Terrace Group Including Interiors | NSW Environment & Heritage

Culture and heritage

Heritage

Terrace Group Including Interiors

Item details

Name of item: Terrace Group Including Interiors
Type of item: Built
Group/Collection: Residential buildings (private)
Category: Terrace
Primary address: 12-20 Campbell Street, Haymarket, NSW 2000
Parish: Alexandria
County: Cumberland
Local govt. area: Sydney

Boundary:

The curtilage is the parcels of land on which the buildings at 12-22 Campbell Street are situated.
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
12-20 Campbell StreetHaymarketSydneyAlexandriaCumberlandPrimary Address

Statement of significance:

The terrace buildings on 12-22 Campbell Street are closely associated with the foundation of early markets and intense commercial activities in central Sydney. The existing buildings were constructed in different dates in late Victorian period, but the commercial use of the sites likely dates from the 1850s. The buildings present varied details and finishes which demonstrate the progressive evolution of commercial premises in Haymarket. Building no. 12 and 16 are of Victorian Italianate style and no. 14 and 18-22 are of Federation Free Classic style. Though the ground level shopfronts have been altered, the upper level facades remain intact. These buildings, as a remaining group of commericial terraces on Campbell Street make an important contribution to the townscape of Haymarket.
Date significance updated: 25 Feb 16
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Construction years: 1884-1892
Physical description: A group of three-storey late Victorian commercial terraces next to the former Hay and Corn Market and later the Capitol Theatre. No. 12 and 14 are in the Victorian Italianate style, featuring balustrading parapet, decorative plaster finish and moulding for the window surroundings. The façade of no. 12 is not symmetrical, with only one pillaster on one side. No. 16 has a first level balcony. No. 14 and 18-22 are in Federation Free Classic style, featuring face brickwork, decorative mouldings and parapet motifs. No. 18-22 form a consistent group with uniform facades at upper levels.

12 Campbell Street was most likely part of a terrace row (now demolished) that may or may not have included No. 14 Campbell Street. The terrace, without the remainder of the row, is asymmetrical. The left hand edge of the front elevation is complete with an engaged pier with corbel at first floor level. The right hand side lacks these elements and simply runs into the adjoining terrace. It is difficult to ascertain if the building was originally face brickwork or, as for most Italianate Style terraces, stuccoed. This terrace, constructed in the late 1880s was built at a time when hard machine-made bricks were beginning to be produced in larger quantities. If the former the brickwork has been painted. If the latter, the stucco has been stripped.

14 Campbell Street presents a highly unusual first and second floor elevation to Campbell Street. Once again, there are disparities between the detailing of the left and right hand side of the facades, making it difficult to determine if the terrace was part of a row and/or underwent later alteration. As noted above, it may have been a ‘book end’ to the row. No. 14 Campbell Street does not fit into any strict architectural style. It shows variant characteristics of the Free Classical and Anglo-Dutch revival styles. The parapet, piers at first floor level and stucco detailing are drawn from the classical tradition. The shallow, curving form of the projection hints at the form of the curving Dutch gable. There would appear to be no comparable examples within the City of Sydney. It is possible that the window framing at first and second floor levels is early in date. Closer examination of the fabric would be required to determine this.

16 Campbell Street is a representative and partially intact example of a Late Victorian commercial terrace, with Mannerist and Classical Style influences, but generally in an Italianate style. The original form of the first floor is not clear. The second floor and parapet, however, are highly intact and provide a good example of the Victorian love of ornamentation.

18-22 Campbell Street formed part of the vibrant commercial scene that was Haymarket in the Late Victorian and Federation periods, generated by the markets, the railway and the nearby department stores, such as Anthony Horderns. It also has a long and early history of occupation by Chinese businesses. It thus has local historic and possible social significance independent of the architectural assessment below.

