St Anne’s Ryde Anglican Church and Cemetery | NSW Environment, Energy and Science

About us

St Anne’s Ryde Anglican Church and Cemetery

Item details

Name of item: St Anne’s Ryde Anglican Church and Cemetery
Other name/s: Saint Anne's Church and Cemetery, St Anne's Ryde Anglican Church
Type of item: Built
Group/Collection: Religion
Category: Church
Primary address: 46 Church Street, Ryde, NSW 2112
Parish: Hunters Hill
County: Cumberland
Local govt. area: Ryde
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
46 Church StreetRydeRydeHunters HillCumberlandPrimary Address

Statement of significance:

St Anne’s Church and Cemetery, developed from 1826, are of historical significance as a centre of community religious activity and associated life events in the Ryde district since 1826. The church is also of historical significance for the history of religious education in Sydney as it contains (as the nave) the former chapel/schoolhouse which began as the only school in the district in 1827 and operated on the site till 1838. The first burial in the cemetery dates from 1826 and the cemetery continued in use till 1916. St. Anne’s Church and Cemetery have historical association with the establishment of the original Kissing Point/Ryde township and the naming of the place as Ryde. The church and cemetery have historical association with important local 19th century settlers and events in the Ryde district, many commemorated in monuments or memorials in the church and cemetery.
St Anne’s Church and Cemetery are of aesthetic significance as a landmark church and cemetery on a prominent hill, part of a precinct of small-scale 19th century buildings. The church is of aesthetic significance and also rare as a Victorian Free Gothic style building, its divergence from the Victorian Academic Gothic style reflecting its growth from an initial 1826 stone chapel/schoolhouse (now the nave), extended in 1861-62 with a sandstone 4-level tower at the western end and chancel and vestry at the eastern end. The church and cemetery have technical significance as evidence of the 19th century stonemasonry, the cemetery containing some particularly notable and unusual individual monuments.. The church and cemetery are rare at a State level as an early burial ground surrounding a church. The church and cemetery have social significance as the site of community life events such as marriages, christenings and funerals. The Church has social significance for the local Anglican community. The cemetery has research significance as an early burial ground which demonstrates and evokes 19th century values and beliefs. The site also has archaeological potential.
Date significance updated: 19 Dec 12
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Designer/Maker: Arthur Blacket 1891 Organ Chamber
Builder/Maker: Frank Wilson stonemason 1861-62 tower, chancel and vestry
Construction years: 1826-1862
Physical description: SITE: Situated on a prominent site bounded by Church Street, Victoria Road, Little Church Street and 42 Church Street ( the site of the 2002 Ryde Anglican Centre ) , St Annes Church with its surrounding cemetery or burial ground has many of the characteristics of a typical English village church. The vegetation and dark foliage of the perimeter trees serves to enhance the church and reduce the visual intrusion and noise of Victoria Road. The cemetery of St Annes Church, Ryde comprises two sections, one north and one south of the historic church. The Church and cemetery contain many historic memorials to pioneers who have played an important part in the life of the district and the church.

The sandstone kerb in Church Street reinforces the 19th century character of the streetscape and is an important feature of the landscape, not only to St Annes Church, but its continuation along both sides of Church Street assists in stitching together an important group of 19th century buildings, including St Annes, the Courthouse and Ryde Wesley Uniting Church.

CHURCH: The sandstone church is centrally located on the site in with its long axis approximately east-west, and its tower at the western end. The castellated tower has four levels, gothic-arched door and window openings, and clock faces on three sides. The main body of the church features sandstone buttresses, a gabled slate roof and gothic-arched stained glass windows.

The original building, a simple rectangular sandstone structure, forms the nave of St Anne's Church today. The 1861-1862 chancel, gallery and vestry are to the east of the nave, stepped back south of the north-east corner of the nave. The 1861-62 sandstone tower is to the west of the nave. The porch at the ground floor level of the tower is the main entry point to the church.

