Friend In Hand Hotel including interior | NSW Environment & Heritage

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Friend In Hand Hotel including interior

Item details

Name of item: Friend In Hand Hotel including interior
Type of item: Built
Group/Collection: Commercial
Category: Hotel
Primary address: 58 Cowper Street, Glebe, NSW 2037
Local govt. area: Sydney
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
58 Cowper StreetGlebeSydney  Primary Address
Queen StreetGlebeSydney  Alternate Address

Statement of significance:

The Friend in Hand Hotel, 58 Cowper Street, Glebe, has local historic significance as part of a long standing pattern of Glebe hotels, inns and pubs. Constructed c.1937, the existing building is the second of two hotels on this site, the first, also known as the Friend in Hand Hotel, being constructed prior to 1858. The hotel continues to form an important part of a distinctive close knit pattern of local community.

The Friend in Hand Hotel has historic significance for its long association (c.1929-1980) with Tooths & Co, one of Sydney’s major breweries. Tooths & Co. dominated the Glebe liquor trade during the late nineteenth century and first part of the twentieth century. The hotel was one of many owned and or rebuilt by Tooths & Co. within the wider metropolitan area during the interwar period; it is indicative of the standard of building constructed by the brewery at this time. The Friend in Hand Hotel has historic significance for its association with the architect R.M. Joy, who designed other hotels for Tooths & Co.

The Friend in Hand Hotel has local aesthetic significance as an important element in the immediate streetscape. Stylistically, it relates well to a number of inter-war period residences in the immediate area. The hotel has significance as a fine, if modest, example of an Inter-war Functionalist Style building with Art Deco overtones; it is one of small group of hotels in this style in the inner city suburbs. The building displays a high and rare level of intactness and retains its original main bar.
Date significance updated: 22 Jan 16
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Designer/Maker: R.M. Joy (architect) for Tooths & Co.
Builder/Maker: S. A. Bennell (builder)
Physical description: Surrounding area: one and two storey nineteenth century terraces, mostly modest in size and detailing. Along nearby Broughton Street there is a line of modest interwar detached dwellings that relate well to the Friend in Hand Hotel. The hotel also relates to a two storey inter- war dwelling on the opposite side of Cowper Street.

Exterior: Two storey Inter-war Functionalist style brick face brick building on the south eastern corner of Cowper and Queen Streets. Principal elevations are of cream brick; side and rear elevations are of common brick. The ground floor of the Cowper and Queen Street elevations are finished in glazed tiles (black to base; yellow to middle with green banding; mustard to top). There are timber and glass doors at regular intervals along the two street elevations. The ground floor is shaded by a wide suspended awning. The first floor continues into a raised parapet (slightly higher to the corner) that conceals the roof form from the streets. Regularly spaced double hung timber windows are set within bands of contrasting brickwork.

Interior: Not examined. The main bar area (ground floor) would appear to be largely intact.
Physical condition and/or
Archaeological potential:
Good
Date condition updated:24 Jul 06
Modifications and dates: From Tooth & Co. Company Records: (in addition to replacement of e.g. refrigeration equipment, internal/external painting and repairs)
- Tiles in entrance hall, ladies parlour and serving space behind Public Bar (1956).
- Alteration and additions to value of £5,265 (1963).
- Renovation of portion of exterior to the value of $454 (1966).
- Alterations and additions to public bar counter, value $590 (1968).

Council Records (in addition to the above):
- Alterations to snack bar (1985).
- Alterations to hotel bottle shop (1986).
- Alterations to dining area (1992).
- Refurbishment of first floor (1994).
Further information: The building was first listed as a heritage item under the provisions ot LEP 2012 which was gazetted on 14/12/2012.
Current use: Hotel
Former use: Hotel

History

Historical notes: This site forms part of the land of the Gadigal people, the traditional custodians of land within the City of Sydney council boundaries. For information about the Aboriginal history of the local area see the City’s Barani website: http://www.sydneybarani.com.au/

Modern day Glebe was once occupied by the Cadigal people, whose territory extended from Sydney Cove to the southern side of Port Jackson and south to modern day Petersham.

