House, "Camden" | NSW Environment, Energy and Science

Culture and heritage

Heritage

House, "Camden"

Item details

Name of item: House, "Camden"
Type of item: Built
Group/Collection: Residential buildings (private)
Category: House
Primary address: 2 Boyle Street, Balgowlah, NSW 2093
Local govt. area: Manly
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
2 Boyle StreetBalgowlahManly  Primary Address

Statement of significance:

The house at 2 Boyle Street Balgowlah is of significance for the local area for historical, aesthetic and associative reasons, as a fine representative example of Federation Queen Anne style on a large scale, and as a rare example of this style on such large scale in the local area. The house, built c. 1910, is readily identifiable as part of the historic building stock of the local area that demonstrates architectural tastes and practices of highest quality building 100 years ago. The house makes a major contribution to the streetscape and area character, particularly in Boyle Street. The house is strongly associated with A S Knight, prominent engineer and businessman who built it and whose ventures ultimately led to the initial land subdivision of the immediate locality. The house has a number of notable architectural features and elements which, combined with its unique setting, make it a rare as well as representative example of its style and date of construction.


Manly Council is in the process of updating the inventory sheets for places listed as Items of Environmental Heritage on the Manly Local Environment Plan (2013) as amended.
The information in this inventory entry may not be complete.
For further information, please contact Manly Council’s Heritage Advisor.
Date significance updated: 30 Mar 11
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Construction years: 1907-1910
Physical description: A two storey brick Federation Queen Anne style residence with sandstone foundations, oriel windows and bay windows, timber framed casement windows and slate gabled roof. Sandstone arch over entry at side. Sandstone fence with wrought iron gates. Original entrance at present No. 2b right-of -way. Other significant elements include: tuck pointed brick work; timber and stone verandah; Art Nouveau style leadlight; original brick paving to western (Boyle St) entrance; stone (rock-faced) fence; turned timber columns and balustrading; bay window (first floor balcony); monumental arched entrance (stone); octagonal tower above bay with coloured glass and leadlight double front doors (to right-of-way) with highly decorative leadlight; semi-circular head to door - also glazed with leadlight; rock-faced stone foundations; stone lintels over and stone spandrils beneath many windows.
Physical condition and/or
Archaeological potential:
Site has been subdivided.
Date condition updated:30 Mar 00
Current use: Residence
Former use: Residence