- The Nave is the main body of the church where the congregation sits. (1826)
- The Sanctuary is that part of the Chancel containing the Holy Table bounded by a communion rail where the parishioners kneel for Communion (1861-1862)
- The Chancel is the eastern part of the church beyond the Pulpit. (1861-1862)

CEMETERY: The cemetery surrounds the church. Among important burial monuments in the cemetery and the church are those of:
- Rev William Henry who preached the first Sermon in the district. (Grave on the north east of the church).
- Rev George Weaver Turner and his wife, Mary, who came from Ryde on the Isle of Wight and is thought were mainly responsible for the name of Ryde being adopted. (Grave on south west side of church near the driveway. Also a memorial on the nave wall).
- James Squire Farnell, one time Premier of NSW and largely responsible for building of the old Gladesville Bridge and the Iron Cove Bridge. (Grave on north east of church).
- Major Edward Darvall The eastern Good Shepherd window is in his memory and also of his daughter, Mrs. Annie Tully. He built "Ryedale" which became St Columb's Rectory at West Ryde (Graves on north side of church).
- William Forster, one time premier of NSW (Wall Plaque). He was the son of Thomas and Eliza Forster. Eliza was the daughter of Gregory BlaxIand. (Stained glass window memorial)
- The Terry Windows in the church are in memory of the Terry children who died in a diphtheria epidemic when very young. They were buried at St Anne's.
- Richard Rouse Terry (plaque memorial) built Denistone House, which became part of Ryde Hospital. Edward Terry extended Eastwood House and was the first Mayor of Ryde. The Brass Lectern is in memory of Richard Terry's eldest daughter, Mrs. Florence Muller.
- Lady Eleanor Parkes, the second wife of St Henry Parkes is buried on the north eastern side of the cemetery
- Emma Oxley was the wife of the explorer, John Oxley. (Grave on south side of the church).
- Maria Ann Smith "Granny Smith' of apple fame. Buried at St Anne's with her husband, Thomas, her headstone is on the south east side of the church.
- The Popes (Graves on north side of the church), came from the Isle of Wight in 1838. George ran the Ryde Store and became Postmaster in 1850. His son, George Miller Pope, was a churchwarden and trustee for many years. He built the Court House in the 1860s. He married Isabella, daughter of Paul Benson. There is a stained glass window in the Chancel.
- The Smalls: John Small and Mary (nee Parker) arrived in the first Fleet. Their descendants are buried on the south east side of the church.
- The Bartons: There are memorial plaques to Robert and Emily (third daughter of Major Edward Darvall and his first wife Emily) in the Chancel. They and their daughter, Rose Isabella, were buried at St Anne's on the north side. Rose Isabella was mother of Andrew Barton Paterson, better known as "Banjo" Paterson, the Australian poet.
- Paul and Charlotte Benson There is a window commemorating their golden wedding anniversary in the side chapel. Charlotte (nee Wicks) was the grand-daughter of James Weavers and Mary Porter (nee Hutchinson). The Benson grave is on the south east side and the Porter grave on the north east side of the church.
- James DevIin There is a memorial plaque in his memory on the wall of the nave. He built "Willandra" at the corner of Victoria Road and DevIin Street now the home of the Ryde Art Society and the Ryde Historical Society. He was a churchwarden and married Suzannah, daughter of Matthew and Mary (nee Small) Hughes.
- Percy G Chatfield. A memorial plaque in the nave commemorates his memory. He was a churchwarden for many years and was also Mayor of Ryde.
- Robert G Moon Organist and Choirmaster 1911 to 1941. A memorial plaque in the nave commemorates his memory.
- Maud Goodwin The cedar Hymn Board was given in memory of Maude (nee Benson), who married Percy Goodwin. Their eldest son, Clive, was Archdeacon of Sydney and in 1964 was the first Chairman of the Board of Management of the Anglican Retirement Villages.
- Henry and Elizabeth Bond There is a stained glass window in their memory near the entrance to the church. Elizabeth was a daughter of James and Ann Shepherd and a sister of Ann who married Rev William Henry.
- George Cobham Watson a former Warden and Trustee of St Anne's. The Watsons were related to the Squires who were early pioneers and owners of Ryde ' s first brewery.
Physical condition and/or
Archaeological potential:
Church: Good
Cemetery: monuments in a variable state of repair
Date condition updated:08 Dec 11
Modifications and dates: Church:
1826-1827;: Original sandstone chapel/schoolhouse built
1861-1862: sandstone tower, chancel and vestry constructed, original 1826 chapel/schoolhouse converted to a nave
1875-1876: The bell and clock were installed in the tower.
1879: a number of memorial windows were added to the church
1890-1891: The present organ installed in a special Organ chamber designed by architect Arthur Blacket next to the Chancel. It was moved to the Gallery in 1983.
Late 19th century: the pulpit, reading desk, the present cedar pews and the stained glass windows were installed in the church.
1944: The Chime Carillon installed in St Anne's.
1954: The War Memorial Vestries were built from the stone of the 1874 Schoolhouse.
1966: The first sound system was installed at St Annes.
1978: The Tower Clock was electrified
1983: The church was altered internally by repositioning the organ in the Gallery which was rebuilt and extended; renewing and lowering the floor of the nave to same on level; moving the Holy Table to the Centre of the Chancel and replacing the cedar Prayer Desk with two small ones. A new sound system was installed replacing the one installed in 1967. Extra vestry accommodation was built.

