Terrace Group Including Interiors and Front Fencing | NSW Environment, Energy and Science

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Heritage

Terrace Group Including Interiors and Front Fencing

Item details

Name of item: Terrace Group Including Interiors and Front Fencing
Type of item: Complex / Group
Group/Collection: Residential buildings (private)
Category: Terrace
Primary address: 176-182 Glebe Point Road, Glebe, NSW 2037
Parish: Alexandria
County: Cumberland
Local govt. area: Sydney
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
176-182 Glebe Point RoadGlebeSydneyAlexandriaCumberlandPrimary Address

Statement of significance:

The site and building provides evidence of the 1900 subdivision and residental development of the Ben Ledi Estate.The building has historical significance for its ability to evidence Victorian speculative development.The building has historical associative significance for its association with J Taylor. A fine example of a traditional Victorian/Federation terrace in a Victorian streetscape that is part of a group which contributes to the streetscape. It is an important building in the professional work of the noted developer J Taylor. This building made a key contribution to the creation of the Glebe Point Road as a major town planning initiative.
Date significance updated: 19 Jul 06
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Builder/Maker: J. Taylor
Construction years: 1902-1904
Physical description: A two-storey attached terrace that is part of a group that dates from the Victorian period within the key period of significance, set on a narrow site that has retained its context.The building is setback from the street. The site has an appropriate front fence of iron palisade on a stone plinth approximately 1.5 metres high. The front gardens are small and informally landscaped and feature offset stone steps with glazed tile rises and provides and appropriate setting for the house.The façade presents a simple elevation and is constructed of rendered masonry with a scribed finish. The roof is gabled with a steep pitch. The roof is clad in slate (178,180) and concrete (176, 182) tiles and features corbelled chimneys and glazed terracotta chimney pots. No.'s 178 and 180 retain their original chimney pots. The veranda runs across the facade and has a bell cast profile. It is clad in slate and concrete tile and features cast iron fringe and balistrade incised render to fin. The façade features fluted entablature and label moulds. The front door is offset and has a security screen. Fenestration comprises vertically proportioned French doors with highlights and double hung timber windows. Number 176 does not have shutters.The building appears to be in good condition and is highly intact. Alterations include roof tiles and chimney pots at 176 and 182. Cast iron fringe is lost at 176 and 178.
Further information: Heritage Inventory sheets are often not comprehensive, and should be regarded as a general guide only. Inventory sheets are based on information available, and often do not include the social history of sites and buildings. Inventory sheets are constantly updated by the City as further information becomes available. An inventory sheet with little information may simply indicate that there has been no building work done to the item recently: it does not mean that items are not significant. Further research is always recommended as part of preparation of development proposals for heritage items, and is necessary in preparation of Heritage Impact Assessments and Conservation Management Plans, so that the significance of heritage items can be fully assessed prior to submitting development applications.
Current use: Residential
Former use: Residential

History

Historical notes: The "Eora people" was the name given to the coastal Aborigines around Sydney. Central Sydney is therefore often referred to as "Eora Country". Within the City of Sydney local government area, the traditional owners are the Cadigal and Wangal bands of the Eora. There is no written record of the name of the language spoken and currently there are debates as whether the coastal peoples spoke a separate language "Eora" or whether this was actually a dialect of the Dharug language. Remnant bushland in places like Blackwattle Bay retain elements of traditional plant, bird and animal life, including fish and rock oysters.

With the invasion of the Sydney region, the Cadigal and Wangal people were decimated but there are descendants still living in Sydney today. All cities include many immigrants in their population. Aboriginal people from across the state have been attracted to suburbs such as Pyrmont, Balmain, Rozelle, Glebe and Redfern since the 1930s. Changes in government legislation in the 1960s provided freedom of movement enabling more Aboriginal people to choose to live in Sydney.

(Information sourced from Anita Heiss, "Aboriginal People and Place", Barani: Indigenous History of Sydney City http://www.cityofsydney.nsw.gov.au/barani )

The Sydney Glebe lands were granted to the Church of England in 1789, and in 1828 "to relieve the pressing needs of clergy", Glebe was subdivided into 28 allotments and all but three lots (numbers 7,8 and 28) were offered for sale. Lot 25 was bid for by AK Mackenzie but not purchased until 1830 by FW Unwin.An area adjacent to the Hereford House Estate was that portion originally owned by Alex McKenzie, then FW Unwin who subdivided in 1829/30 into 5 blocks. J.W. Wood, T. Wolley, H.B. Bradley, D. Jones and F. Korff. A further subdivision occurred in July 1841 and was known as the Hereford Allotments, the land being cut up into 54’ x 100’ allotments. A description of the situation of these allotments is given in an advertisement of 4 July, 1841 S.M.H.;"...opposite the highly cultivated gardens and extensive pleasure gardens of Dr. Bowman peculiarised by a junction with the property of Hereford House and grounds commanding a beautiful peep of Sydney and located in the midst of a cluster of highly respectable residences and tastefully laid out villas . The Road leads to properties of G. Allen, E.D. O’Reilly, Betts, Younger, Foss Esq. and other consequential neighbours. Excellent pump for general use - reserved passage has been kept. Society and neighbourhood of first respectability and stamp. Pleasant walk to town., and more particularly agreeable and pleasant from being that side of Sydney where the pedestrian is not inconvenienced by the Brickfielders, much to the annoyance of newly arrived persons, who are always anxious to avoid the whirlwind of dust prevalent in other situations. A resident in this quarter is particularly recommended to those gentlemen just commencing the honourable occupation of a merchant - to individuals in office - to persons of moderate income and respectable tradesmen - not inferior to Woolloomooloo for a quiet retirement after business hours and a delightful spot for rural recreation and good society. The soil has been improved by successive cropping." A plan dated 1845 of the area indicates "Swiss Cottages" on the corner of Glebe Point Road and Pyrmont Bridge Road. Mr O’Reilly’s residence as indicated on the 1845 map was placed on a lot of land at what now is the corner of Hereford Street and Glebe Point Road. A brief description of its extent is given in the Sydney Morning Herald of 1847 as follows: "A detached cottage, 5 rooms, outhouses, servants rooms, etc. with upwards 5 acres grounds in cultivation with fruit trees of all descriptions. A plentiful supply of water." Among the later development in the precinct was the Rosebank Estate Subdivision 1899, with lots fronting Rosebank Street and Glebe Point Road, the Benledi Subdivision along Hereford Street and Glebe Point Road, for Auction sale 1900, and Gibson’s Subdivision of 1904 lots fronting James Avenue and Hereford Street.

