Terrace Group "Brucedale" and "Douglasdale" Including Interiors And Front Fencin | NSW Environment, Energy and Science

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Terrace Group "Brucedale" and "Douglasdale" Including Interiors And Front Fencin

Item details

Name of item: Terrace Group "Brucedale" and "Douglasdale" Including Interiors And Front Fencin
Other name/s: 'Brucedale' (No 425); 'Douglasdale' (No 427); 'Stanley/Allandale' (No 429)
Type of item: Complex / Group
Group/Collection: Residential buildings (private)
Category: Terrace
Primary address: 425-427 Glebe Point Road, Glebe, NSW 2037
Local govt. area: Sydney
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
425-427 Glebe Point RoadGlebeSydney  Primary Address

Statement of significance:

No's 425-427: An elaborate pair of late Victorian terrace houses with high integrity.The building is a quality example of a highly intact residential exterior. The building is significant for its contribution to the precinct.The site and building provides evidence of the Guildford Lodge Estate..The building has historical significance for its ability to evidence late Victorian terrace development. The building's quality reflect the development of Glebe Point Road as a prestige address.

No 429: A transitional Victorian/Federation terrace that has been altered, and suffers from the scale of development adjoining. The building and site evidence the subdivision and development of the Guildford Lodge Estate.
Date significance updated: 13 Feb 09
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Construction years: 1886-1900
Physical description: No's 425-427: A two-storey attached pair of terraces that date from the Victorian period within the key period of significance, set on a wide site that has retained its context. The building is setback from the street. The site has an appropriate front fence of iron palisade approximately 1.4 metres high. The front garden is small and provides an appropriate setting for the house.The façade presents a complex symmetrical elevation and is constructed of rendered brick with a paint finish. The roof is parapeted with a low pitch. The roof is clad in corrugated sheet metal and features corbelled chimneys. The verandah runs across the façade, has a straight profile and features cast iron columns and balustrading. The façade features classical motifs, corbelled string course, heavily moulded decorative parapet, brackets and pilaster. The front door is offset/recessed and is 4-panelled. Fenestration comprises vertically proportioned French doors to first floor and double hung timber windows to ground floor.The building appears to be in excellent condition and is highly intact. The building has a medium archaeological potential.

No 429: A two-storey attached terrace that is part of a group that dates from the turn of the century within the key period of significance, set on a wide site that has retained its context. The building is setback from the street. The site has a appropriate front fence of iron palisade approximately 1.4 metres high. The front garden is small and provides an appropriate setting for the house.The façade presents a simple asymmetrical elevation and is constructed of rendered brick with a paint finish on a base course. The roof is hipped and has close eaves. The roof is clad in terracotta tile and features corbelled chimneys. The verandah runs across the facade and has a straight profile. It features cast iron columns, brackets and fringe. The front door is offset/recessed. Fenestration comprises vertically proportioned double hung timber windows.The building appears to be in good condition and has been altered. Alterations include veranda infill. The building has a medium archaeological potential.
Further information: Under the provisions of Leichardt LEP 2000, the buildings at Nos 425-429 Glebe Point Road were listed under one heritage group listing sheet. Due to its integrity level, No 429 is not longer listed in the Sydney LEP 2012.

Heritage Inventory sheets are often not comprehensive, and should be regarded as a general guide only. Inventory sheets are based on information available, and often do not include the social history of sites and buildings. Inventory sheets are constantly updated by the City as further information becomes available. An inventory sheet with little information may simply indicate that there has been no building work done to the item recently: it does not mean that items are not significant. Further research is always recommended as part of preparation of development proposals for heritage items, and is necessary in preparation of Heritage Impact Assessments and Conservation Management Plans, so that the significance of heritage items can be fully assessed prior to submitting development applications.
Current use: Residential

History

Historical notes: The "Eora people" was the name given to the coastal Aborigines around Sydney. Central Sydney is therefore often referred to as "Eora Country". Within the City of Sydney local government area, the traditional owners are the Cadigal and Wangal bands of the Eora. There is no written record of the name of the language spoken and currently there are debates as whether the coastal peoples spoke a separate language "Eora" or whether this was actually a dialect of the Dharug language. Remnant bushland in places like Blackwattle Bay retain elements of traditional plant, bird and animal life, including fish and rock oysters.

With the invasion of the Sydney region, the Cadigal and Wangal people were decimated but there are descendants still living in Sydney today. All cities include many immigrants in their population. Aboriginal people from across the state have been attracted to suburbs such as Pyrmont, Balmain, Rozelle, Glebe and Redfern since the 1930s. Changes in government legislation in the 1960s provided freedom of movement enabling more Aboriginal people to choose to live in Sydney.

(Information sourced from Anita Heiss, "Aboriginal People and Place", Barani: Indigenous History of Sydney City http://www.cityofsydney.nsw.gov.au/barani )

The 1828 subdivision made allowance for in roads into the Glebe; Bay Road and Glebe Road (Glebe Point Road) were created by cutting through bush, pulling out stumps and ‘filling in the largest of the holes’. Glebe Point Rd, or alternatively known as the Glebe Rd, opened up in 1829 as the initial exploitive action in the form of a tract with fence either side. This basic line of communication cut into the then dense forest covering the Glebe with only bush tracks made by drays penetrating off the Glebe Rd to the individual estates.