Cemetery:
First burial 1826;
Final burial 1916.
1952: Road widening of Victoria Road has cut off a portion of the southern section of the cemetery. At the time of the road widening, many headstones were removed to the Field of Mars Cemetery. An index to the names on 27 headstones removed to Field of Mars Cemetery is available at www.stannes.org.au. A list of all inscriptions for St Annes Cemetery is available at austcemindex.com
Over time many headstones and footstones have disappeared or were moved. In recent years, some headstone conservation has taken place.
Further information: Arthur Blacket's design of the organ chamber in 1891, and the design detail of the 1861-1862:construction of the church tower, chancel and vestry, gives rise to the suspicion that the 1860s work may have been designed by architect Edmund Blacket, however no documentary proof of this survives.
Current use: Church
Former use: Church

History

Historical notes: AREA HISTORY
Aboriginal people inhabited the Sydney basin for thousands of years prior to the arrival of Europeans. The northern coastal area of Sydney was home to the Guringai people, western Sydney was home to the Dharug clans, and southern Sydney was inhabited by the Dharawal clans. The Guringai lived primarily along the foreshores of the harbour, and fished and hunted in the waters and hinterlands of the area. All clans harvested food from their surrounding bush. Self-sufficient and harmonious, they had no need to travel far from their lands, since the resources around them were so abundant, and trade with other tribal groups was well established. The British arrival in 1788 had a dramatic impact on all of the Sydney clans. Food resources were quickly diminished by the invaders, who had little understanding of the local environment. As a result, the Aboriginal people throughout the Sydney Basin were soon close to starvation. The Sydney clans fought back against the invaders, but the introduction of diseases from Europe and Asia, most notably smallpox, destroyed over half the population. The clearing of land for settlements and farms displaced local tribes and reduced the availability of natural food resources, leaving Aboriginal people reliant on white food and clothing. The French surgeon and pharmacist Rene Primavere Lesson, who visited Sydney in 1824, wrote: "the tribes today are reduced to fragments scattered all around Port Jackson, on the land where their ancestors lived and which they do not wish to leave." (Information taken from City of Ryde Aboriginal Site Management Report, Aboriginal Heritage Office, 2011).