The subject property lies on the 400 acre grant known as The Glebe, land set aside by Governor Phillip in 1789 ‘for the maintenance of a minister’. The income derived from this lands was intended to sustain the Church, then in the person of the first minister to be appointed to the Colony, the Reverend Richard Johnson. The Glebe remained heavily timbered and largely unoccupied until subdivided in 1828 by the body then responsible for the Glebe lands, the Church and School Corporation. All but 3 of the 28 allotments created were subsequently sold. Allotments on high ground were typically developed into villa estates; those close to Blackwattle Bay were used by noxious industries, most notably slaughter houses. The line of Glebe Point Road was laid out at this time. The road, would, however, remain little more than a rough track for sometime to come. Cowper Street was most likely named for the Reverend W.M. Cowper the first incumbent of the Parish of Glebe (appointed 1856).

The allotment on which the hotel now stands would not appear to have been sold at the 1828 land sales. Glebe Municipal Rate Records for the Outer Ward, however, indicate that the land had been sold by 1859, at which time it was owned by Michael Delohenty.

The rate records for 1859 are the first available for Glebe. By this time, a hotel stood on the subject site. This building, known as the Friend in Hand, was described in this year as a two storey brick and slate ‘public house’ of six rooms. The hotel had appeared in the first published John Sands Suburban Directory of 1858. It can thus be stated that a hotel has stood on this site from at least 1858. Delohenty remained at the Friend in Hand until around 1876. Mrs. H. Delohenty is listed as the owner of the hotel by the rate records of 1896; the occupiers by this time, however, were Smyth and Andrews. Local hotels would play a vital role in the social and commercial worlds of Glebe throughout of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. By 1891, there would be one hotel for every 610 people in the municipality.

The first available foot print for the building on the site is provided by the Sydney Metropolitan Detail Series Plan of 1889 (Figure 1 in images). The original hotel did not quite stand on the corner of Cowper and Queen Streets; to Queen Street there was land and sheds. These structures were still standing when the property was assessed for rates in 1904. A photograph of the nineteenth century hotel building is provided by Figure 2 (in images).

One of Sydney’s largest breweries, Tooth & Co., acquired an interest (and sometime later, the freehold) for the Friend in Hand Hotel around 1921. Tooth & Co. had been founded in 1835 by John Tooth and his brother-in-law Charles Newman. The Company remained a separate entity (with the addition of Resches in 1929) until acquired by Carlton and United Breweries in 1983. The hotel was operated by subleases or managed by a licensee for the Company and remained in their ownership until at least the late 1970s.

The Friend in Hand was one of numerous hotels that Tooths & Co. owned or leased in the Sydney area. Between 1898 and 1940, the company and their rival, Tooheys, acquired the freeholds of hundreds of pubs, largely taking control of the liquor trade in Sydney. During the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries Tooths & Co. dominated the liquor trade in Glebe and Newtown, while Balmain was a stronghold of Tooheys. During this period, Tooths gained control of 16 pubs in Balmain, 9 in Glebe and 2 each in Annandale and Leichhardt.

A Tooths & Co. Report dated 3 April, 1935 described the Friend in Hand Hotel as an

‘.. old two storey building of poor appearance….The Hotel contains a small Public Bar with three Parlours.. The building is badly planned. .. There is no Private entrance ...The whole place is obsolete and should have been condemned years ago.

In the event of the Company purchasing the property, it would be necessary to re-build, and to re-build on a larger site. Either the whole block should be purchased with the Hotel, or another site purchased with a view to the removal of the license.’

A ground floor plan of this building is available among Tooth & Co. records held by the NBAC, ANU.

Tooths & Co. would appear to have acquired the site and adjoining land to Queen Street soon after. Plans for a new hotel, prepared by architect R.M. Joy, were submitted to Council in 1936, details of which are provided by Figures 3, 4 and 5 (in images). The tender of S.A. Benell for £5,100 was accepted for the ‘rebuilding’ in September 1936. The exact date of completion is not known. A photograph dated 23 July, 1937, however, shows the completed, at least externally, building (Figure 6 in images).

The Friend in Hand is one of a small number of Sydney hotels built in the Interwar Functionalist Style. The building is made further indicative of the period through the use of Art Deco overtones. The hotel is modest in comparison to the best Sydney examples of this style, The Australian and The Civic.

Tooths & Co. records provide the names of the various publicans for the period 1921 to 1978.