18-22 Campbell Street is a fine example of a modest Victorian/ Federation Free Style commercial building of Haymarket. Above awning level it is highly intact. The parapet, however, requires repair. It should also be noted that faint remnants of painted signage survive at first floor level ("rice, tea"). The building is one of a number of buildings within the Haymarket area that demonstrate a similar style (Victorian or Federation Free Classical Style) to the New Belmore Markets, constructed in 1891 and adapted in 1913 to create what is now the Capitol Theatre. The red brickwork, stone (or stucco) and (in this case false) terracotta detailing of this building mirrors a number of buildings designed by the City Architect in the Federation period, including the Capitol Theatre opposite and the outstanding Corporation Building in Hay Street. Whether the stone/stucco detailing of Nos. 18-22 Campbell Street was painted at an early date to resemble the terracotta detailing of these buildings is unknown. The tablets below the window demonstrate the interest of the 1890s (and earlier) in Oriental art. The detailing to the windows themselves reflect the Victorian Italianate influence. The detailing of the parapet shares some similarities with the landmark Victorian Free Classical Style buildings at No. 2-6 Barrack Street (Pinnacle House) and 252 George Street (Pattison House) albeit on a simpler and more modest scale.
Physical condition and/or
Archaeological potential:
The ground level shopfronts have been altered with little original fabric or features left. The first level and second level are intact and timber double hung windows remain.
Date condition updated:11 Jan 11
Modifications and dates: Building Application Street Cards in the City of Sydney Archives record the alterations, additions and changes of use. Some are noted below.

No. 12 Campbell Street

1914: Repair of awning Nos. 2-12 Campbell Street.
1923: Application (unspecified) by Morts Dry Dock Engineering Company for Nos. 8-12 Campbell Street.

No.14 Campbell Street

1980: Construction of fire proof partitions, ceilings and general renovations.
2006: Fit out part of the existing grocery store for sale of packed food and videos.

No. 16 Campbell Street

1912: Application (unspecified).
1912: Application for alterations to shop front, submitted by architects Morrow and De Putron (plan available, 0203/120.
1926: Application for alterations and additions by S. Waterson for No. 16 and 16A Campbell Street.
1927: Application for a shop front by H. and E. Sidgrieves.
1928: Application (unknown).

No. 18 Campbell Street

1921: Two applications (unspecified) by R. Watson.
1922: Application (unspecified) by Catliff and Marshall.
1926: Applications for awnings for Nos. 18, 20 and 22 Campbell Street.
2007: Use of ground floor as Asian grocery, new installation and fit-out.

No. 20 Campbell Street

1917: Application (unspecified).
1922: Application (unspecified) by R. Crooks.
1925: Application (unspecified) by A.J. Westman.
1925: Application (unspecified) for Nos. 20 and 22 Campbell Street by J.J. Bromwich.
1926: Applications for awnings for Nos. 18, 20 and 22 Campbell Street.
2007: Alterations and additions to ground floor and mezzanine for use as licenced restaurant and take away food outlet.

No. 22 Campbell Street

1919: Application (unspecified) by A. Boyd.
1925: Application (unspecified) for Nos. 20 and 22 Campbell Street by J.J. Bromwich.
1926 Application for alterations and addition by B. Callose & Cons.
1926: Applications for awnings for Nos. 18, 20 and 22 Campbell Street.
1926: Application for a shop front by J.H. Dobson.
2005 & 2006: Signs for use of ground floor as convenience store and first floor as a video store.
2007: Use of part of the premise for Chinese massage and therapeutic, use as part Security Office.
Further information: Heritage inventory sheets are often not comprehensive, and should be regarded as a general guide only. Inventory sheets are based on information available, and often do not include the social history of sites and buildings. Inventory sheets are constantly updated by the City as further information becomes available. An inventory sheet with little information may simply indicate that there has been no building work done to the item recently: it does not mean that items are not significant. Further research is always recommended as part of preparation of development proposals for heritage items, and is necessary in preparation of Heritage Impact Assessments and Conservation Management Plans, so that the significance of heritage items can be fully assessed prior to submitting development applications.
Current use: Commercial, retail
Former use: Commercial, retail, hotel, residential

