House "Boomerang" including interior and garden | NSW Environment, Energy and Science

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House "Boomerang" including interior and garden

Item details

Name of item: House "Boomerang" including interior and garden
Type of item: Built
Group/Collection: Residential buildings (private)
Category: Mansion
Primary address: 42 Billyard Avenue, Elizabeth Bay, NSW 2011
Parish: Alexandria
County: Cumberland
Local govt. area: Sydney
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
42 Billyard AvenueElizabeth BaySydneyAlexandriaCumberlandPrimary Address
36 BillyardElizabeth BaySydney  Alternate Address
42 Ithaca RoadElizabeth BaySydney  Alternate Address

Statement of significance:

One of the most opulent Spanish Mission style houses in Australia (Apperly, Irving & Reynolds, 1989, Boomerang has historic, aesthetic and social significance as an exemplary example of large scale Spanish Mission/ Hollywood Spanish mansion and garden in an urban setting, in relatively intact condition, demonstrating the lifestyle possible of wealthy merchants of the 1920s, and the kind of social milieu possible and popular among that class at the time. It has technical and research significance as a rare intact example of the landscape design of Max Shelley, a garden designer active in 1920s Sydney and South Australia from the 1930s onward, and as a rare example of domestic architecture of Neville Hampson in Sydney. Boomerang has added historic significance as it incorporates landscape remnants of the former Macleay Elizabeth Bay estate garden, namely remnant trees from the grounds of the Macleay's Linnean Society of NSW Hall (1885).
Date significance updated: 07 Jan 14
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Designer/Maker: Neville Hampson Architect (house); Max Shelley (and possibly Hampson & A.J. Doust) garden/grounds
Construction years: 1926-1928
Physical description: House:The house is a Spanish Mission mansion of three levels designed by Neville Hampson, 1926 for Frank Albert, sheet music/harmonica millionaire. Albert live there until his death in 1962. The house was named after his company's famous trademark, The Boomerang, which was the brand name of his popular songbooks and a range of mouth organs.

The house has a strong axial plan which leads from the port cochere to the water's edge. The interior is lavishly decorated and each bedroom has its own bathroom ensuite, dressing room and balcony, whilst the master bedroom has folding panels and concealed robes. The guest bedroom has its own private cloister balcony. The large compartmented basement level has a cinema seating 40 peoples, originally fittered with two 35mm arc projectors , film processing rooms, with a separately accessed workshop for the Albert's yachts.