In the early years of European settlement of Sydney, the Ryde area was found to be highly suitable for farming and orchards, and early colonial land grants to marines were given to encourage agriculture. In January 1792 land in the area which extended from Dundas to the Lane Cove River along the northern bank of the river, was granted to eight marines. The area was named by Governor Phillip the “Field of Mars”, Mars being the ancient Roman God of war, named to reflect the military associations of the land grantees. Two of these land grants were made in the modern area of the suburb of Ryde. Isaac Archer and John Colethread each received 80 acres of land on the site of the present Ryde-Parramatta Golf Links (now in West Ryde).

These grants were followed soon after by grants to ten emancipated convicts in February 1792, the land being further to the east of the marine’s grants, in the area now central to Ryde. Most of the grants were small, from 30 to 100 acres. This area was called Eastern Farms or the Eastern Boundary. By 1794 the name Eastern Farms had given way to Kissing Point, a name believed to have originated from the way in which heavily laden boats passing up the Parramatta River bumped or ‘kissed’ the rocky outcrop which extends into the river at today’s Kissing Point. Further grants were issued in 1794 and 1795, gradually occupying most of the foreshores between Meadowbank and Gladesville. Some of the grants were at North Brush, north of the Field of Mars settlement, in the area of Brush Farm and Eastwood.

Much later these were bought by John Macarthur, Gregory Blaxland and the Reverend Samuel Marsden. The district remained an important orcharding area throughout the 19th century.

The land on which Ryde House (now Willandra) was built was part of the emancipist John Small's 1794 grant and was acquired by James Devlin in 1828 from Thomas Small, James' step-father. James Devlin (1808-1875) was born in NSW, the son of Irish exile Arthur Devlin and his colonial-born wife Priscilla Squire. Devlin was originally a wheelwright, and later became a successful developer and contractor. James Devlin was a warden of St Anne's Church, Ryde and also a trustee for many years, and a Trustee of the Field of Mars Common, Devlin was instrumental in advocating for the proclamation of Ryde as a municipality and was one of the first Ryde aldermen in 1871. Devlin's Creek and Devlin Street are named after James Devlin. (Pollen, 1996).

About 1840 the name Ryde began to be used in the locality, with Devlin's 1841 subdivision being the earliest documented use of this name. Megan Martin has shown that the names Ryde and Turner Street were both chosen by James Devlin to honour the new Anglican Minister, Rev. George Turner, whose wife was a native of the English Ryde. Devlin and his neighbour, James Shepherd, had some 40 lots surveyed in a subdivision they named the Village of Ryde, with Devlin's 'East Ryde' facing St. Anne's Church and Shepherd's 'West Ryde' facing the road to Parramatta.

Devlin designed and began building the house now known as "Willandra" in 1841 on the old Small's farm and the Devlin family moved into the house in 1845. At that time it was called Ryde House.

ITEM HISTORY
St. Anne's Church Ryde contains within its fabric an Anglican Chapel Schoolhouse completed in 1827.
In 1826 Rev John Espy Keane became chaplain at Kissing Point. John Small exchanged 15 acres (formerly William Jones' grant) for 15 acres of the Church and School Corporation land together with a payment of twenty pounds and a house to be erected for John Small on his new land. This enabled the Chapel Schoolhouse to be built (the third in the district) which is the Nave of St Anne's today. It was a rectangular sandstone building with a pitched roof covered with timber shingles, arched windows with three glass panels, a belfry and a gallery with a vestry underneath. It was opened in 1827 and was known as the schoolhouse at Field of Mars and also the Kissing Point Schoolhouse. When a later schoolhouse was completed in 1838 and classes transferred to it, the chapel/schoolhouse at Kissing Point was then named St Ann, spelt without an "e", until the 1870s when an "e" was added.

Archdeacon Thomas Hobbes Scott had decided that a new chapel was needed at Kissing Point and work was begun in October 1826. By July 1827 it was in use. The brief was to erect at Kissing Point some decent place for the celebration of Divine Service which would at the present answer as a schoolhouse and at a future period be convertible into a "Country Church".

