Bona Vista Complex | NSW Environment, Energy and Science

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Bona Vista Complex

Item details

Name of item: Bona Vista Complex
Type of item: Complex / Group
Group/Collection: Farming and Grazing
Category: Homestead Complex
Primary address: 11 Amelia Street, Pitt Town, NSW 2756
Parish: Pitt Town
County: Cumberland
Local govt. area: Hawkesbury
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
11 Amelia StreetPitt TownHawkesburyPitt TownCumberlandPrimary Address
Johnston StreetPitt TownHawkesbury  Alternate Address

Statement of significance:

Bona Vista is of high historical significance as a substantial Victorian farm group which survives with its slab outbuildings. It is highly evocative of the nineteenth century character of the higher lands around Pitt Town which were often used for orcharding.

The main homestead of Bona Vista is an important Victorian filigree residence. It is probably the most substantial homestead in the immediate Pitt Town area and is a well built residence featuring a broad ogee roofed verandah, fine slate roofing and sandstone walls.

The surviving corn shed is important for its unusual construction, unique in Australia to the Hawkesbury region.

The slab barns are all representative examples of the slab barns which characterise the Pitt Town area.
Date significance updated: 01 Jan 02
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Physical description: Bona Vista is possibly the most important farm group in the Pitt Town area. It comprises a substantial homestead set well back from the street five slab sheds to the rear (south) and west of the homestead. Citrus trees are to the northwest of the homestead. The homestead itself has a garden of mature trees.
Some timber post and rail fencing survives on the Johnston Street boundary. Similar fencing survives on Bootles Lane boundary.

Homestead
The homestead is a substantial late Victorian sandstone building with a main block facing north and a kitchen wing on the western end of the rear side. The main wing has a hipped slate roof with lead flashings. It has an ogee roofed verandah to the north east and south supported on cast iron posts and has a cast iron valance. There are three sandstone chimneys with moulded corbels and tall glazed pots.

The kitchen block is hip roofed with corrugated steel roofing. It has a single chimney with an arched cowl.

The house has double hung windows with timber shutters.


Slab Barn A
Slab Barn A is located to the southeast, well away from the residence. It is a large single storey barn with a gabled roof on an east-west axis. The roof extends its north side and it has a skillion on the west side.


Corn Shed (Slab Barn B)
The corn shed located to the north of Slab Barn A. It is a rare example of a horizontal log structure designed to allow good ventilation for the drying of corn. This type of building is believed to be unique to the Hawkesbury region of Australia where only a few examples survive. It has a gabled roof on a north-south axis, with weatherboard cladding to the gable ends.


Stables (Slab Barn C)
The stables are a single storey slab building located immeadiately southwest of Slab Barn A. It is a gabled building on an east-west axis with splayed weatherboard cladding to the gable ends. The structure has been adapted to be used for the storage of farm machinery but does retain evidence of its use as stables


Slab Barn D
Slab Barn D is a gabled barn on a north-south axis to the south of the main house. It has a skillion on the south end.


Slab Barn E
Slab Barn E is a single storey gabled barn southeast of the main house (between the house and the corn shed). It has a gabled roof on an east-west axis. The roof has been extended on both the north and south sides to provide additional storage. A modern machinery shed has been added to its west end.
Physical condition and/or
Archaeological potential:
Condition: House - good; Slab sheds - fair
Archaeological Potential: High
Date condition updated:28 Aug 09
Current use: House, barns and farm
Former use: House, barns and farm

History

Historical notes: While the lower floodplain of Pitt Town Bottoms was used primarily for cropping, the higher lands north of the township of Pitt Town was more commonly used in the nineteenth century for orcharding. Bona Vista is a reflection of this.

The homestead at Bona Vista was built for J. Johnston in 1889 using sandstone from the quarry at Long Neck Lagoon. (Barkley) Its fine Victorian house indicates the prosperity of its owner and the large number of barns indicate the productivity of the farm.

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture (none)-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. (none)-

Assessment of significance

SHR Criteria a)
[Historical significance]
Bona Vista is of high historical significance as a substantial Victorian farm group which survives with its slab outbuildings.
SHR Criteria c)
[Aesthetic significance]
This farm group with its substantial curtilage and surviving outbuildings is highly evocative of the nineteenth century character of the higher lands around Pitt Town which were often used for orcharding.

The main homestead of Bona Vista is an important Victorian filigree residence. It is probably the most substantial homestead in the immediate Pitt Town area and is a well built residence featuring a broad ogee roofed verandah, fine slate roofing and sandstone walls.
SHR Criteria e)
[Research potential]
The surviving corn shed is important for its unusual construction, unique in Australia to the Hawkesbury region.
SHR Criteria f)
[Rarity]
This group has high value as a rare surviving farm group with a large number of intact barns.

The surviving corn shed is important for its unusual construction, unique in Australia to the Hawkesbury region.
SHR Criteria g)
[Representativeness]
The main house is a fine example of the Victorian filigree style.

The slab barns are all representative examples of the slab barns which characterise the Pitt Town area.
Integrity/Intactness: High
Assessment criteria: Items are assessed against the PDF State Heritage Register (SHR) Criteria to determine the level of significance. Refer to the Listings below for the level of statutory protection.

Recommended management:

Retain group with substantial curtilage including remnant fencing and orchards to reflect the importance of this substantial farm group.

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Local Environmental Plan"Bona Vista" house and slab barns and a curtilage286   

Study details

TitleYearNumberAuthorInspected byGuidelines used
Hawkesbury Heritage Review2001286Hubert Architects, Heritage Futures and Terry Kass in AssociationPH Yes
Heritage Study of the Shire of Hawkesbury1987153Lester Tropman & Associates, Helen Proudfoot & Meredith Walker  No
Heritage Study of the North Western Sector of Sydney1984H/PT-25Howard Tanner & Associates in association with Max Kelly and Elizabeth Vines  No
Pitt Town Slab Barns Study199110Graham Edds & Associates  No

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
WrittenBarkley, Jan2001Oral Information on Pitt Town Heritage Items - Longneck Lagoon Quarry

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

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(Click on thumbnail for full size image and image details)

Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Local Government
Database number: 1740011


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