History

Historical notes: Haymarket and street history:

This site forms part of the land of the Gadigal people, the traditional custodians of land within the City of Sydney council boundaries. For information about the Aboriginal history of the local area see the City’s Barani website: http://www.sydneybarani.com.au/

The colonial town of Sydney was established in January 1788. To provide for a well-ordered and healthy township, Governor Phillip issued an order that the main streets were to be a uniform 200 feet wide and building allotments a standard 60 by 150 feet to ‘allow for the proper circulation of air.’ The realisation of Phillip’s plans, however, was dependent on the Crown retaining control of the land. In January 1792, nine days before his departure from the Colony, Phillip established a boundary line that encompassed most of the modern day City of Sydney, within which he ordered that the land be reserved for the Crown and the use of the Town of Sydney.

Phillip’s successors and the colonists paid little heed to his plans for the settlement. In 1797, Governor Hunter frustrated the basic premise of Phillip’s 1792 declaration by allowing the general granting of leaseholds within township boundary. Vested private interests thus played an important role in the development of Sydney’s street pattern from an early date. The lines of the first streets were determined more by use than by regulation. The first discernible track, now George Street, was known initially as the ‘Main Track’ and later as ‘High Street’ and, finally, as George Street. This track ran south from the western bank of the Tank Stream to the ‘Brickfields’, to the south of modern day Liverpool Street, and the first farms located to the west. From the opposite side of the stream a second track, ‘Pitt’s Row’, later Pitt Street, ran in the same direction. Lesueur’s 1802 plan of Sydney marks the presence of ‘Brickfield Village’, near the modern-day Haymarket, where there were the beginnings of manufacturing and the making of pottery, crockery, tiles and bricks.

When Campbell Street was formed is unclear. The street is clearly shown and named on Hoddie, Manner and Mitchell’s Map of the Town of Sydney from 1831. Scattered buildings are marked on the northern side of the street, while the cattle markets, established in 1828, are marked on the southern side of the street. The foundations for more intense commercial activity were laid five years later, when corn and hay markets were established nearby. Campbell Street lay within the boundaries of the City of Sydney as incorporated in 1842. Woolcott and Clarke’s Map of the City of Sydney from 1854 indicates that, by this date, there was a line of buildings fronting Campbell Street between George and Pitt Streets.

It is difficult to identify the subject properties in early Rate and Valuation Records. By 1861, however, this section of the street was occupied by a mix of dwellings, stores and public houses, mostly two-storeys and constructed of brick or stone. The first Belmore Markets opened in 1869 on the opposite side of Campbell Street, on the site of the Capitol Theatre. The markets dominated this section of Campbell Street.

Businesses in the immediate area in the 1870s and 1880s were varied and included blacksmiths, wheelwrights, commission agents, butchers, eating houses and produce merchants. While descriptions are for buildings of brick or stone, not all buildings in this part of Campbell Street were of a high quality. One set of buildings within the subject block, described as ‘off’ Campbell Street, was Blake’s Buildings, a series of six dwellings each containing two rooms. In 1865, the City Health Officer warned the owner, Mrs Blake, of the ‘disgusting state and nature of the premises’ (Town Clerk Letters Received, 26/76/0967). By 1871, there were two hotels within the area of the subject properties; the New Market Hotel and an unnamed hotel. The subject properties comprised this assortment of small commercial and residential premises and hotels until the 1880s.

Significant change came when the ‘New’ Belmore Markets were constructed, opposite the subject site in 1891. The markets, however, were not a success and were removed to a new site to the west of George Street.

By the end of the nineteenth century, the southern end of the City, near the Belmore Markets, was home to the majority of Sydney’s Chinese. The first association of the Haymarket area with the Chinese dates from the early nineteenth century, when market gardeners would bring their produce to the markets, staying in nearby lodging houses. These lodging houses were typically located within the sub-standard housing that lined Goulburn Street and the alleyways leading off Campbell Street. Supporting businesses followed, some of which were branch stores for businesses with main premises elsewhere.

