House and Flat Building Group "Manar" Including Interiors, Front Fence And Groun | NSW Environment & Heritage

Culture and heritage

Heritage

House and Flat Building Group "Manar" Including Interiors, Front Fence And Groun

Item details

Name of item: House and Flat Building Group "Manar" Including Interiors, Front Fence And Groun
Type of item: Built
Group/Collection: Residential buildings (private)
Category: Mansion
Primary address: 40A-42 Macleay Street, Elizabeth Bay, NSW 2011
Local govt. area: Sydney
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
40A-42 Macleay StreetElizabeth BaySydney  Primary Address

Statement of significance:

Manar has high local historic and aesthetic significance. The site provides evidence of the development and growth of flats as desirable dwelling types in Sydney in the early 20th Century.

Manar is a unique and locally rare example of three related buildings that form a small complex of inter-war residential flat buildings within landscaped grounds. The exteriors of the buildings are fine examples of the Inter-war Free Classical style, designed by prominent architects Ernest A Scott and Green, whilst the interiors of Buildings 2 and 3, particularly in the public areas, contain fine and intact finishes and detailing that provides evidence of conservative middle class taste during the early inter-war period. The setting, which includes the gardens and landscaped open space, and views available from the site are important part of character of the group.

The site also has significance because its rear boundary incorporates a cliff face that is part of an escarpment that was formed by the blasting of the Darlinghurst Ridge by convict labour in the 1830s to provide a level site for the construction of Elizabeth Bay House.
Date significance updated: 16 Jan 12
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Designer/Maker: Ernest A. Scott and Green
Builder/Maker: Building 2 E Beale. Modifications to 1881 building Rose and Mears
Construction years: 1881-1927
Physical description: Manar comprises three blocks of flat, the exteriors of which are fine example of the Inter-war Free Classical style. Building 1, the c 1881 Victorian residence that was adapted for apartments in 1920, has a generous setback from Macleay Street, with Building 2 (c 1920) behind it and Building 3( c 1927) built to the Macleay Street frontage and adjoining the boundary with No 40 Macleay Street.

The buildings are two to three storey in height with cement rendered masonry walls embellished by moulded detailing and covered by terracotta tiles roofs. Evidence of the c 1881 house that was converted into Building 1, is most visible in the eaves on the north-western and north-eastern corners and by the chimneys.

The construction of the building interiors consist of masonry walls and timber framed floors with reinforced concrete floor slabs and stairs in public areas. Apartments in Building 1 are individually accessed, although there is a common service stair constructed of timber at the rear of the building. There is some evidence of the c 1881 house layout and some joinery such as in some of the French doors. Buildings 2 and 3 are organized around central stair halls. These spaces in both buildings are remarkably intact and good examples of their type, with fine terrazzo floors, terrazzo lined stairs, timber joinery items such as stair handrails and balustrade, directory boards and glazed entrance doors and decorative plaster ceiling mouldings. Leadlight glazed windows are an attractive feature of the stair hall in Building 2. The door to individual apartments in Building 2 are original, or at very least early, whilst those in Building 3 were replaced to satisfy fire safety requirements when Manar came under the provisions of the Strata Titles Act. Because of the long configuration of the stair hall in Building 3, along with its intenral location, steel framed windows adjacent to apartment doors provide supplementary light from light wells. Building 2 also contains a Queensland Maple settle (seat) in the entrance hall.

There is a palisade fence on a substantial rendered base along the Macleay Street frontage of the property from Building 3 to the boundary with No 38 Macleay Street. The buildings are set in landscaped surrounds, with a number of mature trees, and this landscaping is quite an unusual feature for inter-war flat sites in the area. At the rear towards the Onslow Place boundary is a single storey brick garage. The rear boundary forms part of a 12m cliff face which is part of an escarpment that was formed by the blasting of the Darlinghurst Ridge by convict labour in the 1830s to provide a level site for the construction of Elizabeth Bay House. Refer to the separate inventory for the cliff face.
Physical condition and/or
Archaeological potential:
Good
Date condition updated:13 Jan 12
Modifications and dates: Balconies have been enlcosed. A number of flats have been subject to internal modifications.
Further information: Refer to the separate inventory for the Cliff Face at the rear of the property.

Heritage Inventory sheets are often not comprehensive, and should be regarded as a general guide only. Inventory sheets are based on information available, and often do not include the social history of sites and buildings. Inventory sheets are constantly updated by the City as further information becomes available. An inventory sheet with little information may simply indicate that there has been no building work done to the item recently: it does not mean that items are not significant. Further research is always recommended as part of preparation of development proposals for heritage items, and is necessary in preparation of Heritage Impact Assessments and Conservation Management Plans, so that the significance of heritage items can be fully assessed prior to submitting development applications.
Current use: residential
Former use: residential

History

Historical notes: The "Eora people" was the name given to the coastal Aborigines around Sydney. Central Sydney is therefore often referred to as "Eora Country". Within the City of Sydney local government area, the traditional owners are the Cadigal and Wangal bands of the Eora.

With European Occupation of the Sydney region from 1788, the Cadigal and Wangal people were largely decimated but there are descendants still living in Sydney today.

The site is part of the original land grant given to Alexander Macleay which was formalized in 1831. In 1848 Macleay died and the estate was inherited by his son William. William Macleay in turn willed the estate to his brother George, and on his death to his nephew Arthur Onslow. On 1 September 1873 a lease was drawn up between George Macleay and Emma Lamb in relation to Lots 16,17 and 18 of the subdivision of Elizabeth Bay estate. A house called Manar Cottage appears to have been built on some of the leased land during 1867 and occupied by Emma Lambs son, Alfred and his family. Alfred Lamb had mercantile interests which traded as a company called Alfred Lamb and Company and he attained a degree of social prominence by representing West Sydney in the NSW Legislative Assembly in the years 1889 and 1890. "Manar Cottage" was replaced by a larger house with the same name in 1881.