Company records of the 1970s describe the surrounding area as ‘partly residential’ (poor class) with light industry.’

The hotel was photographed regularly for Tooths & Co. records (Figures 7, 8 and 9 in images). There would appear to have been no major external alterations involving the street facing elevations.

The Friend in Hand Hotel continues to be an important local meeting place.

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Community facilities-
5. Working-Working Labour-Activities associated with work practises and organised and unorganised labour (none)-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. (none)-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation (none)-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups (none)-

Assessment of significance

SHR Criteria a)
[Historical significance]
The Friend in Hand Hotel, Glebe, has local significance under this criterion as part of a long standing pattern of Glebe hotels, inns and pubs. The existing building (c.1937) is the second of two hotels to have stood on this site, the first, also known as the Friend in Hand Hotel, being constructed prior to 1858. The hotel formed (and continues to form) part of an important, close knit pattern of local community.
SHR Criteria b)
[Associative significance]
The Friend in Hand Hotel has significance for its long association (c.1929-1980) with Tooths & Co, one of Sydney’s major breweries. The Company dominated the Glebe liquor trade. The hotel was one of many owned by Tooths & Co. within the Sydney metropolitan area and is among a number of hotels rebuilt by the company during the interwar period.

The Friend in Hand Hotel has significance under this criterion for its association with the architect R.M. Joy.
SHR Criteria c)
[Aesthetic significance]
The Friend in Hand Hotel has local aesthetic significance. Located on the corner of Cowper and Queen Streets, the building is an important element in the immediate streetscape. The hotel has significance as a fine, if modest, example of an Inter-war Functionalist Style building with Art Deco overtones. The building (externally) is substantially intact and would appear to retain its original main bar. In style, the hotel relates well to the line of modest inter-war detached dwellings on nearby Broughton Street.
SHR Criteria d)
[Social significance]
Local hotels of long standing possess social significance as meeting places of long standing. This is particularly clear for the Friend in Hand Hotel.
SHR Criteria e)
[Research potential]
The Friend in Hand Hotel has significance under this criterion as an example of the Inter-War Functionalist style building with Art Deco overtones.
SHR Criteria f)
[Rarity]
The Friend in Hand Hotel is one of a number of interwar hotels in the Interwar Functionalist Style to survive in the city area. It is one of a number of surviving hotels built by Tooths & Co. during the interwar period. The high level of intactness displayed by the main bar area, however, is rare.
SHR Criteria g)
[Representativeness]
The Friend in Hand Hotel has significance as a substantially intact (externally, at least) example of a interwar period hotel built in the Inter-war Functionalist Style with Art Deco overtones.
Integrity/Intactness: Externally, the Friend in Hand Hotel displays a high degree of integrity. The existing structure corresponds closely to the original drawings and early photographs of the building.While not examined internally, it would appear from Council records that internal alterations have occurred over time. The main bar area, however, would appear to be largely intact.
Assessment criteria: Items are assessed against the PDF State Heritage Register (SHR) Criteria to determine the level of significance. Refer to the Listings below for the level of statutory protection.

Recommended management:

The Friend in Hand Hotel, Glebe, is a fine, if modest, example of an Inter-war Functionalist Style hotel which displays a high and rare degree of intactness, considerable streetscape presence and which continues to be a popular local meeting place, that should be retained and conserved. A Heritage Assessment and Heritage Impact Statement, or a Conservation Management Plan, should be prepared for the building prior to any major works being undertaken. There shall be no vertical additions to the building and no alterations to the façade of the building other than to reinstate original features. The principal room layout and planning configuration as well as significant internal original features including ceilings, cornices, timber joinery, flooring, fireplaces, and original stairs, should be retained and conserved. Any additions and alterations should be confined to the rear in areas of less significance, should not be visibly prominent and shall be in accordance with the relevant planning controls.

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Local Environmental PlanSydney LEP 2012I67114 Dec 12   
Heritage studyWeir + Phillips Review of Potential Heritage Items    

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
Written  Glebe Municipality Rate Records: Outer Ward
GraphicJoy, R.M.1936The Friend in Hand Hotel. New Premises
WrittenTooth & Co. Tooth & Co. Company Records: Yellow Series: Friend in Hand Hotel

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

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Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Local Government
Database number: 2431102


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