By 1900, the earlier pattern whereby Chinese businesses rented the older, cheaper premises in Haymarket had declined and "even the prime market locations on Campbell Street were being occupied" (Fiztgerald, S., 1996: 89). Early plans and Rate and Valuation Records demonstrate this progression. Dove’s plan of 1880 records one Asian business in this part of Campbell Street, being Hop Hing, grocer, at No. 8 Campbell Street. The valuation record of 1891 records Ty Onn Wong at No. 8 Campbell Street, Yuct Ling at Nos. 26-28, Sim Kum Lee at No. 36, Ah Hum at No. 38, Yee Chin at No. 44, On War Lee at No. 46, You Lee at No. 48 Han Kow & Co. at No. 40, Juen Lee at No. 52 and Song Kee at Nos. 56-58 Campbell Street.

This section of Campbell Street underwent significant change when development consent was granted for Nos. 4-10 Campbell Street for a mixed-use tower development, Stage 1 of which was approved in April 2008. Applications for a tower development on this site date back to the 1980s.

Subject sites and buildings history:

In 1880 Percy Dove’s "A New and Complete Wharf, Street and Building Plan Directory of the City of Sydney" records the footprint and type of buildings on this section of Campbell Street at this time. These included the Haymarket Hotel, a saddler, produce stores and a fruiterer. Significant changes occurred on the subject sites now known as 12-22 Campbell Street after this time, as outlined below.

Nos. 12 and 14 Campbell Street:

Nos. 12 and 14 Campbell Street were constructed between 1882 and 1891. The footprint of these buildings are not shown by the 1887 Metropolitan Detail Series Plan, narrowing the construction date to between 1887 and 1891. The renaming of the Haymarket Hotel to the New Haymarket Hotel in 1888 suggests a construction date of c.1888 for No. 14 Campbell Street.

In 1882 the site now known as No. 12 Campbell Street, then known as No. 10 Campbell Street, was previously occupied by a three-storey brick hotel with shingle roof (marked on Dove’s plan as the Haymarket Hotel), owned by P.R. Larkin and occupied by Richard B. Goff. A notation in the valuation records indicates that this building was ‘pulled down’ in this year or soon after. When next valued in 1891, the hotel had been replaced with a three-storey brick and stone ‘shop’ with an iron roof, comprising five rooms. The site was still owned by P.R. Larkin and the number had changed to No. 12 Campbell Street.

In 1882 the site now known as No. 14 Campbell Street, then known as No. 12 Campbell Street, was previously occupied by a single-storey wooden shop with an iron roof (also owned by P.R. Larkin) and occupied by Thomas Cook. Dove’s plan and Sands’ Directories record his occupation as a saddler. This building is also noted in the 1882 valuation record as being ‘pulled down.’ When next valued in 1891, it had been replaced by a three-storey brick and stone hotel with a slate roof and 16 rooms and the street number had changed to No. 14. The owner remained P.R. Larkin and the occupant was given as James Kelly. The initials of the owner (P.R.L.) can be seen in the parapet of the building. The hotel was known as the New Haymarket Hotel, later as the Nottingham Castle Hotel and finally as the Capitol Hotel.

Physical and historic evidence (see 1913 photograph) suggests that No. 12 Campbell Street was part of a row that extended towards George Street, possibly incorporating Nos. 8-12 Campbell Street. P.R. Larkin owned all these properties between 1882 and 1891. Nos. 8 and 10 were also ‘pulled down’ after 1882. By 1883, Nos. 8-12 were all described as three-storey buildings of a similar size. The remainder of the row has since been demolished. No photographs or plans have been located.

Physical evidence suggests that No. 14 Campbell Street may also have been part of this row. Whether No. 14 was originally detailed the same as its neighbour and later altered, or simply shared similar but not identical, characteristics because it was constructed for the same owner and around the same date, is unknown. Alternatively, the asymmetrical nature of the elevation could suggest that the terrace was a ‘bookend’ to the row. The only early building plan to have survived for No. 14 relates to internal alterations to the ground floor bar (0510/16); no early photographs have been found.

