Toogood and White's Estate Heritage Conservation Area | NSW Environment & Heritage

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Heritage

Toogood and White's Estate Heritage Conservation Area

Item details

Name of item: Toogood and White's Estate Heritage Conservation Area
Type of item: Built
Group/Collection: Urban Area
Category: Other - Urban Area
Primary address: , Erskineville ( Refer To Map), NSW 2043
Parish: Petersham
County: Cumberland
Local govt. area: Sydney

Boundary:

Erskinville Rd, the western escarpment of the railway lines, Victoria St, southern boundaries of No. 101 Rochford St and No. 114 Union St and Union St. It is proposed to delete 122-144 Union Street and 97-101 Rochford Street and instead incorporate them into CA22 (Former Macdonaltown Estate Conservation Area)
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
 Erskineville ( Refer To Map)SydneyPetershamCumberlandPrimary Address

Statement of significance:

The heritage conservation area is representative of early land grants, their subdivision and subsequent rapid growth into a working class, corner store community within the Devine Estate. The area is distinguished by generally small lots and a lack of rear laneways, leading to prevalence of semi-detached residences or terraces with pedestrian accessways to the rear of sites. The area's development also illustrates the insertion of local small scale industries in working class terrace housing suburbs, following the "slum clearance" inquiries after the 1901 bubonic plague outbreak in The Rocks, which were encouraged by municipal authorities and state governments in the first half of the 20th century. The area contains quality streetscapes and a built form that gently responds to the undulating topography. The area has a continuous local residential focus that has survived since the 1880s.

(sourced from 1999 Conservation Area Review by Architectural Projects)
Date significance updated: 03 Nov 06
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Physical description: The area is defined by long narrow streets running south from Erskineville Road, with predominantly late 19th century Victorian brick terraces and semi-detached, and early 20th century small scale housing, a mix of one and two storeys, with a prevalence of 1 storey housing, and some small scale industry. Few cross streets (Lambert Street, Munni Street) and a general lack of rear lanes (the only laneways are Turtle Lane and Toogood Lane).

Much of the small-scale industry has been replaced in the late 20th century with modern "infill" terrace housing.
STREET RATINGS

Erskineville Lane (off George St)
Primary a narrow service lane serving shops fronting Erskineville Road, this dead-end section of lane has a purely utilitarian nature. No street trees. Street Rating: B


Erskineville Road, Swanson Street (Southern sides)
This section of the street has an inconsistent character and a range of differing styles, including evidence of Victorian terraces having been converted to shops. It does however contain significant Inter-War buildings listed as heritage items (examples: Imperial Hotel, Rose of Australia Hotel) whose context should be respected and responded to. The street maintains a local community focus which should be maintained and enhanced through the restoration of contributory buildings and new development that is modest in style and scale. New development on corner sites should also respond to the moderate scale of surrounding development and enhance visual opportunities down linear streets. The pedestrian environment and open space should be enhanced to provide rest area and meeting place opportunities. (see Erskineville Road Concept Plan). Street Rating: B

George Street
The street is characterised by Victorian and Federation terraces whose context should be responded to and preserved, however there are a number of modern residential infill developments. New development should focus on the removal of detracting elements and creating a more harmonious streetscape. Assessment should be mostly focused on urban design issues, however should relate to contributory buildings. The heritage item at No. 134, a large Federation Queen Anne style mansion, is atypical of the area.
Rating: B

Lambert Street
A wide street of predominantly Victorian character, which is relatively intact. The street is a good example of the area’s development before the turn of the century. Predominantly two storeys on the northern side and a mixture of single and two storeys on the south. New works should focus on reinstating balconies and verandahs and restoring original features. The construction of dormer windows is inappropriate and to be discouraged. There should be encouragement to improve the appearance of the detracting development at No. 24A Lambert St.
Rating: A

Morrissey Road
A mix of brick and weatherboard one and two storey Victorian terraces, and 2 storey modern residential infill development, the street is inconsistent in character and its heritage value has been diminished to an extent. The street contains numerous single storey Victorian terraces whose heritage value is impaired by two and three storeys unsympathetic modern development. New development should focus on the removal of detracting elements and creating a more harmonious streetscape. Assessment should be mostly focused on urban design issues. Dormer windows may be appropriate and can be considered on merit.
Rating: C

