Externally Peacock constructed the sandstone retaining wall which remains so significant a feature of the Katoomba Street garden frontage. In 1911, however, the mortgagors sold the hotel to James Joynton Smith.

Joynton Smith was a self-made man, who shared with Mark Foy, creator of the Hydro Majestic, a passion for sport and for well-run and luxurious hotels. The son of a London gasfitter, Smith left school at the age of twelve and soon joined the P & O company as a cabin-boy, graduating to third cook in due course. He settled in New Zealand in 1874, when he was sixteen, and worked modestly in coastal shipping and in the catering industry. After an unsatisfactory first marriage, he returned alone to England in 1886 and lost his savings through gambling. He returned to Wellington and helped to found the Cooks’ and Stewards’ Union: he remained close to labour politics all his life. When Smith finally came to Sydney in 1890, he earned his keep by calligraphy, but in 1892 he moved into hotel management. With a new wife in 1893, a daughter of a New Zealand hotelier, he became outstandingly successful, converting the old Imperial Arcade Hotel in Sydney to the prosperous and up-market Arcadia in 1896. Dissatisfied with a life too exclusively metropolitan, Smith determined to invest some of his new wealth in the Blue Mountains, buying the Imperial Hotel at Mount Victoria, where Peacock had been manager, crowning this in 1911 with the purchase of the Carrington and soon afterwards leasing the Hydro Majestic from Mark Foy at Foy’s own suggestion. The Imperial and the Hydro did not make any money for Smnith but, as he remarked in his autobiography, ‘they replenished the bank of health’. It was the Carrington which brought a satisfying profit, averaging a return on capital of 8 to 10 percent throughout the 1910s and 1920s (Smith, My Life Story 1927, 216-24; Cunneen 1988, 650-1).

Smith retained the Carrington until his death in 1943 and remained a force in Katoomba, although his principal home was at Coogee Beach in Sydney. He was prominent in Sydney pony-racing, dog-racing and rugby league. He was an inactive member of the Legislative Council from 1912 until 1934 and briefly an alderman of Sydney City Council, becoming Lord Mayor in 1917-8. He became a newspaper proprietor in 1919, launching Smith’s Weekly with R.C. Packer as manager, and in 1920 establishing the Katoomba Daily, with other newspapers added to his empire up to 1939. In 1920 he was knighted and around this time he married for the third time. The Carrington’s history is often written as though the Katoomba hotel was the centre of Smith’s life: it was only an aspect of a many-faceted career of business and sporting pleasure centred in the metropolis. He seldom visited the mountains except at weekends (Smith 1927, 217).

Smith inevitably aroused opposition, not least in Katoomba. R.V. Smythe, who ran the rival newspaper The Mountaineer, fulminated in 1920 about the way in which ‘a set of Johnny-come-latelies are now practically endeavouring to take possession of the township, at the bidding of a Joss, whose only claim for consideration is the weight of his purse, and the malignancy with which he utilises its contents’ (quoted in Armitage 1998, 170).

Whatever the political aspirations of Smith and his cronies towards Katoomba Municipal Council, Smith left an indelible physical mark on the Carrington and therefore on Katoomba Street, bringing capital and determination to modernise the stately Victorian hotel created by Rowell and Goyder.

Smith commissioned the prominent local architect, Edward Hewlett Hogben, in conjunction with the architect sons of F.C. Goyder, to remodel the elegant frontage of Kirkpatrick’s iron-laced hotel with the present undulating piazza and balcony, reached by a flight of once grandiose steps and sustained by stone Doric columns recycled from the Members’ Stand at Victoria Park pony-track. This racing facility had been built by Smith himself in 1908 in the Sydney inner suburb of Zetland, off Joynton Avenue and close to the Royal South Sydney Hospital which he also founded in 1910. Presumably the five-year-old Members’ Stand was also remodelled in 1912-3 when it lost its stone columns (Painter & Waterhouse 1992, 50, 64).