Between 1933 and 1939, the Nottingham Castle Hotel, at No. 14 Campbell Street, became the Capitol Hotel. By 1948, it was one of the many City and suburban hotels owned by Tooth & Co. Hotels and related uses appeared to have ceased around the 1980s.

No. 16 Campbell Street:

In 1882, the site now known as No. 16 Campbell Street, then known as No. 14 Campbell Street, was previously occupied by a single-storey brick shop of three rooms owned and occupied by Michael O’Neill. Dove’s plan records O’Neill's shop as a produce store.

By 1891, O’Neill had rebuilt and now occupied a three-storey brick and stone building described as a ‘store and house’. The date on the parapet of this building is 1884. The building appears on the metropolitan details series plan of 1887. By 1891, the street number had changed in valuation records to No. 16 Campbell Street. It is still marked as No. 14, however, on the Metropolitan Detail Series Plan of 1895. O’Neil (James and later Michael) is a name associated within this block of Campbell Street from an early date. Sands Directories list a James O’Neil at No. 12 Campbell Street at least as early as 1875.

Nos. 18-22 Campbell Street:

In 1882, the site now known as Nos. 18-22 Campbell Street comprised two two storey brick and shingle shops owned by Francis McMahon and occupied by William Moss and W.B. Asprey respectively. They were marked on Dove’s plan as a produce store. Aspery’s shop is noted as being ‘pulled down’ in the Valuation Record of 1882. When McMahon’s property is again rated in 1891, it comprised a single-storey brick and stone shop, occupied by George North, and vacant land.

By 1902, this site was occupied by three-storey brick and iron stores, owned by Samuel Hordern, the well-known Sydney businessman and retailer. The date on the building’s parapet gives a construction date of 1892. The name, O’Neil’s Buildings, strongly indicates that Hordern was not responsible for the construction of the building. O’Neil is possibly Michael O’Neil, owner and occupier of the adjoining building.

Hordern owned and/or occupied a number of buildings in the immediate area at the time. Hordern’s Palace Emporium was located in nearby Goulburn Street. Nos. 18-28A Campbell Street was also associated with the company. Hordern’s, however, did not occupy this building. The first occupant was Wing Sang & Co. Established in 1890: "From trading in Queensland and Fijian bananas in the Haymarket in Sydney, the firm established a department store (Sincere and Company) in Hong King in 1900, using business practices allegedly based on a familiarity with Anthony Hordern’s in Sydney. Branches in Canton and Shanghai followed, and by the 1960s, Wing Sang’s business empire encompassed banking, hotels and other manufacturing enterprises" (Fitzgerald, S., 1996: 48).

By 1909, Wing Sang & Co. had moved to a large warehouse on the corner of Sussex and Hay Street.

By 1912, the Council had decided to reuse the fabric of the 1891 Belmore Markets to create a Hippodrome fronting Parker Street (now the Capitol Theatre) and a coffee palace and eighteen shops fronting Pitt Street (the Manning Building). The architectural character of these buildings (Federation Free Style) was repeated throughout the Haymarket. A photograph taken during this reconstruction work, in December 1913, provides the only historic image of the subject buildings found to date.

Owners and occupants for No 12-22 Campbell Street:

The owners and occupiers of Nos. 12-22 Campbell Street from 1902 until 1948 are documented in the Rate and Valuation Records and the Sands' Directories, as shown below. These record that Nos. 12 and 16 Campbell Street continued to be occupied throughout this period as businesses and dwellings. No. 16 later became ‘residential.’ By 1921, No. 18-20 Campbell Street were occupied by separate businesses. The ownership of these three terraces was split by the 1930s. Notations below of (R) indicate the Rate and Valuation Records as the source record. (S) indicates the Sands' Directories as the source record.