The group of eight terraced houses at 168-182 Glebe Road were built for for J Taylor on the 1900 submission of the Ben Ledi Estate. 178 Glebe Point Road was first listed in the Sands Directory of 1902 and occupied by Mark Golomb. The building was then known as ‘Hilton’. 168-176 Glebe Point Road was first listed in the Sands Directory of 1903 and was occupied by EM West, Mrs Marie L Sutton, L Loydstrom, Charles McDermott, City Agent AMP and Guy Scott / James Bennett. The buildings was then known as ‘Derwent’, ‘Tamar’, ‘Huon’, ‘Esk’ and ‘Tinturn’. 180 and 182 Glebe Point Road was first listed in the Sands Directory of 1904 and occupied by William J Carr and Mrs Emma Boyd. The building was then known as ‘Hillcrest’ (180 Glebe Point Road), and ‘Leander’ (182 Glebe Point Road).

According to Bernard Smith, they "are of special interest. Built at a time when the Federation style was in the ascendant, the party wall had little influence here except, perhaps, in the decision to integrate the balcony and main roof. One aspect of the late Italianate terrace featured here is the strong visual accent given to the garden walls by vigorous curves". A sign of the changing times is the crocket ridge-capping of Marseilles tiles, and the party walls of the first and third houses which have been terminated abruptly at the junction of the balcony awning and main roof line evidence, perhaps, of a style that was losing its hold and ceasing to be understood.

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Residential-

Assessment of significance

SHR Criteria a)
[Historical significance]
The site and building provides evidence of the 1900 subdivision and residental development of the Ben Ledi Estate.The building has historical significance for its ability to evidence Victorian speculative development.
SHR Criteria b)
[Associative significance]
The building has historical associative significance for its association with J Taylor.
SHR Criteria c)
[Aesthetic significance]
A fine example of a traditional Victorian/Federation terrace in a Victorian streetscape that is part of a group which contributes to the streetscape. It is an important building in the professional work of the noted developer J Taylor. This building made a key contribution to the creation of the Glebe Point Road as a major town planning initiative.
SHR Criteria e)
[Research potential]
The site has medium archaeological potential as a turn of the century building.
SHR Criteria g)
[Representativeness]
A representative example of a Victorian period terrace in a Victorian streetscape that is part of a group which contributes to the streetscape.
Integrity/Intactness: High
Assessment criteria: Items are assessed against the PDF State Heritage Register (SHR) Criteria to determine the level of significance. Refer to the Listings below for the level of statutory protection.

Recommended management:

The building should be included in the Heritage Schedule of the LEP and be protected by the Conservation Area Listing. The terrace should be retained and conserved. A Heritage Assessment and Heritage Impact Statement, or a Conservation Management Plan, should be prepared for the building prior to any major works being undertaken. There shall be no vertical additions to the building and no alterations to the façade of the building other than to reinstate original features. The principal room layout and planning configuration as well as significant internal original features including ceilings, cornices, joinery, flooring and fireplaces should be retained and conserved. Any additions and alterations should be confined to the rear in areas of less significance, should not be visibly prominent and shall be in accordance with the relevant planning controls. Subdivision should not occur. Consolidation of sites should not occur. The existing use of the site should continue. Any existing skylights should be removed from the front facade. Any alterations to the terraces should involve a process of restoration and reinstatement of original missing elements. Removal of infilled balconies is recommended. Undertake maintenance and repair works where required. Maintain all original elements. Roofing at 182 and 176 should be replaced in order to maintain consistency. Slate and terracotta ridge capping at front pane is desirable. Replace fringe to No.'s 178 and 176.

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Local Environmental PlanSydney LEP 2012I73414 Dec 12   
Heritage study     

Study details

TitleYearNumberAuthorInspected byGuidelines used
Statement of Heritage Significance & Statement of Heritage Impact2019 Nigel Parsons & Associates Architects  No

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
WrittenAnita Heiss Aboriginal People and Place, Barani: Indigenous History of Sydney City
WrittenBerchervaise & Associates1991Main Street Study
WrittenSmith, Bernard and Kate1989The Architectural Character of Glebe, Sydney,

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

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Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Local Government
Database number: 2420099


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