The stables on Parke Street, built originally for Frederick Goyder, were remodelled as lock-up garages in 1911-2 and three extra garages were constructed to the design of Hogben, who also built around 1913 the two-storied building at 15 Katoomba Street for the City Bank (now the second Carrington bar). This building intruded on the original north carriageway from Katoomba Street to the front steps of the hotel and the present alignment, with its four out of Smith’s five gateposts, was introduced.

Finally in the flurry of change in 1911-3, the front garden was remodelled. The pine trees planted by Rowell and Goyder, which ‘had cast a sombre shade and rustled rather mournfully in the western breezes’ were removed and ‘the new clipped hedges, the smooth lawns and parterres of
flowers give a geometrical lightness and beauty to the grounds’ (Blue Mountains Echo, 7 Nov. 1913).

In keeping with his largeness of vision, Smith built his own electric power station on the Parke Street side of the Carrington in 1913. He had earlier installed his own generating equipment in Imperial Arcade in Sydney but had been forced to sell his enterprise to Sydney City Council and obliged moreover to agree not to generate power anywhere else in the city area, He had retained his generating plant, so decided to transfer it to the Mountains. He bought out the local gas company’s statutory right to supply electricity and erect power poles, built a network of distribution poles not only in Katoomba but as far as Mount Vicoria to the west and Woodford to the east, together with the railway stations, and build a large power-house on Parke Street (Smith 1927, 177-83). The towering chimney, also designed by Edward Hogben, became at once the principal landmark of the town and remains Katoomba’s iconic structure whose dominance should not be challenged. The power station supplied electricity to the upper mountains for twelve years, until the municipality of Katoomba erected its own generator north of the railway in 1925, and acquired most of Smith’s equipment, itself second-hand from Sydney in 1913. The building remains as a shell. The large boiler, manufactured by D.H. Berghouse of Ultimo and brought apparently from Smith’s Arcadia Hotel in Sydney, was not moved to the municipal power-station in 1925 but continued in use to heat the Carrington (National Trust Industrial Archaeology Committee listing sheet, 1987). Unfortunately it was removed from the building around 1990 and presumably scrapped.

In 1920 Smith acquired the Clarendon guesthouse built about 1883-4 just south of the Carrington.
The importance of the Clarendon is twofold: its early date and the undisturbed quality of the site. It was only the fourth substantial building to be erected in central Katoomba and probably the first guesthouse (followed by 150 others over the years). It was run by Mrs Simonson from 1884 until 1902. One of her daughters married John Douglass, the well-known and wholly admirable foundation schoolmaster. It remained a guesthouse for nearly forty years, until the Leslies transferred the name and goodwill of Clarendon to their newly built premises at 68 Lurline Street. They then sold the 1880s house to the next-door neighbour, Joynton Smith.

Smith intended that Clarendon should become a mountain residence for his third wife, but Lady Smith perhaps occupied the house only briefly, since five shops (numbers 49 to 57 Katoomba Street) were built in her front garden in 1924, presenting very plain rear elevations to Clarendon’s front door and verandah (Rate Books). Smith then leased Clarendon as a rooming house. It gradually deteriorated and after a fire, it was demolished in 1960. Nothing has been built over the foundations or over the tennis court beyond. The court was used by the Carrington’s guests after the court adjacent to Katoomba Street (opened in the 1880s, converted to croquet early in the 1920s, reverting to tennis by 1944) was closed around 1950 (Beaver & Smith 2000, 16-18). The site of Clarendon has unusually high archaeological potential.

In 1923 to 1927 Smith added substantially to the hotel accommodation. He removed the dormer windows and enlarged the attic bedrooms (originally for servants); he demolished the west end of Rowell’s north wing and replaced it with a new wing. A lift was installed and the dining-room was enlarged, just in time for the visit of the future George VI and the present Queen Mother in 1927.