1883 (S):
No.10: Haymarket Hotel
No. 12: Cook, Thomas, saddler
No.14: O’Neil, Michael, produce dealer
No.16: Moss, William, furniture dealer
No.18: Asprey, W.B., & Co., flour and produce dealer

1887/8 (S):
No.10: Haymarket Hotel
No.12: Cook, Thomas, saddler
No.14: O’Neil, Michael
No.16: Christy, Alexander, fishmonger
No.18: Smith, T.R., produce merchant

1889 (S):
No.12: New Haymarket Hotel
No.14: Cook, Thomas, saddler
Michael O’Neil (no numbers given)
No.16: George Norh
No.18: Poyer, Ernest, produce merchant
No.20: blank
No.22: blank

1891(S):
No.12: New Haymarket Hotel
No.14: blank
No's.16-18: O’Neil, Michael, produce merchant
No.20: North, George, butcher
No.22: blank

1895 (S):
No.12: Tiy On Wong & Co
No.14: New Haymarket Hotel
No.16: O’Neil,James
No.18: blank
No.20: Pawn-broker
No.22: Holst, James, butcher, The Boys Brigade

1900 (S):
No.12: Tiy On Wong & Co., grocers
No.14: Nottingham Castle Hotel
No.16: O’Neill, Michael, produce merchant
No.18: Dive, James, fruit merchant
No.20-22: Wing Sang & Co, produce merchants

1902 (R):
No.12: Tiy On Wong (occ.), Patrick R. Larkin (own.), shop, brick, iron, 3/6
No.14: James Lee (occ.), Patrick R. Larkin (own.), hotel, brick, iron, 3/7
No.16: Michael O’Neill (own. and occ.), shop, brick, iron, 3/6
No.20-22: Wee Sang & Co (possibly a spelling mistake, given later entries) (occ), Samuel Hordern (own.), stores, brick, iron, 3/15

1905 (S):
No.12: Tiy On Wong & Co., grocers
No.14: Nottingham Castle Hotel
No.16: Wing Chong & Co, produce merchants
No.20-22: Wing Sang &Co, produce merchants

1910 (S)
No.12: Choy, York, Mrs., grocer
No.14: Nottingham Castle Hotel
No.16: Tiy Sang & Co, fruit and produce
No.20-22: Wing Sang & Co., fruit and produce merchants

1911 (R):
No.12: Choy York (occ), Estate .P.R.Larkin, shop and house, brick, iron 3/5
No.14: James Lees (occ), Estate P. R Larkin, Nottingham Castle Hotel, brick, iron, 3/18
No.16: Ting Sang & Co. (occ), Estate S. Hordern (own), shop and house, brick, iron, 3/7
No.18, 20-22: Wing Sang & Co. (occ), Samuel Hordern (own), shop and house, brick and iron, 3/6

1915 (S):
No.12: Choy, York, Mrs., grocer
No.14: Nottingham Castle Hotel
No.16: Byrnes, Joseph, bootmaker, Hope, William, bath proprietor and lodging house
No.18: Wing Sang Co., fruit proprietor
No.20: blank
No.22: Callose & Sons, general importer

1920 (S):
No.12: Scott Hy, hairdresser and tobacconist
No.14: Nottingham Castle Hotel
No.16: Du Man Lee & Co., mixed business
No.18: Wing Sang & Co., fruit merchants
No.20: Yee Hun, café
No.22: Callose & Sons, general importer

1921 (R):
No.12: Choy York (occ.), Estate. P.R.Larkin (own.), shop and house, brick, iron 3/5
No.14: Stanley A. Robbins (occ), Estate P. R Larkin (own), Nottingham Castle Hotel, brick, iron, 3/15
No.16: Sun Man Lee (own. and occ.), house and shop, brick, iron, 3/6
No.18: Wing Sang Co Ltd (occ)., Estate late Samuel Hordern (own), house and shop, brick, iron, 3/5
No.20: Yee Jun (occ.), Estate late Samuel Hordern (own), house and shop, brick, iron, 3/5
No.22: B. Callose & Sons Ltd (occ), Estate late Samuel Hordern (own), house and shop, brick, iron, 3/5