After Lamb died, his wife stayed on in the house for about two years when it was occupied by S.A. Stephen during 1892 and Mrs. W Lamb during 1893.An indenture dated 22 April 1892 signed by the Honorable James Norton and James Macarthur Onslow acknowledged that the land now belonged to the latter. Manar was then occupied by a succession of tenants, then the Morton family from 1908 until 1919 when the property was conveyed to music publisher David Davis Klippel.

Klippel set about redeveloping the site engaging the firm Ernest A Scott and Green to convert Manar into residential flats and for a new block of flats to the east of the house, which was constructed c1920. In 1926 another block of flats for the north-western part of the site were designed by the same architects for Klippel.

The architectural practice of Ernest A Scott and Green ( 1911-1932), which later became known as Scott Green and Scott (1932- 1947) when Ernest's son Thomas became a partner, designed a wide number of buildings including hotels, churches, commerical buildings and private residences. Examples of flats they designed within in the City of Sydney, in addition to Manar, included Kurrajong Flats at 132-136 Darlinghurst Road (1928), Belgenny at 389-393 Bourke Street (1938) and The Claridge (Flinders and Taylor Streets) 1941. .After Green left the practice in 1947 its name was correspondingly altered to EA and TM Scott. Ernest Scott died in 1949.

The inter-war period saw the development and growth of flats as desirable dwelling types in Sydney, particularly in Darlinghurst, Potts Point and Elizabeth Bay.

Manar has been the home to a number of prominent and professional citizens. These includes Mango McCallum who lived there during 1929 and influential publisher Sydney Uren Smith, who moved into an apartment during 1931. After the war, notable residents have included Sir Garfield Barwick and his family, Senator John Ignatius Armstrong, one time alderman for the City of Sydney Phillip Ward and Lord Mayor during 1966-67, Lady Macewan widow of Sir Jack Macewan, who led the Country Party at one time, and Mary Bailey - Tart, the only daughter of former Prime Minsiter Sir Early Page. A current resident is Dr Rowan Nicks , a distinguished surgeon and the first to insert a heart pacemaker into a recipient in Australia.

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. (none)-

Assessment of significance

SHR Criteria a)
[Historical significance]
The site provides evidence of the development and growth of flats as desirable dwelling types in Sydney in the early 20th Century.

The site also has significance because its rear boundary incorporates a cliff face that is part of an escarpment that was formed by the blasting of the Darlinghurst Ridge by convict labour in the 1830s to provide a level site for the construction of Elizabeth Bay House.
SHR Criteria b)
[Associative significance]
The site has important associations with the historically prominent Lamb family. Some of the fabric of Building 1 contains part of the house built by Alfred Lamb.

The existing buildings are also associated with architects Ernest A Scott and Green, who designed a number of prominent flats within the inter-war period.

Manar has been the home to several prominent individuals and families over the years.
SHR Criteria c)
[Aesthetic significance]
The exterior of the three buildings that make up Manar have aesthetic significance as fine examples of the Inter-war Free classical style set in landscaped surrounds. The interiors of Buildings 2 and 3, particularly within the public areas and in some flats contain fine and intact finished and decorative detailing that provides evidence of conservative middle class taste during the early inter-war period.

The setting, which includes the gardens and landscaped open space, and views available from the site are important part of character of the group.
SHR Criteria e)
[Research potential]
The site provides evidence of the development and growth of flats as desirable dwelling type in Sydney during the early twentieth century.
SHR Criteria f)
[Rarity]
A locally rare example of three related buildings that form a small complex of residential flat buildings within landscaped grounds.
SHR Criteria g)
[Representativeness]
Manar contains three buildings, the exterior of which are fine representative examples of Inter-war Free classical style residential flat buildings.
Integrity/Intactness: Relatively unaltered
Assessment criteria: Items are assessed against the PDF State Heritage Register (SHR) Criteria to determine the level of significance. Refer to the Listings below for the level of statutory protection.

Recommended management:

The buildings should be retained and conserved. A Heritage Assessment and Heritage Impact Statement, or a Conservation Management Plan, should be prepared for the building prior to any major works being undertaken. There shall be no vertical additions to the building and no alterations to the façade of the building other than to reinstate original features. The principal room layout and planning configuration as well as significant internal original features including ceilings, cornices, joinery, flooring and fireplaces should be retained and conserved. Any additions and alterations should be confined to the rear in areas of less significance, should not be visibly prominent and shall be in accordance with the relevant planning controls.

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Local Environmental PlanSydney LEP 2012I592  143
Heritage study     

Study details

TitleYearNumberAuthorInspected byGuidelines used
South Sydney Heritage Study1993 Tropman & Tropman Architects  Yes

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
Written  BA Plans 578/1919
WrittenAnita Heiss Aboriginal People and Place, Barani: Indigenous History of Sydney City
WrittenBuilding Magazine July 12 19211921 
WrittenDr Zeny Edwards2008National Trust Classifcation Report: Manar
WrittenRod Howard Heritage Conservation Pty Ltd200142 Macleay Street Heritage Impact Statement

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

rez rez rez rez
(Click on thumbnail for full size image and image details)

Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Local Government
Database number: 2420941


Every effort has been made to ensure that information contained in the State Heritage Inventory is correct. If you find any errors or omissions please send your comments to the Database Manager.

All information and pictures on this page are the copyright of the Heritage Division or respective copyright owners.