In 1826-1827 the construction of St Anne's Anglican Chapel Schoolhouse on a ridge overlooking the Parramatta River gave the district a new landmark which provided the settlement with a public identity as a separate and distinct place. In 1828 the then minister of St Anne's, the Reverend Charles Wilton, put forward a case for the construction of a network of roads and river crossings which would centre on the church. Although Wilton's particular proposal was not adopted, nevertheless by 1832 the intersection of the principal roads through the district ran very close to St Anne's.

As early as 1822 locals were agitating for a Cemetery: a petition that year stated that people experienced much inconvenience in moving the deceased to Sydney or Parramatta for interment. This resulted in the Anglican Church allowing burials around the new Chapel Schoolhouse at Kissing Point. The first burial, of Anthony Bryan, took place on 16 September 1826, five weeks before building commenced on the Chapel Schoolhouse. Over the next 90 years, burials included prominent pioneers of the area: Rev. George Turner and his wife, James Farnell first native born premier of NSW, Edward Terry, Ryde's first Mayor, members of the Blaxland family, Major Edward Darvall, Lady Eleanor Parkes and Mana Ann Smith (Granny Smith). The final burial took place in the cemetery in 1916.

St Annes was an important church and manylocally famous people were parishioners. This includes Mana Ann Smith (Granny Smith), Lady Parkes, second wife of Sir Henry Parkes, who lived in Ryde, the grandmother of Banjo Paterson, the published poet Emily Mary Barton (nee Darvall), Emma Oxley, wife of the explorer John Oxley, James Devlin (of Ryde house, later named Williandra), John Le Gay Brereton, physician and author; and various members of the Blaxland, Bowden, Darvall, Farnell , Manning, Shepherd, Small, and Terry families.

Turner Street, created by Devlin's 1841 subdivision, was named in honour of St Anne's Rev. George E.W. Turner (1810-1869), rector of St Anne's 1839-1869. Announcing the sale in the Sydney Herald, the auctioneer Thomas Stubbs advised prospective buyers that they would be delighted by the sight of the pretty little church on a Sunday when "the whole village meet together, with their best faces, and in their cleanliest habits, to hear their duties explained to them by their good pastor, the Rev Mr Turner". Other advantages were "an excellent school for the education of children", "a police establishment for the protection of property" and "Mr Manning's beautiful steam boats" which went by four times a day on the Parramatta River. Bidders at the 1841 auction were reminded that land was a desirable capital investment, even in difficult times. Buyers were offered free access to whatever building materials they might need from Devlin's land adjoining the subdivision. This included stone, loam, brick-earth, water and wood to burn bricks. Apparently Stubbs had no inkling of the severity of the economic depression that was about to engulf the colony. Nor did his bidders. All 17 lots of Devlin's "East Ryde" subdivision were sold. All 23 lots of Shepherd's "West Ryde" subdivision were likewise sold.

By the 1840s the church was found to be too small for the growing population, however it took till 1861 for extensions to the church to commence. In 1861-1862 sandstone additions were made to St Anne's being the Tower, Chancel and small Vestry at the side of the chancel. On 14th September 1870 the church and cemetery were both consecrated by Bishop Barker. In 1875-1876 the bell and clock were installed in the church tower. In 1890-1891 the present organ, purchased from St Paul's Burwood, was installed in the special organ chamber constructed next to the chancel designed by architect Arthur Blacket. It was moved to the gallery in 1983.

During the last years of the 19th Century the pulpit, reading desk, the present cedar pews and the stained glass windows were installed in the church. The reredos is in memory of Mary Britten, wife of Rev H H Britten, rector from 1877 to 1905. In 1921 the holy table of red cedar was installed in memory of John and Ellen Blaxland of The Hermitage (John was the son of explorer and settler Gregory BlaxIand of Brush Farm).