Smith died in 1943, but the hotel remained in the family trust. In 1967-8, however, the Joynton Smith Management Trust finally sold the property to another self-made immigrant, the Greek entrepreneur, Theo Morris (who also owned the Hotel Gearin just across the railway line). The large and rambling Carrington was in need of extensive conservation and up-grading of facilities. Despite a successful, though premature, celebration in 1980 of the centenary of digging the foundations, the hotel did not enjoy the care it required and an interim conservation order was placed on the buildings and most of their historic curtilage in 1982 by the New South Wales government and made permanent in 1987. Morris sold the hotel in the late 1980s and it is now in process of renovation by the new owner, Geoffrey Leach.

In its heyday, the Carrington attracted well-known guests, British royalty, Australian prime-ministers, New South Wales premiers, actors and film stars and, even in competition with the Hydro Majestic, enjoyed through its gubernatorial cachet a certain pre-eminence among the mountain hotels.



Key Aspects in the Development of the Garden and Grounds
When the Carrington (Great Western) Hotel was built in 1882, it was sited in a prominent location facing east towards Katoomba Street. The fenced and planted grounds provided the large hotel with a suitably ample setting, their extent to the south defined by the boundary with Clarendon, the fourth building to be constructed in Katoomba Street. By 1887 the introduction of a gravel driveway lined with shrubs and flowerbeds gave the visitor a sense of arrival (Beaver and Smith 2000 p. 19) and was illustrated on the hotel's letterhead (National Archives Sydney SP32/1/Box289 Katoomba, 1887). Although changes were made after that time, an integral aspect of the grounds of the Carrington - the driveway entering the grounds from Katoomba Street and the relationship of the hotel to a street frontage - was formed. The tradition of a tennis court for the hotel was also introduced. The grounds became an important feature of the hotel during the Goyder ownership and the front of the hotel was described as being 'attractively improved and laid out into carriage drives, walks, shrubbery, ornamental trees, tennis lawn...'( Beaver & Smith 2000 p.7). The Monterey Pine (Pinus radiata) was possibly part of the 1880s planting, the Bunyas (Araucaria bidwillii) were likely planted in the 1890s (Bates 1983, p. 15, p. 12) and early in the twentieth century more of the current surviving trees were planted - the magnolias and plane tree (Beaver and Smith 2000; photographic evidence) and a large triangular-shaped bed was well established in the northern corner of the front garden.

In 1902 the Nepean Times, reported that a 'substantial retaining wall and picket fence' had replaced the old paling fence on Katoomba Street (Beaver & Smith p.7). It is unclear as to whether the sandstone retaining wall reported to be surmounted with an iron palisade in 1911 (Beaver & Smith p.7) is different from that constructed in 1902. By 1911 and almost certainly by 1890, (cf photographs, Low 1991, 37) the tennis courts had been moved to the lower terrace, implying that part of the garden layout had been established prior to the Joynton Smith ownership, which commenced in October 1911.

During 1911-13 the changes made included the alteration of the northern arm of the driveway (reported in the Blue Mountains Echo on 26 April 1912 (Beaver & Smith 2000 p.8)) and the introduction of the sandstone gates and terracing on the upper level, which established the present form of Carrington's garden setting. This period is the most crucial in understanding the layout and garden setting (reduced from its 1882 extent) for the Carrington that still exists, as the garden was an integral part of the Carrington Hotel experience, providing a venue for receptions held by a number of celebrated visitors (Beaver & Smith p. 1 0) in addition to being an area where guests indulged in both passive and active recreation. A panorama from the Carrington toward Katoomba Street (Phillips c. 1920 reproduced in Bates) shows plane trees along the Katoomba Street frontage and an axial path to the lower terrace lawn. Bollards defined the edge of the asphalt drive, protecting the edging to the garden beds and a well-formed path, which led to Clarendon, entered the shrubbery in the area of the rose garden. The development of the garden during the early years of Joynton Smith's ownership also brought Danish landscape designer Paul Sorensen to the Blue Mountains. Although Sorensen did not stay working at the Carrington for long, it was the first place he worked in NSW and it influenced his decision to stay in Australia and he became a prominent twentieth century designer of domestic gardens.