Prospect Street
A street of inconsistent character, that contains an important group of surviving weatherboard and rendered brick Victorian terraces at its southern end whose context should be responded to and preserved. Predominantly single storey development, particular attention should be paid to scale and mass of new developments and additions. New development should focus on the removal of detracting elements and creating a more harmonious streetscape. Assessment should be mostly focused on urban design issues. First floor additions at the rear of properties facing Morrissey Road are to be discouraged.
Rating: C

Rochford Street
A street of predominantly Victorian character, whose context has been largely preserved. The street has a cohesive streetscape and contains little intrusive contemporary development. Predominantly single storey, special attention should be paid to scale and mass on redevelopment sites or where additions are proposed. New work should focus on reinstating verandahs and other original elements. Verandah roofs should be concave where appropriate. Sections of sandstone kerbing are present and should be maintained with missing sections rebuilt.
Rating: A

Toogood Lane (off Union Street)
Narrow service lane servicing shops fronting Erskineville Road, with entry defined by rear of The Imperial Hotel to the north and a 19th century former retail building (possibly a bakery) on the south. No street trees. Street rating: A

Turtle Lane (off Victoria Street)
A narrow "T" shaped lane, predominantly a terrace housing laneway, but also containing an industrial building at No. 32A on the junction of the two sections of the lane. No street trees. Street rating: A


Union Street
A street of predominantly Victorian character with a varied built form. Restoration of contributory buildings should be encouraged. New work should focus on reinstating verandahs and other original elements. New development should focus on the removal of detracting elements and creating a more harmonious streetscape.
Rating: A

Victoria Street (no. 2-16)
This section of the street contains a group of single storey Federation semi-detached houses. The group remains relatively intact and have a high conservation value and are representative of the areas development in the early 1900s. First floor additions and dormer windows are to be discouraged and face brick should remain unpainted.
Rating: A

Victoria Street

(sourced from 1999 Conservation Area Review by Street Review)
Further information: The conservation area was previously listed under South Sydney LEP 1998, Amendment No 3 gazetted on 28/7/2000. (CA 48).

Heritage Inventory sheets are often not comprehensive, and should be regarded as a general guide only. Inventory sheets are based on information available, and often do not include the social history of sites and buildings. Inventory sheets are constantly updated by the City as further information becomes available. An inventory sheet with little information may simply indicate that there has been no building work done to the item recently: it does not mean that items are not significant. Further research is always recommended as part of preparation of development proposals for heritage items, and is necessary in preparation of Heritage Impact Assessments and Conservation Management Plans, so that the significance of heritage items can be fully assessed prior to submitting development applications.

History

Historical notes: The "Eora people" was the name given to the coastal Aborigines around Sydney. Central Sydney is therefore often referred to as "Eora Country". Within the City of Sydney local government area, the traditional owners are the Cadigal and Wangal bands of the Eora. There is no written record of the name of the language spoken and currently there are debates as whether the coastal peoples spoke a separate language "Eora" or whether this was actually a dialect of the Dharug language. Remnant bushland in places like Blackwattle Bay retain elements of traditional plant, bird and animal life, including fish and rock oysters.

With the invasion of the Sydney region, the Cadigal and Wangal people were decimated but there are descendants still living in Sydney today. All cities include many immigrants in their population. Aboriginal people from across the state have been attracted to suburbs such as Pyrmont, Balmain, Rozelle, Glebe and Redfern since the 1930s. Changes in government legislation in the 1960s provided freedom of movement enabling more Aboriginal people to choose to live in Sydney.

(Information sourced from Anita Heiss, "Aboriginal People and Place", Barani: Indigenous History of Sydney City http://www.cityofsydney.nsw.gov.au/barani )

The conservation area is predominantly residential with elements of light industrial and commercial development. Part of the Devine Estate (1799) it was first utilised as a farm and divided into villa estates in the 1830s. During the 1880s with the expansion of the railways, the area experienced rapid growth and was divided into the subdivision pattern that is predominant today. By 1900 a middle and working class suburb had been established around small scale local industries. Development of the area continued with the turn of the century overlays of Federation terraces up to the 1920s and Inter-War development up to the 1940s. Modern infill and site redevelopment has occurred in the form of townhouses and residential flat buildings.