1925 (S):
No.12: Choy York, Mrs. & Co., grocer
No.14: Nottingham Castle Hotel
No.16: Sun Man Lee & Co., green grocer
No.20: Wing Sang Co., Ltd, fruit merchants
No.20: Hong Kong Restaurant
No.22: Callose & Sons, general importer

1930 (S):
No.12: Choy York, Mrs. & Co., grocers
No.14: Nottingham Castle Hotel
No.16: Pangas Bros., confectioners, Wards’ Residential
No.18: Wing Sang Co. Ltd, grocer
No.20: NSW Café
No.22: Callose & Sons, general importer

1931 (R):
No.12: The Wah Eng Trading Co. (occ.), The City Mutual Life Assurance Society Ltd (own.), shop and dwelling, brick, iron 3/5
No.14: Mathew Lynch (occ.), The City Mutual Life Assurance Society Ltd (own.), Nottingham Castle Hotel, brick, iron, 3/5
No.16: Pangas Bros. (occ.), Walter Daniel McEvilly (own.), shop & residential, brick, iron, 3
No.18: Wing Sang & Co. Ltd. (own. and occ.), shop & rooms, brick, iron 3/6
No.20: J.Castanos (occ.), Anthony Carroll (own.), shop and rooms, brick, iron, 3/6
No.22: B. Callose & Sons Ltd (own. and occ.), shop and rooms, brick, iron 3/6

1932-3 (S):
No.12: Wah Eng Trading Co., grocers
No.14: Nottingham Castle Hotel
No.16: Brightway Residential
No.18: Wing Sang & Co. Ltd., grocer
No.20: NSW Cafe
No.22: Callose, H. & Sons Ltd, general importers

1939 (R):
No.12: C.M. Ping & Co. (occ.), The City Mutual Life Assurance Co. (own.), shop and dwelling, brick, iron, 3/5
No.14: Kathleen T. Nixon (occ.), The City Mutual Life Assurance Co. (own.), Capitol Hotel, brick, iron, 3/15
No.16: Peter Pangas (occ.), Albert John L. Giddings (own.), shop and residential, brick, iron, 3
No.18: Wing Sang & Co. Ltd (own. and occ.), Shop and rooms, brick, iron, 3/6
No.20: Stavros Joannou (occ.), Anthony Carroll (own.), shop and rooms, brick, iron, 3/6
No.22: B. Callose & Sons Ltd (own. and occ.), shop and rooms, brick, iron 3/6

1948 (R):
No.12: C.M. Ping & Co. (occ.), Tooth & Co. (own.), shop and house, brick, iron, 3/5
No.14: T.P. Barry (occ.), Tooth & Co. (own.), Capitol Hotel, brick, iron, 3/15
No.16: Golden Capitol Café (occ.), Albert J. S. Giddings (own.), Golden Capitol Café and Restaurant, brick, iron, 3
No.18: A. Dupeir (occ), Wing Sang & Co. Ltd (own.), shop, rooms, brick, iron, 3/5
No.20: N. Kintominas (occ.), Estate late Anthony Carroll (own.), shop, rooms, brick, iron, 3/6
No.22: B. Callose & Sons Ltd (own. and occ.), shop and rooms, brick, iron 3/6

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Commerce-Activities relating to buying, selling and exchanging goods and services (none)-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages (none)-

Assessment of significance

SHR Criteria a)
[Historical significance]
The terrace group is closely associated with the establishment of early markets in central Sydney area. The site had long been committed to comercial use since mid Victorian period.
SHR Criteria b)
[Associative significance]
The terrace group has association with the establishment of markets and intense commercial activities in central Sydney area. The shops have long been operated by Chinese communities.
SHR Criteria c)
[Aesthetic significance]
The terrace buildings demonstrating varied details and styles greatly contribute to the townscape and character of Haymarket precinct. The upper level facades are intact
SHR Criteria f)
[Rarity]
No. 14 Campbell Streets hows variant characteristics of the Free Classical and Anglo-Dutch revival styles. The parapet, piers at first floor level and stucco detailing are drawn from the classical tradition. The shallow, curving form of the projection hints at the form of the curving Dutch gable. There would appear to be no comparable examples within the City of Sydney.
SHR Criteria g)
[Representativeness]
The terrace group represents the commcercial and residential establishment and development adjacent to early markets in central Sydney area.