Garden: 1820s-1926 part of Alexander Macleay's Elizabeth Bay estate garden. George Macleay subdivided and sold leaseholds of the estate between 1865 and 1882. In 1875 his cousin, William John Macleay, acquired the lease of blocks on the corner of Ithaca Road and Billyard Avenue. This allowed him to build his Macleayan Museum for his natural history collections, which had been previously stored in Elizabeth Bay House. These collections were transferred to the Macleayan Museum at the University of Sydney in 1888. William John Macleay constructed a building for the Linnean Society of NSW on an adjacent block in 1885. Several trees from the grounds of the Linnean Hall remain today - some on Boomerang include an old avocado tree (Persea gratissima) and a large mango tree (Mangifera indica) on the external southern (streetside) front wall on the SE side of the entry gate. Also possibly from this time/Macleay ownership period is a large camellia (C.japonica) in front garden on W side of carriage drive near gate (this tree/shrub is at least 1920s, possibly older, and the Macleays were noted Camellia enthusiasts/hybridisers at Camden Park estate). Outside Boomerang remnants of the Linnean Hall grounds include a remnant black bean tree (Castanospermum australe) and Moreton Bay Fig (Ficus macrophylla) line the southern street boundary of adjacent Billyard Avenue properties to the west. Other estate remains elsewhere include a grotto (part natural sandstone cliff overhang, part carved niche and details, and sections of an elaborate sandstone steps and a retaining wall and balustrade, behind (south) of Art Deco flats across (south of) Billyard Avenue. George Macleay subdivided and sold leaseholds of the estate between 1865 and 1882. In 1875 his cousin, William John Macleay, acquired the lease of blocks on the corner of Ithaca Road and Billyard Avenue. This allowed him to build his Macleayan Museum for his natural history collections, which had been previously stored in Elizabeth Bay House. These collections were transferred to the Macleayan Museum at the University of Sydney in 1888. William John Macleay constructed a building for the Linnean Society of NSW on an adjacent block in 1885. Several trees from the grounds of the Linnean Hall remain today - some on Boomerang include an old avocado tree (Persea gratissima) and a large mango tree (Mangifera indica) on the external southern (streetside) front wall on the SE side of the entry gate. Also possibly from this time/Macleay ownership period is a large camellia (C.japonica) in front garden on W side of carriage drive near gate (this tree/shrub is at least 1920s, possibly older, and the Macleays were noted Camellia enthusiasts/hybridisers at Camden Park estate). Outside Boomerang remnants of the Linnean Hall grounds include a remnant black bean tree (Castanospermum australe) and Moreton Bay Fig (Ficus macrophylla) line the southern street boundary of adjacent Billyard Avenue properties to the west. Other estate remains elsewhere include a grotto (part natural sandstone cliff overhang, part carved niche and details, and sections of an elaborate sandstone steps and a retaining wall and balustrade, behind (south) of Art Deco flats across (south of) Billyard Avenue. The garden was designed by M.R. (Max) Shelley, possibly in conjunction with Hampson. A large urban residential garden, the structure of the garden is defined by the built elements, in particular the walls, entry drive, courtyards, terraces, ponds and external spaces of the garden. The garden retains many of the original planted "structure" of trees and shrubs. While much more lush, dense and shady than its early planting appears, the mature garden retains its overall character with a Mediterranean/ Hollywood/Islamic flavour and a combination of palms, cypresses, dense tree and English flower planting. Today the dominant theme is subtropical. The original garden was designed and planted by landscape architect M.R.(Max) Shelley, perhaps in combination with architect Neville Hampson. Shelley's liberal use of subtropical species - palms, bananas, araucarias, Mediterranean cypresses and a Mediterranean/Hollywood/Islamic flavour remains today. Mediterranean cypresses have been replaced by the wider growing Bhutan cypresses and Chinese fan palms today. The former Linnean Society garden. Early elements noted to survive in a 2000 Historic Houses Trust book "Elizabeth Bay House - a guide" include the mango, a Queensland black bean, (Castanospermum australe) and a Norfolk Island hibiscus, (Lagunaria patersonae). Some 1926 plantings remain, including a collection of palms, Lord Howe Island palms, (Howea fosteriana/belmoreana), Cocos Island palms, (Syragus romanzoffianum), pygmy date palms (one in the western courtyard) (Phoenix roebelinii), Chinese fan palms, (Trachycarpus fortunei), a Norfolk Island pine, Araucaria heterophylla, north of the courtyard to the house's west, Canary Island date palms, (Phoenix canariensis), Bhutan cypresses, (Cupressus torulosa), Queensland nut/macadamia, (M.tetraphylla). Many landscape details remain intact from the 1926 original, including multicoloured herringbone brick paving carriage loop and other brick/tile/concrete paving, sandstone crazy paved base to sundial and benches, wrought iron railings, fences and gates, colonnaded courtyard to west, service courtyard to east, matching sandstone benches on the northern lawn, sandstone and bronze sundial, square Moorish concrete and multicoloured ceramic tile planter tubs north of the house on the terrace, original plastered walls with window grills, doors (eg: to south street side, to NE to former tennis court now public park), former tennis court sheds attached to walls (now within public park), northern terrace, standard steel pole lights throughout, sandstone steps to northern lawn, SE corner colonnaded pergola in iron and timber, boatshed/house/studio (now part of neighbouring property), sea wall, jetty, ceramic tiled and sandstone ponds, fountains (one in courtyard to south, another in courtyard to west, one on entrance lobby wall with Aboriginal face), terrazzo steps (to western courtyard, to northern terrace, in porte cochere). (Stuart Read, 20 August 2001 visit)

