House "Aysleigh House" Including Interior and Front Fence | NSW Environment, Energy and Science

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Heritage

House "Aysleigh House" Including Interior and Front Fence

Item details

Name of item: House "Aysleigh House" Including Interior and Front Fence
Other name/s: Aysleigh House
Type of item: Built
Group/Collection: Residential buildings (private)
Category: House
Primary address: 74 Westmoreland Street, Glebe, NSW 2037
Local govt. area: Sydney
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
74 Westmoreland StreetGlebeSydney  Primary Address
144 & 144A St Johns RoadGlebeSydney  Alternate Address

Statement of significance:

The site provides evidence of the Bishopthorpe Estate, subdivided in 1856. The building has historical significance for its ability to evidence the consolidation of the Bishopthorpe Estate in the late 19th century. A large late-Italianate style house in a garden setting which together with the other substantial buildings on St Johns Road enhances the civic character of this part of Glebe. The house is of unusual massing and makes an important contribution to the streetscape. The unusual design of its cast iron balustrading is notable. An outstanding example of an Italianate house in a Victorian streetscape that is of high integrity.
Date significance updated: 27 Jul 06
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Construction years: 1895-1896
Physical description: The substantial house is prominently sited on the corner in the Bishopthorpe Estate. It is a transitional example from the Italianate. Much of the Italianate detail is evident; stucco, windows, cast iron, etc. The frontage and address is that of Westmoreland Street yet the main entrance is off St John's Road and by virtue of recognition of the corner situation the corner of the building is formed into a rectangular bay and revolved by 45 degrees. This breaks up the cubic mass of the building and provides two smaller verandahs to act as balconies by virtue of size rather than character. This planning results in the formation of gables as against the hipped and corniced roof. It stresses a growing individuality by breaking the form into small units (the bays) which contained highlight glazing of coloured leadlights.

One of the most interesting details of the house are the two-storey verandahs facing both north east and north west. The cast iron railings have an unusual decorative motif climbing vines on rustic style verticals and horizontals. The front door and windows to the main rooms are decorated with panels of coloured lead lights. The large garden is enclosed by an iron picket fence and a brick wall. The house is structurally intact but the interior has been converted for use as an art gallery.

A two-storey freestanding house that dates from the Federation period within the key period of significance, set on a wide corner site that has retained its context. The building is setback from the street. The site has an appropriate front fence of iron palisade on stone plinth and gate post approximately 1.5 metres high. The side fence is timber and brick wall. The front garden is informally landscaping and neglected and features a concrete path and slate steps and mature trees including Celtis, Privet, Conifers and Glochidon that screen the house. The façade presents a complex asymmetrical elevation and is constructed of rendered brick with a scribed finish on a rendered masonry base course. The roof is hipped with projecting gabled bays. The roof is clad in slate and features corbelled chimneys and terracotta chimney pots. The verandah is offset and has a straight profile. It features cast iron columns and balustrading, tessellated tiles, timber gable and detail. The façade features string course. The front door is offset and marked by a portico with fluted pilasters on vermiculated base and is panelled and glazed with fanlights, sidelights and security screen. Fenestration comprises vertically proportioned double hung timber windows with some leadlight, rendered bracketed sills and arch mouldings.The building appears to be in good condition and is highly intact. Alterations include detracting timber and brick fencing an concrete path.
Further information: Heritage Inventory sheets are often not comprehensive, and should be regarded as a general guide only. Inventory sheets are based on information available, and often do not include the social history of sites and buildings. Inventory sheets are constantly updated by the City as further information becomes available. An inventory sheet with little information may simply indicate that there has been no building work done to the item recently: it does not mean that items are not significant. Further research is always recommended as part of preparation of development proposals for heritage items, and is necessary in preparation of Heritage Impact Assessments and Conservation Management Plans, so that the significance of heritage items can be fully assessed prior to submitting development applications.

History

Historical notes: The "Eora people" was the name given to the coastal Aborigines around Sydney. Central Sydney is therefore often referred to as "Eora Country". Within the City of Sydney local government area, the traditional owners are the Cadigal and Wangal bands of the Eora. There is no written record of the name of the language spoken and currently there are debates as whether the coastal peoples spoke a separate language "Eora" or whether this was actually a dialect of the Dharug language. Remnant bushland in places like Blackwattle Bay retain elements of traditional plant, bird and animal life, including fish and rock oysters.