The design for the front garden appears to be fairly symmetrical, although the central axis is not quite perpendicular to the front facade of the hotel itself. This is because the northern arm of the driveway was moved slightly south in 1912 and the bank building was soon constructed in 1914 on the Katoomba Street frontage following the oblique line of the relocated driveway. (Examination of 1932 and 1996 Landsphoto aerial photography). The terracing, the driveway alignment with flowerbeds and sandstone gate pillars (one of which was removed in the 1970s) and sandstone walling from this period have remained. Structural additions within the established layout during the 1920s added a level of sophistication to the garden - gazebos, a pergola covered carriageway, a semi- circular stone seat and sundial, the introduction of garden beds beside the axial path and the construction of a trellis over the steps. The lower terrace appears to have been formed with more care than the upper terrace due to its function as a tennis lawn, a croquet lawn and later again, tennis. Some changes in planting occurred, the most prominent was the replacement of the plane trees with (Washingtonia filifera) palms. These were planted slightly back from the retaining wall and picket fence, allowing a grass pathway and hedge between the row and the fence (site inspection February 2001) and were in place until the 1960s. From 1914 to 1947 the gardener at the Carrington was Samuel Timmings (Beaver and Smith p. 11). This implies a consistency in horticultural practices and maintenance.

A photograph taken during the 1940s (Beaver and Smith p.28) when the tennis court was in place on the lower terrace lawn and the Katoomba Street frontage was hedged indicates that views to the Carrington were partially blocked on the lower levels, the dominant element being the massing of the upper storeys of the hotel and Carrington's chimney stack, a landmark in the local area. Both the hedge and tennis court had been removed by 1951 when Carrington's lower lawn terrace was used as a vantage point for viewing the re-enactment of Blaxland, Lawson and Wentworth. The tennis court used at the time was likely the court behind Clarendon. The date of the construction of the Clarendon court is unknown but it was there by the 1930s (Aerial photo).

During the later years of the twentieth century elements such as the pergola, trellis and some garden beds were removed and a swimming pool (since filled in) added to the upper terrace. New trees were planted, some, e.g. the deodar cedars, were placed with respect for the symmetrical nature of the 1911-13 design and others planted seemingly at random. From the 1960s onwards there was a gradual erosion in the level of maintenance on the garden resulting in a loss of detail. The introduction of bus shelters on Katoomba Street in front of the early twentieth-century stone wall of the Carrington Hotel has obscured and detracted from traditional views to the place.

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings (none)-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Transport-Activities associated with the moving of people and goods from one place to another, and systems for the provision of such movements (none)-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation (none)-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups (none)-

Assessment of significance

SHR Criteria a)
[Historical significance]
The Carrington has high state significance as the establishment which, more than any other, created Katoomba as a pre-eminent tourist destination. It was a quintessential high Victorian grand hotel, remodelled to suit the expectations of an Edwardian generation. The highly visible chimney-stack, the highest structure in Katoomba, is significant as a symbol of a major and early private enterprise in electricity generation, supplying power to an entire urban community as well as the hotel. The owners of the hotel, in particular the local businessman and politician, Goyder, and the more cosmopolitan Smith, have added to its historical significance, attracting, in their different ways, newsworthy clientele, just as the celebrated governor who lent his name to the hotel gave a special cachet to the establishment.

In its long heyday under Smith, the Carrington earned significance for the glamour, wealth, political influence and number of its guests, which attracted reactions fromn the community. The reputation of the grand hotel has remained potent throughout the state as well as in Sydney and the Mountains. The public bars, first on Bathurst Road and more recently in the old bank building, have local social significance in the shadow of the more exclusive hotel.

The remaining former power-house and its towering chimney are rare surviving evidence of an early electricity plant for a rural town.

The garden and grounds of the Carrington have importance as an integral component of a renowned grand Victorian hotel of state significance. The early introduction, in the 1880s, of a tennis court as a component of the grounds demonstrates the evolving role of recreation in nineteenth-century resorts.