Beare Park: The western part of the park was part of the Boomerang property during the period 1925 to 1975 and contains a number of elements of significance which contribute to an understanding of the heritage importance of Boomerang:
• The site of the former tennis court
• Multi-coloured brick steps and herringbone brick paving (aligned on tennis court axis)
• Pavilion structure (now leased to Sydney Water) and associated walls, gateway
• Rendered Spanish Mission style boundary walls along southern and eastern boundaries of the park incorporating an arched pedestrian gateway near Ithaca Road
• Stone paved pathways within lawn area and immediately behind sea wall
• Rendered masonry balustrade wall atop the sandstone sea wall (truncated former wall)
Physical condition and/or
Archaeological potential:
Garden A relatively high degree of design and layout intactness to original design, some planting modification and some structural, generally sympathetic and of a high quality matching original. The central sundial on the northern lawn has been relocated to the side garden in the NE corner and a swimming pool was placed centrally in the lawn. The four crazy paved paths that led to the former sundial are gone, although the sundial base and benches bases still use sandstone crazy paving. While much more lush, dense and shady than its early planting appears, the mature garden retains its overall character with a Mediterranean/ Hollywood/Islamic flavour and a combination of palms, cypresses, dense tree and English flower planting. Today the dominant theme is subtropical. Shelley's 1926 flower details have gone, along with the sun levels depleting as trees grew. 1980s changes put some colour back into the garden, which by then was overgrown and shady - including oleanders, cliveas. Shelley's 1926 Mediterranean cypresses have been replaced by the wider growing Bhutan cypresses and Chinese fan palms today. Older elements predating 1926 remain from Alexander Macleay's former Elizabeth Bay estate, of which this section formed part of the orchard, and was close to the former Linnean Society garden. These include a large mango tree, Mangifera indica and an avocado, Persea gratissima growing against the external wall on the SE side of the entry gate. Early elements claimed to survive in a 2000 Historic Houses Trust book "Elizabeth Bay House - a guide" include the mango, a Queensland black bean, Castanospermum australe) and a Norfolk Island hibiscus, (Lagunaria patersonae). Some 1926 plantings remain, including a collection of palms, Lord Howe Island palms, (Howea fosteriana/belmoreana), Cocos Island palms, (Cocos romanzoffianum), pygmy date palms (one in the western courtyard) (Phoenix roebelinii), Chinese fan palms, (Trachycarpus fortunei), a Norfolk Island pine, Araucaria heterophylla, north of the courtyard to the house's west, Canary Island date palms, (Phoenix canariensis), Bhutan cypresses, (Cupressus torulosa), Queensland nut/macadamia, (M.tetraphylla). Many landscape details remain intact from the 1926 original, including multicoloured herringbone brick paving carriage loop and other brick/tile/concrete paving, sandstone crazy paved base to sundial and benches, wrought iron railings, fences and gates, colonnaded courtyard to west, service courtyard to east, matching sandstone benches on the northern lawn, sandstone and bronze sundial, square Moorish concrete and multicoloured ceramic tile planter tubs north of the house on the terrace, original plastered walls with window grills, doors (eg: to south street side, to NE to former tennis court now public park), former tennis court sheds attached to walls (now within public park), northern terrace, standard steel pole lights throughout, sandstone steps to northern lawn, SE corner colonnaded pergola in iron and timber, boatshed/house/studio (now part of neighbouring property), sea wall, jetty, ceramic tiled and sandstone ponds, fountains (one in courtyard to south, another in courtyard to west, one on entrance lobby wall with Aboriginal face), terrazzo steps (to western courtyard, to northern terrace, in porte cochere). (Stuart Read, 20/8/01 visit)
Date condition updated:19 Oct 04
Modifications and dates: Garden:

Pre 1926 this section of Alexander Macleay's Elizabeth Bay estate garden was part of the orangery: remnants surviving today (on Boomerang) include an old avocado tree (Persea gratissima) and a mango (Mangifera indica) on the southern (streetside) front wall, east of the main entry, possibly also a large camellia (C.japonica) in front garden on W side of carriage drive near gate (this tree/shrub is at least 1920s, possibly older, and the Macleays were noted Camellia enthusiasts/hybridisers at Camden Park estate). Outside Boomerang a remnant black bean tree (Castanospermum australe) and Moreton Bay Fig (Ficus macrophylla) line Billyard Avenue properties to the west - both probably Macleay estate tree remnants also. Other estate remains include a grotto (part natural sandstone cliff overhang, part carved niche and details, and sections of an elaborate sandstone steps and a retaining wall and balustrade, behind (south) of Art Deco flats across (south of) Billyard Avenue. 1926 House built ; its architect was Neville Hampson; and garden/courtyards made around it, richly planted by landscape designer Max Shelley, possibly in conjunction with Hampson. It was built on the site of an earlier house called 'Boomerang', being one of a row of Edwardian homes built on a 1875 subdivision of Elizabeth Bay House estate, Colonial Secretary Alexander Macleay's grand gardenesque folly, widely considered at the time (1820s onward) as "the finest house and garden in the colony". Mr A.J.Doust, a landscape gardener active in the Eastern Suburbs in the late 1920s and 1930s is also known to have worked on Boomerang's grounds, perhaps on its maintenance or adaptations as plantings matured. The garden and Shelley's involvement were featured in an article in magazine "The Home" of 1 February 1929, with photographs by Harold Cazneaux. Clearly based on Hollywood mansions of the period and well known in Sydney society at the time, Boomerang was the scene of much entertaining (Albert had a private cinema built in the basement for guests) and subsequent to his death, to much land speculation. 1970s makeover to landscape south of (now) pool on northern (rear) yard. 1978 estate subdivided (lots to east on Ithaca Road created) post 1982 (& pre 1989) northern lawn modified to install swimming pool, Seafront rose garden removed, removed crazy paved cruciform paths, and relocating sundial to north-east garden bed. C.1989/90 - 1970s "makeover" to landscape south of pool towards house was altered (Matthew Taylor/Taylor Bremer Landscape Architects) - a number of intrusive elements and inappropriate planting were removed. Agapathus plantings were retained, based on early photographic evidence of the type of plantings in that area. Climbing roses were replanted on front walls to Billyard Avenue (since removed). Ixora sp. Were planted near the front wall to supplement existing plantings. Existing cypresses in front garden retained. (Note: Bhutan cypresses in an avenue around the ornamental pool (Cupressus torulosa) were probably added at this time - these are now mature and over 10m tall, shading the pool and garden. Post 1996 Garage/Butler's quarters/mechanics area changed by then owners the Mounts to be a guest house, materials and finishes generally matching those inside the main house. Still retains the engine hoist, and some garaging space on ground level. Petrol pump gone. Works done to match details inside house, eg: guest bathroom in similar dark blue iridescent tiles/gold. 2001 visit noting changes made probably in the late 1990s (Stuart Read, pers. Comm.) Lord Howe Island palms (Howea fosteriana) planted on western side of rear (north) garden for privacy screen from 2 storey Edwardian house (also a former Albert property) Courtyard to west of house - initial 1926 bananas planting is now replaced with pygmy date palms (Phoenix roebelinii), to match one existing older speciment on SE side near house (which was there in 1926 photos) - this tree was nearly lost in a big hailstorm in 2000 Front (south) garden - 2 Chinese fan/windmill palms, Trachycarpus fortunei added to Sth end of the ornamental pool, for some privacy from flats over Billyard Avenue. Then owner Mr Mount noted he could've put in wider growing Bhutan cypresses (Cupressus torulosa) to gain more privacy - but didn't - recognising that neighbours enjoy the front garden too/outlook into it. A Norfolk Island hibiscus (Lagunaria patersonae) also reputedly remaining (Carlin/HHT, 2000) from Macleay's estate is not now on Boomerang, but may (like the black bean and Moreton Bay fig mentioned above) be on other properties to the west on Billyard Avenue. A rich collection of ornamental palms are on site, ones in the SW corner near the gate include Cocos Island palm (Syragus romanzoffianum), and NE of the carriage loop nearer the house (and elsewhere eg E of carriage loop near house) are Lord Howe Island palms (Kentia fosteriana and K.belmoreana), Chinese windmill/fan palm (Trachycarpus fortunei). These palms look to date from the 1920s Max Shelley original plantings on site. (S.Read, pers.comm. 2001).
Further information: A Conservation Management Plan is needed which is to include the house and garden as well as grounds and outlying elements within Beare Park, such as former tennis court, the former boathouse (now part of 34 Billyard Ave) and the jetty.

