Terrace Group Including Interiors | NSW Environment, Energy and Science

Culture and heritage

Heritage

Terrace Group Including Interiors

Item details

Name of item: Terrace Group Including Interiors
Type of item: Built
Group/Collection: Residential buildings (private)
Category: Terrace
Primary address: 32-52 High Holborn Street, Surry Hills, NSW 2010
Parish: Alexandria
County: Cumberland
Local govt. area: Sydney
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
32-52 High Holborn StreetSurry HillsSydneyAlexandriaCumberlandPrimary Address

Statement of significance:

The terraces are of historical significance as representatives of the better forms of housing constructed following the slum clearances of the early 1900s. Of aesthetic significance as simple yet well detailed examples of working class housing of the early 20th century. As a Federation era terrace, the group is rare in the local area (other examples of Federation era terraces on South Dowling Street are grander).
Date significance updated: 09 Mar 05
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Construction years: 1903-1904
Physical description: Single storey Federation era face brick terrace house group with gabled corrugated metal roofs, rendered fin walls extending above roof level, central chimneys. Original front verandah roofs are steeply pitched convex curved corrugated metal. Each terrace is wide, with a central front door and fanlight flanked on each side by a single timber framed double hung window, with the top sash of each window featuring 9 panes with coloured glass. The front fence/verandah balustrade is a cast iron palisade fence with a pair of centrally placed timber posts between which the cast iron gate is hung. The timber posts each feature a pair of decorative timber brackets. The terraces back onto Cleveland Avenue.
Physical condition and/or
Archaeological potential:
Mostly intact, however some face brickwork has been painted, and also some roof alterations have been undertaken (rear dormers, skylights).
Date condition updated:09 Mar 05
Modifications and dates: No. 52 had an attic conversion in 1995 (DA 1994/968 & BA1995/19); No. 46 had alterations including a rear attic dormer in 1997 (DA 1996/981, BA1997/595).
Further information: No front dormer windows or skylights should be permitted. Face brickwork should not be painted, and stripping of paint from face brickwork using non-abrasive chemical methods should be encouraged. Replacement of original convex curved front verandah roofs with simpler profiles should not be permitted. Skillion front verandah roofs should be replaced with original profile verandah roofs.

Heritage Inventory sheets are often not comprehensive, and should be regarded as a general guide only. Inventory sheets are based on information available, and often do not include the social history of sites and buildings. Inventory sheets are constantly updated by the City as further information becomes available. An inventory sheet with little information may simply indicate that there has been no building work done to the item recently: it does not mean that items are not significant. Further research is always recommended as part of preparation of development proposals for heritage items, and is necessary in preparation of Heritage Impact Assessments and Conservation Management Plans, so that the significance of heritage items can be fully assessed prior to submitting development applications.

History

Historical notes: The "Eora people" was the name given to the coastal Aborigines around Sydney. Central Sydney is therefore often referred to as "Eora Country". Within the City of Sydney local government area, the traditional owners are the Cadigal and Wangal bands of the Eora. There is no written record of the name of the language spoken and currently there are debates as whether the coastal peoples spoke a separate language "Eora" or whether this was actually a dialect of the Dharug language. Remnant bushland in places like Blackwattle Bay retain elements of traditional plant, bird and animal life, including fish and rock oysters.

With the invasion of the Sydney region, the Cadigal and Wangal people were decimated but there are descendants still living in Sydney today. All cities include many immigrants in their population. Aboriginal people from across the state have been attracted to suburbs such as Pyrmont, Balmain, Rozelle, Glebe and Redfern since the 1930s. Changes in government legislation in the 1960s provided freedom of movement enabling more Aboriginal people to choose to live in Sydney.

(Information sourced from Anita Heiss, "Aboriginal People and Place", Barani: Indigenous History of Sydney City http://www.cityofsydney.nsw.gov.au/barani ) High Holborn Street is within the original land grant to Captain Joseph Foveaux, who was assigned 105 acres in 1793 and subsequently increased his holdings to encompass most of Surry Hills. By 1800 John Palmer had acquired more than 200 acres of Surry Hills. By 1814, due to financial stress, Palmer's estate was divided and sold at public auction. Edward Riley attempted to reassemble the Palmer estate in the 1820s, however after his death in 1825 the holdings were once again subdivided according to Meehan's original plan and sold off again. However much of the Riley Estate was locked up in a legal battle, preventing further development until the 1850s. High Holborn Street was previously known as Union Street (as shown on an 1865 map). During the late 19th century the inner city area including Surry Hills became overcrowded and much housing was considered substandard and unhealthy. After the outbreak of bubonic plague in The Rocks in 1901, a government-appointed Commissions investigated the condition of housing in the inner city, and the report resulted in a slum clearance program which affected The Rocks, Millers Point, Surry Hills, Camperdown, Chippendale, in many areas resulted in wholesale demolition of small-scale housing and replacement with new housing or factories. The houses at 32-52 High Holborn Street were part of this major wave of inner-city redevelopment at the beginning of the 20th century. The terraces were constructed in 1903-1904. Walter Uther was the original owner of the terraces, John Hills the second owner sold the terraces to W. Freeman in 1906/07. From 1914 the owner was Peter W. Byers. The fact that the terraces were bought and sold as a group indicates that they were constructed and used primarily as working class housing. The terraces therefore represent one of the forms of improved working class housing which were constructed in the inner city following the slum clearance program of the early 1900s.

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Community facilities-

Assessment of significance

SHR Criteria a)
[Historical significance]
The terraces are representative of the better forms of housing constructed following the slum clearances of the early 1900s.
SHR Criteria c)
[Aesthetic significance]
Simple yet well detailed examples of working class housing of the early 20th century.
SHR Criteria f)
[Rarity]
As a Federation era terrace, the group is rare in the local area (other examples of Federation era terraces on South Dowling Street are grander).
SHR Criteria g)
[Representativeness]
Representative of better forms of housing built following the slum clearances of the early 1900s.
Integrity/Intactness: Intact except for some painting of brickwork, some roof alterations (rear dormers, skylights).
Assessment criteria: Items are assessed against the PDF State Heritage Register (SHR) Criteria to determine the level of significance. Refer to the Listings below for the level of statutory protection.

Recommended management:

No front dormer windows or skylights should be permitted. Face brickwork should not be painted, and stripping of paint from face brickwork using non-abrasive chemical methods should be encouraged. Replacement of original convex curved front verandah roofs with simpler profiles should not be permitted. Skillion front verandah roofs should be replaced with original profile verandah roofs. The building should be retained and conserved. A Heritage Assessment and Heritage Impact Statement, or a Conservation Management Plan, should be prepared for the building prior to any major works being undertaken. There shall be no vertical additions to the building and no alterations to the fa├žade of the building other than to reinstate original features. The principal room layout and planning configuration as well as significant internal original features including ceilings, cornices, joinery, flooring and fireplaces should be retained and conserved. Any additions and alterations should be confined to the rear in areas of less significance, should not be visibly prominent and shall be in accordance with the relevant planning controls.

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Local Environmental PlanSydney LEP 2012I155614 Dec 12   
Heritage study     

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
WrittenAnita Heiss Aboriginal People and Place, Barani: Indigenous History of Sydney City
WrittenGutnik Design Group2004Heritage Impact Assessment for Proposed Alterations & Additions to existing single storey terrace at 48 High Holborn Street Surry Hills

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

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Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Local Government
Database number: 2420336


Every effort has been made to ensure that information contained in the State Heritage Inventory is correct. If you find any errors or omissions please send your comments to the Database Manager.

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