In 1944 the chime carillon was installed in St Anne's. This was designed by Dr J Ernest Benson, a churchwarden at St Anne's. In 1952 Victoria Road was widened and the cemetery reduced in size as a result, at its southern end. At least 27 headstones were relocated to the Field of Mars Cemetery. In 1954 The War Memorial Vestries were built from the stone of the 1874 schoolhouse. In 1966 the first sound system was installed at St Annes. In 1969 the Archbold Building, adjoining the old Post Office in Church Street, was built. It was named after Mr K A P (Tony) Archbold, a previous churchwarden and Treasurer at St Anne's. In 1970 Kirkby Garden Units were built on the site of the second rectory in Church Street. They were named after a former Rector, Rev S J Kirkby, who founded the Bush Church Aid Society and was later Bishop Co-adjutor. In 1978 the Tower Clock was electrified and the front clock face was in use for the first time in living memory.

In 1983 the church was altered internally by repositioning the organ in the gallery which was rebuilt and extended; renewing and lowering the floor of the nave to same on level; moving the holy table to the centre of the chancel and replacing the cedar prayer desk with two small ones. A new sound system was installed replacing the one installed in 1967. Extra vestry accommodation was built.

In 2002 the Ryde Anglican Centre was opened on the adjoining site at 42 Church Street.

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Acquisition of private lands for public purposes-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Developing towns in response to topography-
6. Educating-Educating Education-Activities associated with teaching and learning by children and adults, formally and informally. (none)-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Architectural styles and periods - Victorian-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Religion-Activities associated with particular systems of faith and worship provision of religious education-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Religion-Activities associated with particular systems of faith and worship Community Development-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Birth and Death-Activities associated with the initial stages of human life and the bearing of children, and with the final stages of human life and disposal of the dead. Cemeteries-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Birth and Death-Activities associated with the initial stages of human life and the bearing of children, and with the final stages of human life and disposal of the dead. Monuments-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with prominent local persons-

Assessment of significance

SHR Criteria a)
[Historical significance]
St Anne’s Church and Cemetery, developed from 1826, are of historical significance as a centre of community religious activity and associated life events in the Ryde district since 1826. The church is also of historical significance for the history of religious education in Sydney as it contains (as the nave) the former chapel/schoolhouse which began as the only school in the district in 1827 and operated on the site till 1838. The first burial in the cemetery dates from 1826 and the cemetery continued in use till 1916.
SHR Criteria b)
[Associative significance]
St. Anne’s Church and Cemetery have historical association with the establishment of the original Kissing Point/Ryde township and the naming of the place as Ryde. The church and cemetery have historical association with important local 19th century settlers and events in the Ryde district, many commemorated in monuments or memorials in the church and cemetery.
SHR Criteria c)
[Aesthetic significance]
St Anne’s Church and Cemetery are of aesthetic significance as a landmark church and cemetery on a prominent hill, part of a precinct of small-scale 19th century buildings. The church is of aesthetic significance as a Victorian Free Gothic style building, its divergence from the Victorian Academic Gothic style reflecting its growth from an initial 1826 stone chapel/schoolhouse (now the nave), extended in 1861-62 with a sandstone 4-level tower at the western end and chancel and vestry at the eastern end. The church and cemetery have technical significance as evidence of the 19th century stonemasonry. The Cemetery contains some particularly notable and unusual individual monuments, and monuments with important genealogical information. .
SHR Criteria d)
[Social significance]
The church and cemetery have social significance as the site of community life events such as marriages, christenings and funerals. The Church has social significance for the local Anglican community.
SHR Criteria e)
[Research potential]
The cemetery has research significance as an early burial ground which demonstrates and evokes 19th century values and beliefs. The site also has archaeological potential.
SHR Criteria f)
[Rarity]
The church is rare as an 1860s Victorian Free Gothic style church, based around an early (1826) stone chapel/schoolhouse. The church and cemetery are rare at a State level as an early burial ground surrounding a church. Other examples of early 19th century Anglican churches in the Sydney region within early 19th century Anglican burial grounds are: St. Johns, Ashfield; St. Peters, Cooks River; St. Thomas', Enfield; and St Thomas', Mulgoa.
Integrity/Intactness: Both church and cemetery have developed over time since 1826.
Assessment criteria: Items are assessed against the PDF State Heritage Register (SHR) Criteria to determine the level of significance. Refer to the Listings below for the level of statutory protection.