Heritage Inventory sheets are often not comprehensive, and should be regarded as a general guide only. Inventory sheets are based on information available, and often do not include the social history of sites and buildings. Inventory sheets are constantly updated by the City as further information becomes available. An inventory sheet with little information may simply indicate that there has been no building work done to the item recently: it does not mean that items are not significant. Further research is always recommended as part of preparation of development proposals for heritage items, and is necessary in preparation of Heritage Impact Assessments and Conservation Management Plans, so that the significance of heritage items can be fully assessed prior to submitting development applications.
Current use: House and garden
Former use: House and garden

History

Historical notes: The "Eora people" was the name given to the coastal Aborigines around Sydney. Central Sydney is therefore often referred to as "Eora Country". Within the City of Sydney local government area, the traditional owners are the Cadigal and Wangal bands of the Eora.

With the invasion of the Sydney region, the Cadigal and Wangal people were decimated but there are descendants still living in Sydney today.

From 1820s-1926 the site was part of Alexander Macleay's Elizabeth Bay Estate garden. George Macleay subdivided and sold leaseholds of the estate between 1865 and 1882. In 1875 his cousin, William John Macleay, acquired the lease of blocks on the corner of Ithaca Road and Billyard Avenue. This allowed him to build his Macleayan Museum for his natural history collections, which had been previously stored in Elizabeth Bay House. These collections were transferred to the Macleayan Museum at the University of Sydney in 1888. William John Macleay constructed a building for the Linnean Society of NSW on an adjacent block in 1885. Several trees from the grounds of the Linnean Hall remain today - some on Boomerang include an old avocado tree (Persea gratissima) and a large mango tree (Mangifera indica) on the external southern (streetside) front wall on the SE side of the entry gate. Also possibly from this time/Macleay ownership period is a large camellia (C.japonica) in front garden on W side of carriage drive near gate (this tree/shrub is at least 1920s, possibly older, and the Macleays were noted Camellia enthusiasts/hybridisers at Camden Park estate). Outside Boomerang remnants of the Linnean Hall grounds include a remnant black bean tree (Castanospermum australe) and Moreton Bay Fig (Ficus macrophylla) line the southern street boundary of adjacent Billyard Avenue properties to the west. Other estate remains elsewhere include a grotto (part natural sandstone cliff overhang, part carved niche and details, and sections of an elaborate sandstone steps and a retaining wall and balustrade, behind (south) of Art Deco flats across (south of) Billyard Avenue.

The house was designed by English architect Neville Hampson for music publisher Frank Albert, who lived there from 1926 till his death in 1962. It was named after Frank Albert's company's "Boomerang" trademark, the brand name of his popular sheet music and a range of mouth organs. . "Boomerang" brought the Hollywood-influenced "Spanish mission" style to Sydney. The house was constructed in 1926 house for Frank Albert, sheet music/harmonica millionaire; its architect was Neville Hampson; its garden was designed by M.R. (Max) Shelley, possibly in conjunction with Hampson. It was built on the site of an earlier house called 'Boomerang', being one of a row of Edwardian homes built on a 1875 subdivision of Elizabeth Bay House estate, Colonial Secretary Alexander Macleay's grand gardenesque folly, widely considered at the time (1820s onward) as "the finest house and garden in the colony". Mr A.J.Doust, a landscape gardener active in the Eastern Suburbs in the late 1920s and 1930s is also known to have worked on Boomerang's grounds, perhaps on its maintenance or adaptations as plantings matured. The garden and Shelley's involvement were featured in an article in magazine "The Home" of 1 February 1929, with photographs by Harold Cazneaux. Clearly based on Hollywood mansions of the period and well known in Sydney society at the time, Boomerang was the scene of much entertaining (Albert had a private cinema built in the basement for guests) and subsequent to his death, to much land speculation.

In 1962 Frank Albert died, house remained empty for 16 years - neither son appeared to be interested. A live-in caretaker and gardener were the only occupants. In 1975 1- 3 Ithaca Road was purchased by the CIty of Sydney for an extension to Beare Park. In 1978 the property was sold to speculators Tom Hayson and son Ian, who quickly subdivided the estate creating the lots to the east on Ithaca Gardens.

