Weatherboard Cottage [Item 181] | NSW Environment, Energy and Science

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Heritage

Weatherboard Cottage [Item 181]

Item details

Name of item: Weatherboard Cottage [Item 181]
Other name/s: Coo-ee
Type of item: Built
Group/Collection: Residential buildings (private)
Category: Cottage
Primary address: 39 Waratah Street, Croydon Park, NSW 2133
Parish: Concord
County: Cumberland
Local govt. area: Burwood
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
39 Waratah StreetCroydon ParkBurwoodConcordCumberlandPrimary Address

Statement of significance:

No. 39 Waratah Street, Croydon Park has historic and aesthetic significance as an excellent example of a single storeyed rare c. 1900 – 1910 weatherboard Federation cottage. The building retains its original form, character and detailing including an asymmetrical front facade, timber weatherboards, steep pitched corrugated steel hipped roof, projecting bay with roughcast sheeting, battens and decorative bargeboard. Windows are timber frame casement with small coloured glass panels and highlights and a bracketed timber sun hood with very detailed timber valence. There is a separate bull nose corrugated steel verandah supported on timber posts with decorative timber balustrade, brackets and frieze on a raised timber floor. The building makes a positive contribution to the Waratah Street streetscape.
Date significance updated: 18 Jun 14
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Physical description: A single storey c.1900 -1910 weatherboard Federation cottage with steep pitched corrugated steel hipped roof with brick chimney. The front facade is asymmetrical and constructed of timber weatherboards. It features a projecting bay with roughcast sheeting, battens and decorative bargeboard. Windows are timber frame casement with small coloured glass panels and highlights and a bracketed timber sun hood with very detailed timber valence. There is a separate bull nose corrugated steel verandah supported on timber posts with decorative timber balustrade, brackets and frieze on a raised timber floor. The timber entry door has a metal security screen.

There is a brick paved path and concrete steps up to the verandah. A timber picket fence is on the street boundary. There is a medium sized front garden with lawn, trees and plants.

Modifications
The original roof and fence has been replaced. A security door has been added.

History

Historical notes: Land granted to William Faithful in c.1808 covers what is now Enfield and much of Croydon Park. The land was later owned by Simeon Lord, one of Sydney's wealthiest merchants, and in c.1824, by W.H. Moore, who cleared much of the heavily timbered area for farming.

The earliest commercial activity in the area was the lumber trade. Thomas Hyndes, a prosperous merchant, had timber getters and millers working the land of the Cooks River valley as early as c.1809. By the mid 1840’s, wood cutters, gardeners, innkeepers, storekeepers and blacksmiths were forming the nucleus of the Enfield village. Hyndes financed the building of a schoolhouse and St Thomas’ Church, opening in 1847 and 1848 respectively.

The Cooks River valley remained a rural district in c.1890’s with two vineyards, various market gardens and nurseries, and a poultry farm. The Enfield district featured numerous brick yards and a stream brick factory. Rupert Cook’s Brickworks operated on land alongside Mitchell Street, now part of Henley Park. The Enfield Tramway is important in the area’s history and development, established in c.1891 as a steam operation, but electrified and expanded in c.1912.

By the 1920’s the area was predominately working class with construction of modest cottages on small allotments by speculative builders. During the 1930’s depression, the government made funds available for improvements to the Municipality, including the construction of the Enfield Olympic Pool, which opened in c.1933.

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Suburban Expansion-

Assessment of significance

SHR Criteria a)
[Historical significance]
The site and building is of local historical significance as part of an early subdivision and Federation period of development in the local area constructed in c.1900 – 1910.
SHR Criteria c)
[Aesthetic significance]
The building is of local aesthetic significance as a good intact example of a single storey c. 1900 – 1910 weatherboard Federation cottage. The building retains its original form, character and detailing including an asymmetrical front facade, timber weatherboards, steep pitched corrugated steel hipped roof, projecting bay with roughcast sheeting, battens and decorative bargeboard. Windows are timber frame casement with small coloured glass panels and highlights and a bracketed timber sun hood with very detailed timber valence. There is a separate bull nose corrugated steel verandah supported on timber posts with decorative timber balustrade, brackets and frieze on a raised timber floor.
SHR Criteria f)
[Rarity]
The building is rare in the local area.
SHR Criteria g)
[Representativeness]
The building is an excellent representative example of a single storey weatherboard Federation cottage constructed in c. 1900 – 1910.
Assessment criteria: Items are assessed against the PDF State Heritage Register (SHR) Criteria to determine the level of significance. Refer to the Listings below for the level of statutory protection.

Recommended management:

[a] Architectural detailing and decorative elements of the building should be conserved. [b] The form, scale and character of the building, together with its curtilage and streetscape presentation should be maintained. [c] No new openings i.e. windows and doors should be made to the front facade of the building. [d] Any future additions should be generally confined to the rear of the building and should be subordinate to the principal building form. [e] The major garden elements should be retained including significant trees or specimen plantings, retaining walls, stairs etc. [f] The garden setting of the front yard and side setbacks should be retained.

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Local Environmental PlanBurwood LEP 2012i18109 Nov 12   
Local Environmental PlanWeatherboard Cottage001921 Jul 89 844570
Heritage study     

Study details

TitleYearNumberAuthorInspected byGuidelines used
Burwood Heritage study19863.34Fox & Associates Architects/Planners Sydney  No

References, internet links & images

None

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

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Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Local Government
Database number: 1250271


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