Recommended management:

DOCUMENTATION: A Conservation Management Plan should be prepared for the church, and the 1991 St Anne's Anglican Churchyard, Ryde: Conservation Management Plan (CMP) prepared by Godden Mackay (see references) should be reviewed and updated prior to any major work. A Heritage Assessment is required to accompany any development application. Conservation Management Plans should be reviewed every 5-10 years. APPROACHES TO MANAGING THE HERITAGE SIGNIFICANCE OF THE PROPERTY: The cemetery in particular has degraded over time with the loss of monuments. The church community should be encouraged to apply for appropriate State heritage grants to undertake conservation work to the cemetery. The overall form of the church should be retained and conserved and preferably continue as a place of worship. All remaining intact and significant exterior fabric and the setting should be retained. St Anne's Cemetery should be managed primarily as an historic site and open space/passive recreation resource for the members of St Anne's Parish, the relatives of the deceased,and the people of Ryde Municipality. The overall plan of the cemetery should be retained and conserved and preferably continue in use as a cemetery. Consideration may be given to the construction of a columbarium but this should only occur as part of an overall landscape master plan.and with preparation of a updated CMP. All remaining intact fabric in the cemetery should be retained and conserved and the landscape setting should be maintained. Future work to either the church or cemetery should attempt to recover significance, informed by an updated CMP. Any future development should preserve the existing significant form and external surfaces and materials of both the building and monuments. Significant door and window openings should not be enlarged or closed in. The exterior stone of the church should remain unpainted and uncoated. Painted finishes should be painted in appropriate colours. OPPORTUNITIES FOR CHANGE: Very limited scope for development exists within the site due to the extent of the cemetery and the need to retain views and vistas to and from the church. However, there is some possibility for construction of columbarium within the cemetery, however detailed advice would be required via an updated CMP.

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Local Environmental PlanRyde Local Environmental Plan 201031   
Local Environmental PlanRyde Local Environmental Plan 201030   
Local Environmental PlanRyde Draft Local Environmental Plan 2011I30   
Local Environmental PlanRyde Local Environmental Plan 20143002 Sep 14   
Local Environmental Plan - LapsedLocal Environmental Plan No. 105 17 Jan 03 14 
Heritage study     

Study details

TitleYearNumberAuthorInspected byGuidelines used
Ryde Heritage Study198849Jonathan Falk Planning Consutants P/L Assoc with Rodney Jensen and Assoc P/L  No
Ryde Heritage Study1988 Jonathan Falk Planning Consutants P/L Assoc with Rodney Jensen and Assoc P/L  No
Ryde SHI Review Stage 12012 Paul Davies Pty Ltd  Yes

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
Written  National Trust Register listing forms for St Anne's Church, Ryde and St. Anne's Cemetery, Ryde
WrittenAngela Phippen2008Ryde suburb history, Dictionary of Sydney online
WrittenGodden Mackay Pty Ltd1991St Anne's Anglican Churchyard, Ryde: Conservation and Management Plan
WrittenMavis K Benson & J. Ernest Benson1992The Church on the Hill: A history of St Anne's Anglican Church, Ryde, NSW
Writtenwww.stannes.org.au2011St. Anne's Anglican Church Ryde website

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

rez rez rez rez rez rez
rez rez rez rez rez rez
rez rez rez rez rez
(Click on thumbnail for full size image and image details)

Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Local Government
Database number: 2340030


Every effort has been made to ensure that information contained in the State Heritage Inventory is correct. If you find any errors or omissions please send your comments to the Database Manager.

All information and pictures on this page are the copyright of the Heritage Division or respective copyright owners.