The overall layout, sandstone walling and gateposts, terracing, remnant garden edging and bollards, established by 1911-13 and retaining aspects of the earlier garden, including from the 1890s and early 1900s plantings of Araucaria bidwillii, Pinus radiata, a Magnolia grandiflora, the plane and beech trees, with additional elements - gazebos, the stone seat and rose garden - added by the 1920s, are of historical importance as surviving elements of a garden associated with a grand hotel with an early twentieth-century setting which is intact.

The Carrington is a rare surviving Victorian resort hotel that has retained its setting overlooking a large forecourt. It is a rare example of a Victorian resort hotel in a town setting, with an early twentieth-century garden layout in which design elements survive to an unusual degree.

The Carrington’s gardens are representative of a very small group of large tourist hotels, especially those within mountain retreat areas, which have maintained their associated gardens. The Hydro Majestic at Medlow Baths, and Jenolan Caves House are other examples among the few remaining hotels whose gardens were designed to function as resort gardens from their inception.
SHR Criteria c)
[Aesthetic significance]
The Carrington Hotel is a fine extant example of a Victorian Italianate style resort hotel with Edwardian remodelling that retains its setting through the retention of the generous forecourt. The overlays of art nouveau style leadlight glass add an unusual dimension to the architecture.

The location of the Carrington at virtually the highest point in Katoomba and the sweeping approach drives and lawns and prominent mature plantings have made the hotel an important landmark in the town from the time it was built.

The chimney of the Carrington, considered to be one of the highest freestanding chimneys in the state, makes it a landmark from all directions in the town.

The garages and former powerhouse facing Parke Street provide a strong semi-industrial element to the streetscape near the edges of the town centre.

The garden and grounds have an aesthetic significance on a local level for their landmark mature plantings, especially the Bunya Bunya pines (Araucaria bidwillii) and chimney stack, sandstone walling and gates on Katoomba Street.

The gardens and grounds have also an aesthetic signficance for the contribution they make to the Katoomba street-scape.
SHR Criteria d)
[Social significance]
The three persons with which the Carrington is especially associated are Lord Carrington, a distinguished governor of New South Wales who consented to having the hotel renamed after him in 1886; Frederick Goyder, a former grazier become a local businessman and politician, who played the leading role in the successful establishment of the hotel and its garden in the late Victorian period; and Sir James Joynton Smith, a self-made man, hotelier, newspaper-owner and sportsman, who gave the frontage of the hotel and its gardens their present form in the years just before World War I. Carrington and Smith are of state significance, Goyder of considerable local significance.

The hotel is also significant as an early and fine example of the work of the architect John Kirkpatrick who went on to design the Commonwealth Bank in Pitt Street and Martin Place, Sydney, and the Royal Hotel at Randwick. Kirkpatrick’s Italianate design for the Carrington is clearly discernible despite the twentieth-century alterations.

The Carrington garden also has an association with the career of the prominent landscape designer Paul Sorensen, since it was the first place at which he worked in New South Wales: without this taste of the Blue Mountains, it is likely that Sorensen would have left Austrsalia and never created the gardens in the Blue Mountains and elsewhere in New South Wales for which he is celebrated. Sorensen is designer of state significance.

The social significance of the Carrington in its long heyday under Smith was state-wide, because of the glamour, wealth, political influence and number of its guests, which attracted reactions from the community and the media.n its long heyday under Smith, the Carrington earned significance for the glamour, wealth, political influence and number of its guests, which attracted reactions from the community. The reputation of the grand hotel has remained potent throughout the state as well as in Sydney and the Mountains. The public bars, first on Bathurst Road and more recently in the old bank building, have local social significance in the shadow of the more exclusive hotel.

The garden and grounds have a social significance on a local level for public appreciation of their landmark mature plantings, especially the Bunya Bunya pines (Araucaria bidwillii) and chimney stack, sandstone walling and gates on Katoomba Street.

The gardens and grounds have also a social signficance for the contribution they make to community appreciation of the Katoomba street-scape.