The house was resold to oil recycler Peter Burnett and wife Astrid, becoming reputedly Sydney's first million dollar sale ($1.2 million) 1980 auctioned but passed in. 1981 sold to businessman Peter Fox (then financier of films) July 1982 sold after Fox's death in a car crash to bookmaker Mark Read, who installed the swimming pool on the northern lawn, relocating the sundial to a garden bed in the north-east corner. 1985 sold to property developer Warren Anderson, and expansively furnished with Regency antiques, paintings and French empire clocks. 1991 listed for auction but did not attract a buyer. September 1993 Bank of New York took possession, after public legal disputes with Anderson. Listed for mortgagee auction. Tense competing team security guard stand off before auction, triggering Supreme Court proceedings to evict Anderson. 1993 telephone pager entrepreneur Nati Stoliar and wife Miki bought the property. Post 1996 sold to Kowloon based expatriate funds manager Duncan Mount and wife Sally. Major improvements to property carried out under their ownership (including Butler's quarters/garage converted into guest quarters) 2000 listed for auction, selling in early 2002 to contract cleaner John Schaeffer and wife Julie. Schaeffer also the owner of mansion, Rona, Ginahgullah Road, Bellevue Hill. (Sydney Morning Herald, Good Weekend, 9 November 2002: 23)

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Community facilities-

Assessment of significance

SHR Criteria a)
[Historical significance]
Boomerang is of historical significance both for its influence on architecture in Sydney as the first example of the Spanish Mission style.
SHR Criteria b)
[Associative significance]
Boomerang is associated with music publisher Frank Albert 1926-1962.

It is also associated with Neville Hampson, an English architect who designed Boormeang and is attributed to bringing the Spanish Mission style to Sydney.
SHR Criteria c)
[Aesthetic significance]
Boomerang is a grand, influential, architect designed example of the Inter-war Spanish Mission style. The design of the house brought this Hollywood-influenced style to Sydney.
SHR Criteria d)
[Social significance]
Boomerang is of social significance as representative of the lifestyle of one of the most wealthy people in Society at its time of construction, the house continues to maintain its social cache to the present.
SHR Criteria f)
[Rarity]
Rare as a very fine, grand and influential example of the Spanish Mission style associated with a prominent, wealthy individual in Sydney society in the 1920s.
Assessment criteria: Items are assessed against the PDF State Heritage Register (SHR) Criteria to determine the level of significance. Refer to the Listings below for the level of statutory protection.

Recommended management:

The site should be retained and conserved. A Conservation Management Plan should be prepared for the site. It is to also address outlying elements of Boomerang includng the Boathouse and those elements which are now located within Beare Park such as • The site of the former tennis court • Multi-coloured brick steps and herringbone brick paving (aligned on tennis court axis) • Pavilion structure (now leased to Sydney Water) and associated walls, gateway • Rendered Spanish Mission style boundary walls along southern and eastern boundaries of the park incorporating an arched pedestrian gateway near Ithaca Road • Stone paved pathways within lawn area and immediately behind sea wall • Rendered masonry balustrade wall atop the sandstone sea wall (truncated former wall). A Heritage Assessment and Heritage Impact Statement, should be prepared for the site prior to any major works being undertaken. There shall be no vertical additions to the building and no alterations to the façade of the building other than to reinstate original features. The principal room layout and planning configuration as well as significant internal original features including ceilings, cornices, joinery, flooring and fireplaces should be retained and conserved. Any additions and alterations should be confined to the rear in areas of less significance, should not be visibly prominent and shall be in accordance with the relevant planning controls.

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Local Environmental PlanSydney Local Environmental Plan 2012I57514 Dec 12   
Heritage study     

Study details

TitleYearNumberAuthorInspected byGuidelines used
South Sydney Heritage Study1993 Tropman & Tropman Architects  Yes

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
WrittenAnita Heiss Aboriginal People and Place, Barani: Indigenous History of Sydney City View detail
WrittenApperly, Irving & Reynolds1989A Pictorial Guide to Identifying Australian Architecture
WrittenNSW Heirtage Office2002HerItage Inventory Report "Boomerang"
WrittenSydney Architecture1997Graham Jahn

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

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Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Local Government
Database number: 2420156
File number: HC 32046 & S90/01684


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