No. 12 Campbell Street is a representative example of a Late Victorian commercial/residential terrace. The overall style of the building is simple, with a restrained Italianate Style parapet. Commercial buildings of this type and style are not uncommon within the City area. Most of these terraces, as with No. 12 Campbell Street, have been extensively modified at ground floor level. Contemporary and near contemporary comparative examples are provided by the heritage listed groups at 767-773 George Street and 779- 791 George Street. These three storey terraces provide a variety of interpretations of the Victorian Italianate Style. A more ornate example of a row is provided by the Victorian Italianate terrace row at 69-79 Liverpool Street, Sydney.


No. 16 Campbell Street is a representative and partially intact example of a Late Victorian commercial terrace, with Mannerist and Classical Style influences, but generally in an Italianate style. Commercial buildings of the mid 1880s are not uncommon with the City area. Many of them have detailed stucco moulding to first and second floors, demonstrating a variety of Victorian influences. The quality of the detailing to the subject terrace is equal to the listed examples such at 155-157 and 163-169 Oxford Street.

18-22 Campbell Street is a fine example of a modest Victorian/ Federation Free Style commercial building of Haymarket. The building is one of a number of buildings within the Haymarket area that demonstrate a similar style (Victorian or Federation Free Classical Style) to the New Belmore Markets, constructed in 1891 and adapted in 1913 to create what is now the Capitol Theatre.
Assessment criteria: Items are assessed against the PDF State Heritage Register (SHR) Criteria to determine the level of significance. Refer to the Listings below for the level of statutory protection.

Recommended management:

Exterior: Surviving original finishes should be retained including face brickwork and stucco. Painted brickwork should be cleaned to reinstate face brickwork in any future work. All existing decorative features on the facades must be retained. The early awning on 14 Campbell St should be retained and properly repaired. Other awnings should be reinstated based on historical evidence. Interior: The interiors at ground level have been altered and little original fabric and features except for the party walls remain. The upper level interiors are to be further inspected and assessed. Any change to the interior must not alter the exterior form of the buildings. The buildings should be retained and conserved. A Heritage Assessment and Heritage Impact Statement, or a Conservation Management Plan, should be prepared prior to any major works being undertaken. There shall be no vertical additions to the building and no alterations to the façade of the buildings other than to reinstate original features. The principal room layout and planning configuration as well as significant internal original features including ceilings, cornices, joinery, flooring and fireplaces should be retained and conserved. Any additions and alterations should be confined to the rear in areas of less significance, should not be visibly prominent and shall be in accordance with the relevant planning controls.

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Local Environmental PlanSydney LEP 2012I82714 Dec 12   
Heritage study     

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
Written Apperly, Richard, Irving, Robert and Reynolds, Peter1989A Pictorial Guide to Identifying Australian Architecture
Written Ashton, Paul and Waterson, Duncan2000Sydney Takes Shape: A History in Maps
Written City of Sydney Rate and Valuation Records  
Written Fitzgerald, Shirley1996Red Tape, Gold Scissors: The Story of Sydney’s Chinese
Written Fitzgerald, Shirley1992Sydney 1842-1992
Written Maclehose, James1977Picture of Sydney and Strangers’ Guide to New South Wales for 1839
WrittenBuilding Application Street Cards  

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

rez rez rez rez
(Click on thumbnail for full size image and image details)

Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Local Government
Database number: 2435698


Every effort has been made to ensure that information contained in the State Heritage Inventory is correct. If you find any errors or omissions please send your comments to the Database Manager.

All information and pictures on this page are the copyright of the Heritage Division or respective copyright owners.