Alexander Brodie Spark, a leader in shipping and commerce, and a director of the Bank of Australia had purchased Lot 7 from the Trustees of Clergy and School Lands, giving him twenty acres in Glebe Point waterfront. He also obtained another twenty acres when he acquired the deeds of Lot 1, originally purchased by T.C. Harrington. The two altogether gave Spark the enormous advantage of ownership of the whole of the Glebe Point harbour frontage. Spark was also the owner of John Verge’s ‘Tusculum’ at Potts Point, and he lived at ‘Tempe’ on the then beautiful Cook’s River. His home was another example of John Verge’s tasteful and restrained architecture. Spark fell victim to the economic downturn of the 1840’s, and sold his Glebe Point holdings. On June 16, 1841 an advertisement for the Eglinton Estate (west of Glebe Point Road) appeared in the Herald: ‘The Marine Village of Eglinton; Subdivided by Mr. Surveyor Armstrong’. "The road (Glebe Point Road) (opposite that leading to Cook’s River) which has just been completed affords one of the most delightful drives in the vicinity of Sydney, passing along the beautiful properties of Dr. Bowman, Capt. Dumaresq, Messrs. Allen, Betts, Miller, James, etc. The whole property has been divided into convenient allotments, as may have been seen by the surveyors chart on which the enchanting views of the distant "Capes and Bays and rising Villas" are tastefully delineated. Access to Eglinton may be had either by water or land and there is excellent fishing in the adjacent Bays. A public wharf adjoins the village, thus affording the means of supplying the inhabitants of Glebe Island with building timber, lime, fuel, etc. at a cheap rate. Land is of rising value and that it bids fair to well the land at Darlinghurst in value and importance." As Sydney’s first villa suburb was rising on Darlinghurst Hill, a number of professional gentlemen choose to build villas upon the larger elevated allotments in the northern part of the Glebe. Guildford Lodge (c. 1842), and The Retreat (c. 1858) were constructed on Sparks Lot 1, later purchased by Mary Chisholm. Mary Chisholm subdivided Glebe Point in 1853.

A main influencing factor on the character of the subdivided areas of Toxteth Park Estate was the covenant, issued on the death of George Allen, in that being a devout Wesleyan no alcohol was to be brought on to the estate in the form of Hotel or Inn development, no commercial development, and that any building be constructed out of brick of stone or both. As a consequence of the covenants, the Glebe Point end as it became known was a very desirable and fashionable part of Sydney to live in, with some large houses being built along the Glebe Point Road around the turn of the century. These mainly belonged to a higher socio-economic group than would be found in the Church lands or other speculative pockets of the Glebe.

425 and 427 Glebe Point Road were first listed in the Sands Directory of 1889 and occupied by Abraham M Hart, chemist (425 Glebe Point Road) and A Bulteau (427 Glebe Point Road). The buildings were then known as ‘Brucedale’ and ‘Douglasdale’ respectively. They were built on a subdivision of Guildford Lodge.

Built on a subdivision of the Guildford Lodge Estate, 429 Glebe Point Road was first listed in the Sands Directory of 1900 and occupied by Mrs AW Ashcroft. The building was then known as ‘Stanley / Allandale’. The upper floor balcony has been infilled.

Assessment of significance

SHR Criteria a)
[Historical significance]
No's 425-427: The site and building provides evidence of the Guildford Lodge Estate..The building has historical significance for its ability to evidence late Victorian terrace development. The building's quality reflect the development of Glebe Point Road as a prestige address.

No 429: The building and site evidence the subdivision and development of the Guildford Lodge Estate.
SHR Criteria c)
[Aesthetic significance]
No's 425-427: An elaborate pair of late Victorian terrace houses with high integrity.The building is a quality example of a highly intact residential exterior. The building is significant for its contribution to the precinct.

No 429: A transitional Victorian/Federation terrace that has been altered, and suffers from the scale of development adjoining.
SHR Criteria g)
[Representativeness]
No's 425-427: Representative of high quality residential development at Glebe Point in the late Nineteenth Century.

No 429: This item is representative of an altered Federation period terrace house.
Integrity/Intactness: No's 425-427: High

No 429: Low
Assessment criteria: Items are assessed against the PDF State Heritage Register (SHR) Criteria to determine the level of significance. Refer to the Listings below for the level of statutory protection.

Recommended management:

The building should be included in the Heritage Schedule of the LEP and should be protected by the Conservation Area Listing.Continued maintenance, restoration and reinstatement of missing original elements is recommended for this residential frontage.

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Local Environmental PlanSydney LEP 2012I77214 Dec 12   
Heritage study     

Study details

TitleYearNumberAuthorInspected byGuidelines used
Statement of Heritage Significance & Statement of Heritage Impact2019 Nigel Parsons & Associates Architects  No

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
WrittenAnita Heiss Aboriginal People and Place, Barani: Indigenous History of Sydney City

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

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Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Local Government
Database number: 2427793


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