The grounds of the Carrington, particularly the forecourt to Katoomba Street, have significance to the local community as a place for gathering to mark special community events such as the re-enactment in 1951 of the first crossing of the Blue Mountains in 1813.

The reputation of the grand hotel has remained potent throughout the state as well as in Sydney and the Mountains. The public bars, first on Bathurst Road and more recently in the old bank building, have local social significance in the shadow of the more exclusive hotel.

The garden and grounds have a social significance on a local level for public appreciation of their landmark mature plantings, especially the Bunya Bunya pines (Araucaria bidwillii) and chimney stack, sandstone walling and gates on Katoomba Street.

The gardens and grounds have also a social signficance for the contribution they make to community appreciation of the Katoomba street-scape.

The grounds of the Carrington, particularly the forecourt to Katoomba Street, have significance to the local community as a place for gathering to mark special community events such as the re-enactment in 1951 of the first crossing of the Blue Mountains in 1813.

The power-house chimney which dominates the streetscape is of significance both to local people and to visitors as a civic symbol of Katoomba
SHR Criteria e)
[Research potential]
Hotel Buildings

In addition to their historic, architectural and aesthetic qualities, the substantial buildings of the Carrington Hotel complex are also significant for their archaeological potential. Although no detailed assessment of archaeological resources has been completed, the 1987 Conservation Plan includes some use of visible physical evidence in determining the sequencing and phasing of the early stages of the complex. Where deposits have not been removed by subsequent disturbance or misadventure (building works, repairs, etc) they may be expected to yield infomation relevant to the original construction and occupation of the building. Areas within the building which are likely to have archaeological potential include under floor and foundation areas, wall cavities and roof spaces.

Hotel Grounds

The documentary evidence available indicates several phases of modification of the grounds. Physical evidence of older features such as terracing/paths, site of the croquet lawn and tennis court still survives and is evident as the surface contours, especially in the area of the grounds between the front of the main hotel and Katoomba Street - There am also areas of former hard-paved surfaces. Kerb and guttering along the driveway and features such as the handsome gate posts. Blocks from a removed gate post are also extant. Landscape archaeology may also be expected to be able to clarify matters such as the precise position of now vanished plantings. In particular the palms, which are proposed for reinstatement within the current Katoomba Town Square scheme.

Site of the Clarendon

The site of the Clarendon guesthouse is remarkable for its intactness. The site contains considerable surviving evidence, which illustrates its former occupation and historical connections. The outline of the building is clearly evident at ground level and the site also contains substantial building footings in sandstone and brick, retaining walls, steps and hard-paved landscape features such as former path and yard areas as well as the former tennis court. It is likely that this site may contain intact archaeological deposits associated with the construction and occupation of the early Clarendon. Subsurface elements such as water supply or other service features may also survive. As an archaeological site in the context of Katoomba this site is remarkable for its ability to demonstrate. Although a number of archaeological sites have been scheduled in prior heritage studies, the site of the Clarendon is one of the very few easy to interpret, comprehensible and accessible sites.

Overall

The Carrington Hotel site is significant for its archaelogical potential in relation to the history of recreation and tourism which have played such a key role in the development of Katoomba and the Blue Mountains.
Assessment criteria: Items are assessed against the PDF State Heritage Register (SHR) Criteria to determine the level of significance. Refer to the Listings below for the level of statutory protection.

Recommended management:

Conserve the Carrington Hotel and its setting including its east garden and approach drives, the stone retaining wall and gates to Katoomba Street and evidence of its former tennis and croquet lawn. Ensure maintenance is returned to a level commensurate with the importance of the garden. Remove intrusive elements in the grounds. Reinstate plantings based on documentary, photographic and archaelogical evidence. Prepare an LEP which controls development which might otherwise impact on the landmark qualities of the Carrington Hotel, garages, former power station and chimney. Maintain the Carrington as a landmark in the Katoomba area, conserving views of the hotel and the former powerhouse chimney from all directions. Do not allow new buildings in the town centre or elsewhere in Katoomba that reduce the landmark qualities of the Carrington Hotel. The eaves line of buildings on adjacent sites should not be higher than the parapets of the former power station. The overall height of buildings on adjacent sites should not be higher than the main part of the Carrington Hotel (relative to the ground level of the individual sites). Reconstruct the widow's walk as a promenade and viewing platform. Retain garages facing Parke Street including original surviving doors. Remove latex paint from stone balustrade to hotel terrace. Beaver & Smith 2000 have recommended that the garden be restored to a state which reflects its design in 1927. However due to the removal of a number of elements, In its current state it more closely resembles the 1911-13 layout and it may be more appropriate to reconstruct the garden to that period while retaining the slightly later elements -the stone seat, gazebos, sundial base and rose garden along with later plantings which complement the early layout. Re-route all service and delivery vehicles to enter the property from Parke Street. The current mode of delivery to the front of the hotel via the main driveway is damaging the significant fabric of the sandstone gates and impacting on the driveway edges. In addition it seems an inappropriate way of servicing a 'grand' hotel. Relocate bus shelters from their current intrusive position in front of the Carrington Hotel sandstone wall. The Katoomba Town Square Master Plan requires the alteration of significant fabric - the sandstone walling on Katoomba Street and the ground level of the lower terrace and the formalisation of the current use of the terrace area as a beer garden. Cotton Palms are also proposed to be planted but not in their former positions. Since these proposals have an inappropriate adverse effect on the heritage values of the lower terrace area, they are not recommended.

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Local Environmental PlanLEP2005K03207 Oct 05 122 
Heritage study K032   

Study details

TitleYearNumberAuthorInspected byGuidelines used
Blue Mountains Heritage Study1983K032Croft & Associates Pty Ltd & Meredith Walker  Yes
Heritage Study Review, Blue Mountains1992K032Tropman and Tropman  Yes
Heritage Review Katoomba Leura2001K032Jack, Hubert, Morris, LavelleRIJ, PH, CM, SL Yes
Technical Audit BM Heritage Register2008K032Blue Mountains City CouncilCity Planning Branch No

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
Map 1881Subdivision Plan, Katoomba, 30 April
Map  Parish Map, Megalong Parish, County Cook
Written 1936Obituary of Edward Hewlett Hogben in Katoomba Daily, 6 March
Written 1890NSW Government Gazzette, 1881-
WrittenA. M. Armitage1998The Katoomba-Leura Story
WrittenBourke Historical Society History of Bourke, XI
WrittenC. Cunneen1988'Smith, Sir James John Joynton (1858-1943)' in Australian Dictionary of Biography, XI
WrittenD. Beaver and J. Smith2000Carrington Hotel, Katoomba: Conservation Management Plan for Gardens and Grounds
WrittenG. Bates1983The Carrington Hotel, Katoomba, NSW
WrittenG. Bates1983The Carrington Hotel, Katoomba, NSW
WrittenG. Bates1980Centenary of the Carrington Hotel, 1880-1980
WrittenGwen Silvey1996Happy Days: Blue Mountains Guesthouses Remembered
WrittenJohn Low1991Pictorial Memories: Blue Mountains
WrittenJoynton Smith1927My Life Story
WrittenM. Painter and R. Waterhouse1992The Principal Club: A History of the Australian Jockey Club
WrittenNational Trust Industrial Archaeology Committee1987Listing Card for Carrington Power House
WrittenO and P. Phillips1987Conservation Plan for the Carrington Hotel, Katoomba
PhotographO. and P. Phillips1987Conservation Plan for the Carrington Hotel, Katoomba
WrittenP. Hubert2000Katoomba TAFE (East), Parke Street, Katoomba: Heritage Assessment
PhotographRotary Club of Katoomba1982Old Leura and Katoomba
WrittenRotary Club of Katoomba1982Old Leura and Katoomba
WrittenS. Malone1983'Kirkpatrick, John (1856-1923)' in Australian Dictionary of Biography, IX

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

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Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Local Government
Database number: 1170391


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