With the invasion of the Sydney region, the Cadigal and Wangal people were decimated but there are descendants still living in Sydney today. All cities include many immigrants in their population. Aboriginal people from across the state have been attracted to suburbs such as Pyrmont, Balmain, Rozelle, Glebe and Redfern since the 1930s. Changes in government legislation in the 1960s provided freedom of movement enabling more Aboriginal people to choose to live in Sydney.

(Information sourced from Anita Heiss, "Aboriginal People and Place", Barani: Indigenous History of Sydney City http://www.cityofsydney.nsw.gov.au/barani )

The Sydney Glebe lands were granted to the Church of England in 1789. In 1828 “to relieve the pressing needs of clergy”, Glebe was subdivided into 28 allotments and all but three lots (numbers 7,8 and 28) were offered for sale. Lot 28 was set apart for the residence of the Archdeacon and all revenue derived from the area retained for the Church and School Corporation "to and for the personal use and occupation of the Archdeacon of New South Wales and his successors forever". It was first known as the Archdeaconry. When in 1836 Dr WG Broughton was consecrated Bishop of Australia, the Archdeaconry became known as the Bishopthorpe Estate. This portion of Glebe was a part of the Parish of Christ Church St. Lawrence. In 1856 Bishopthorpe was divided into 238 allotments and offered on 99-year leases. “The subdivision has been on the most liberal scale – the streets being of the full proclaimed width of 66 ft with lanes 16.5 ft wide. The allotments all have 40 ft frontages by depths averaging about 120 ft, thus affording ample space for good improvements and a plot of garden ground for each. The situation is a most desirable one close to the city boundary but exempt from taxes and enjoying consistent communication with all parts of the city.” The Bishopthorpe leases required all buildings to be constructed either of stone or brick. Other conditions prohibited the erection of more than two dwellings on an allotment and required buildings to face the main roads. No restrictions, however, were placed on the use to which buildings could be put. Corner shops accompanied the development of Bishopthorpe, and became an integral part of domestic retailing, providing basic necessities to customers who lived nearby. An array of retail shops stretched along Glebe Point Road from Broadway to St Johns Road, and within these estates could be found bakeries, blacksmith’s shops, iron foundries, Sharp Brothers cordial factory, the Waratah Stove works and Conlon’s pottery in Broughton Street. By the early 1960s many of the leases dating from the subdivisions of the mid-nineteenth century had expired and reverted to the Church. In 1971, the Church decided to sell of these holdings. The estate was purchased by the Commonwealth Government on 12 August 1974. for $17.4 million, 723 properties used as family dwellings and 27 commercial properties. (125 Glebe Estate properties had been sold prior to Commonwealth acquisition. )

Aysleigh House at 144a St Johns Road was built in 1895-6. The name Aysleigh House appears at the first listing of 1896. At that time the property is owned and first occupied by Thomas Nosworthy.

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Residential-

Assessment of significance

SHR Criteria a)
[Historical significance]
The site provides evidence of the Bishopthorpe Estate, subdivided in 1856. The building has historical significance for its ability to evidence the consolidation of the Bishopthorpe Estate in the late 19th century.
SHR Criteria c)
[Aesthetic significance]
A large late-Italianate style house in a garden setting which together with the other substantial buildings on St Johns Road enhances the civic character of this part of Glebe. The house is of unusual massing and makes an important contribution to the streetscape. The unusual design of its cast iron balustrading is notable.
SHR Criteria f)
[Rarity]
A rare example of an intact turn of the century gentlemens residence built on the Bishopthorpe Estate.
SHR Criteria g)
[Representativeness]
An outstanding example of an Italianate house in a Victorian streetscape that is of high integrity.
Integrity/Intactness: High
Assessment criteria: Items are assessed against the PDF State Heritage Register (SHR) Criteria to determine the level of significance. Refer to the Listings below for the level of statutory protection.

Recommended management:

The building should be included in the Heritage Schedule of the LEP and should be adequately protected by the Conservation Area Listing. Subdivision should not occur. Consolidation of sites should not occur. The existing use of the site need not continue. Suitable new uses include commercial.

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Local Environmental PlanSydney LEP 2012I81914 Dec 12   
Heritage study     

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
WrittenAnita Heiss Aboriginal People and Place, Barani: Indigenous History of Sydney City
WrittenBerchervaise & Associates Pty Ltd1991Glebe Point Road Main Street Study, Stage Two

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

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Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Local Government
Database number: 2421107


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