History

Historical notes: Buildings of Historical and Architectural Interest (1976) stated:
"This very large house is a typical Federation-style house with a Queen Anne influence. It was built in 1907... The architect is reputed to have been a Mr Grey.
"For many years the house was known as The Lookout because from the tower and adjoining balcony there was a fine view out through the Heads, and until the surrounding flat development obscured the house, The Lookout was quite a landmark."
Dr Terry Metherell notes (2004):
The history of The Lookout (now Camden, 2 Boyle Street, Balgowlah) and Willyama Avenue are inextricably linked.
A S Knight, a mining engineer who built The Lookout, was also the owner, with O Van Rieben of the Barrier Miner newspaper at Broken Hill. (Sands Directory 1910: Broken Hill, Commercial). Knight reputedly made his fortune from the Broken Hill silver and lead mines in the early 1900s.
In December 1908, Knight "of [the] Barrier Miner" was described in a real estate brochure for the nearby North Harbour Estate, auctioned by Richardson and Wrench, as "erecting a large residence opposite to the Estate at considerable cost." Indeed, the North Harbour Estate included nine lots fronting Boyle Street, opposite Knight’s new Federation mansion The Lookout. The Lookout when completed enjoyed panoramic views over North Harbour, and the main Harbour out through the Heads. As Richardson and Wrench’s wordsmiths intoned: "There is no place in the Commonwealth with the prospect of Manly as a health resort. It has, in fact, everything that nature could bestow upon it." The pure air and lovely surroundings combine to make North Harbour a charming locality.
However, Knight was to enjoy his isolated splendour only briefly. When first listed in Sands’ 1910, The Lookout’s estate stretched along most of Boyle Street, south of Sydney Road, through to Hill Street and what became Rosedale Avenue. By 1912, Knight was in financial difficulty, perhaps in part due to the extravagance of his new mansion, complete with horse and carriage, gatekeeper’s cottage (now 8A Boyle Street) and the required servants to maintain house, estate and lifestyle. On 12 October 1912, Manly agents and auctioneers Robey, Hanson and Strong offered for sale The Lookout estate subdivided into 15 lots, including the house (Lot 1). To facilitate the subdivision, a new street was created off Lauderdale Avenue, between Boyle Street and Rosedale Avenue, named Willyama Avenue.
Willyama Avenue was named after "Willyama", the original name for the locality in which Broken Hill developed (Aboriginal word meaning "youth"?). Willyama was the official name for the new silver-lead mining field in the vicinity of today’s Broken Hill. The Willyama lode may have made A S Knight’s fortune at The Barrier but it could not save it. However, there was little interest in The Lookout subdivision, distant as it was from Manly Wharf and even the new Manly-to-Spit tramway. This permitted Knight to remain in his mansion until around 1917, when his new address was listed as Kissing Point Road, Dundas (see Sands’ 1910-1918). Knight died in 1934, and his holdings in Manly were offered for sale in April 1936; they included corner lots in Radio Avenue, The Plaza tea-rooms and guest-house on South Steyne, and Yandilla Flats in Wentworth Street.
Willyama Avenue’s houses, and those that followed later in the 1920s appear to have been built in the popular Arts and Crafts style. All were large bungalows, built on Willyama Lane where the land was terraced and most with extensive landscaped gardens falling down the cliff toward Willyama and Lauderdale Avenues. Several had their own tennis courts, one of which remains today.
Manly Council’s Register of Subdivisions, p19, no 468, 23 September 1927 listed applicant P S Nott & Son applying on behalf of owner H H Rayward to subdivided Lot 1/2 ‘Lookout Estate’, Boyle Street. The application was approved by Council on 28 September 1927.
Meanwhile, The Lookout in Boyle Street was sold to Henry H Rayward. His wife, Mrs H Rayward is shown as the householder in Sands’ 1926, before it was leased to the Misses Davis for use as Fairlight Private Hospital (Sands’ 1928). H H Rayward returned from 1930 (Sands’ 1930-1932/33), finally selling the steadily deteriorating house to the Reverend C H Palmer who moved his Camden Grammar School there in early 1943. Rayward died the following year (SMH 07/09/1944).
Camden Grammar School had occupied Dalley’s Castle in Manly until forced out by its demolition for new flats in 1939. After a brief sojourn in another historic house at Pennant Hills, Camden Grammar returned to the Manly area, where the Palmers already owned property in Boyle Street. The house was renamed Camden, its present name, after the school. The Palmers gradually sold off more of the remaining land around the original house to keep the struggling school afloat. In the 1950s, an unsightly block of flats was built between Camden and Lauderdale Avenue, taking most of its vista over North Harbour and to the Heads. In the 1960s another block of units was built on the school’s tennis courts and the adjacent house facing Willyama Avenue.
In September 2004, the original gatehouse of The Lookout at 8A Boyle Street was sold, after many years as an untidy series of flatettes or rooms to let.
In 2010 ‘The Coach House’ at 8 Boyle Street, the original sandstone coach-house for The Lookout, dating from circa 1908, was offered for sale at auction by Richardson and Wrench (Manly Daily 08/05/2010, Real Estate).

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. (none)-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages (none)-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. (none)-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. (none)-

Assessment of significance

SHR Criteria a)
[Historical significance]
The house, built c. 1910, is readily identifiable as part of the historical building stock of the local area and demonstrates architectural tastes and practices of highest quality building 100 years ago.
SHR Criteria b)
[Associative significance]
The house is strongly associated with A S Knight, prominent engineer and businessman who built it and whose ventures ultimately led to the initial land subdivision of the immediate locality.
SHR Criteria c)
[Aesthetic significance]
The house at 2 Boyle Street Balgowlah has notable aesthetic qualities on local area level and makes a major contribution to the streetscape and area character, particularly in Boyle Street.
SHR Criteria f)
[Rarity]
The house at 2 Boyle Street Balgowlah is a fine representative example of Federation Queen Anne style on a large scale. The house has a number of notable architectural features and elements which, combined with its unique setting, make it a rare as well as representative example of its style and date of construction.
SHR Criteria g)
[Representativeness]
The house at 2 Boyle Street Balgowlah is a locally rare example of Federation Queen Anne style on a relatively large scale for an individual residence. The house has a number of notable architectural features and elements which, combined with its unique setting, make it a rare as well as representative example of its style and date of construction.
Integrity/Intactness: Presents as generally intact when viewed from publicly accessible areas.
Assessment criteria: Items are assessed against the PDF State Heritage Register (SHR) Criteria to determine the level of significance. Refer to the Listings below for the level of statutory protection.

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Local Environmental PlanHouse, "Camden"I605 Apr 13   

Study details

TitleYearNumberAuthorInspected byGuidelines used
Manly Heritage Study1986 Blackmore, Ashton, and Co.  No
Review and Database Listing1999 C. Kemp/ W. McArthur  Yes

References, internet links & images

None

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

rez rez
(Click on thumbnail for full size image and image details)

Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Local Government
Database number: 2020367


Every effort has been made to ensure that information contained in the State Heritage Inventory is correct. If you find any errors or omissions please send your comments to the Database Manager.

All information and pictures on this page are the copyright of the Heritage Division or respective copyright owners.