(sourced from 1999 Conservation Area Review by Street Review)

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. (none)-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal (none)-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Living in the City-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Development-

Assessment of significance

SHR Criteria a)
[Historical significance]
The conservation area is representative of early land grants, their subdivision and subsequent rapid growth into a working class, corner store community within the Devine Estate. The area's development also illustrates the insertion of local small scale industries in working class terrace housing suburbs, following "slum clearance" inquiries after the 1901 bubonic plague outbreak in The Rocks, which were encouraged by municipal authorities and state governments in the first half of the 20th century. The area has a continuous local residential focus that has survived since the 1880s.
SHR Criteria c)
[Aesthetic significance]
The area contains quality streetscapes and a built form that gently responds to the undulating topography.
SHR Criteria g)
[Representativeness]
Representative of working class industrial housing of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, and of early land grants and their early subdivision.
Integrity/Intactness: Many of the small industrial sites have been redeveloped in the late 20th century with modern "infill" terrace housing.
Assessment criteria: Items are assessed against the PDF State Heritage Register (SHR) Criteria to determine the level of significance. Refer to the Listings below for the level of statutory protection.

Recommended management:

POLICY RECOMMENDATIONS (Generic Conservation Area policies) 1.Protection of Significance (a) Subdivision -Retain Victorian / Federation subdivision - Do not allow amalgamation of sites (b) Key Period Significant (Contributory) Development: - Retain one storey Victorian / Federation terraces - Retain two storey Victorian/Federation terraces - Retain Victorian / Federation Public Buildings - Retain Victorian / Federation/Inter - war retail/commercial buildings - Retain Victorian corner shops and encourage restoration - Retain small scale of early development Maintain characteristic building alignments - Retain form - Retain finishes and details - Reinstate verandahs, balconies, front cast iron palisade or picket front fences, lost detail Protect intact rear lanes (Toogood Lane, Turtle Lane, Erskineville Lane) - Retain stable buildings, access ways and carriageways of moderate and high integrity - Additions to rear not to exceed ridge height and retain original roof form - Discourage front dormers except where already present in a terrace row - Encourage reinstatement of roofing materials and roofing detail lost in 1999 Sydney hailstorm, particularly original roof profiles for verandah and balcony roofs. c) Retail Development - Erskineville Road/Swanson Street - Protect and reveal the retail history of the street - Maintain landscape components - Reveal original fabric. Remove non original features, particularly if they conceal original detail. - Restore detail to evidence - Reconstruct new shop fronts modeled on surviving original shop fronts in the street and derived from on-site evidence. In particular original splayed recessed entrances. - Retain shop fronts prior to 1910 (generally timber) incorporating splayed recessed entrances; - Retain shop fronts c.1910-19 (generally incorporate use of tiles and metal shop fittings). - Coordinate signage - Discourage large retail chains - Encourage appropriate retail anchor - Coordinate and promote retail precincts - Avoid loss of original significant shop fronts 2. Redevelopment of Non Contributing Sites - encourage interpretation of Victorian subdivision pattern - respect scale and form of contributory development - respect building line of contributory development - encourage rendered and painted finishes - encourage contemporary detail - provide landscape screening/softening - Recognise the collective precedent and impact of the proposal - Develop approach for sympathetic new development to enhance existing heritage character and level of detail - Respect scale and form of contributory development - Avoid flat reflective monotonous glazed façades - Avoid visual clutter: A/C, signs - Encourage sympathetic redevelopment of neutral sites in Erskineville Road 3. Enhance Significance of conservation area - Maintain and enhance street planting to unify streetscape - Encourage redevelopment of detracting sites - Encourage render/paint finishes to detracting developments - Interpret Victorian street pattern and subdivision - Provide landscape screening/softening to detracting sites - Remove/Discourage reproduction of Victorian detail in contemporary development 4. Car Parking - do not allow car parking access from the stet except for large infill development sites where there is no opportunity for side or rear lane access; - Generally allow parking access from rear lanes where possible (Toogood Lane, Turtle Lane). - Reduce impact of existing car parking access from street 5. Landscaping - Encourage trees at the end of streets to reinforce landscape vistas and frame views - Encourage trees to screen detracting development 6. View Protection - Reinforce street end vistas with street trees - Encourage and develop appropriate distant vistas 7. Boundary Adjustment Adjust boundary to exclude properties on the southern side of Victoria Street, which should be included in the Former Macdonaldtown Heritage Conservation Area instead. 8. Heritage Items Protect listed Heritage Items within the heritage conservation area

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Local Environmental PlanSydney LEP 2012C2614 Dec 12   
Heritage study     

Study details

TitleYearNumberAuthorInspected byGuidelines used
Glebe Conservation Area Study2007 Architectural Projects  Yes

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
WrittenAnita Heiss Aboriginal People and Place, Barani: Indigenous History of Sydney City

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

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Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Local Government
Database number: 2421502
File number: S047440


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