Nanima Homestead | NSW Environment, Energy and Science

Culture and heritage

Heritage

Nanima Homestead

Item details

Name of item: Nanima Homestead
Other name/s: Myami
Type of item: Built
Group/Collection: Residential buildings (private)
Category: House
Location: Lat: 148.953 Long: -32.5331
Primary address: 7009 Goolma Road, MONTEFIORES, NSW 2820
Parish: Nanima
County: Bligh
Local govt. area: Wellington

Boundary:

Mudgee Road, 1.6 km north of Wellington.
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
7009 Goolma RoadMONTEFIORESWellingtonNanimaBlighPrimary Address

Statement of significance:

One of the most socially interesting, unusually designed and intact Edwardian rural homesteads in New South Wales. The interior is distinguished by the extent of original decoration and the large top-lit central living hall. The house is still in the possession of the Barton family (2012) but for sale, the forbears having built It. The site is threatened by the proposed gas fired power station on an adjoining site where the emission noise threatens to make the residence uninhabitable.
Date significance updated: 01 Jul 13
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Construction years: 1900-1901
Physical description: Nanima is a large single storey Bungalow homestead in the Queen Anne style located on top of a prominent hill overlooking Wellington. The house is surrounded by timber verandahs with a bull-nosed corrugated iron roof supported by slender posts.

Ceilings 20 feet high and walls a foot thick are other reminders of the turn of the century, when Dr Barton, with his brothers and sisters roamed the expanse of columns with brackets and frieze. A feature of the house is the high pitched roof with a central tower of glass & timber.

The interior is planned around a large central hall which was used as the ballroom and is lit by the tower. The rooms still contain most of the original decoration and furniture. The interiors are splendid examples of Edwardian interiors. Beyond the Federation style garden is a detached stable and coach house and two good underground tanks.

Ceilings 20 feet high and walls a foot thick are other reminders of the turn of the century, when Dr Barton, with his brothers and sisters roamed the expanse of landscaped garden surrounding the homestead.

On entering the stained glass door of the house, one is surrounded by the magnificence of the house as it was when it was built 77 years ago. Pieces of furniture which take pride of place in the homestead are the mahogany desk which Dr Barton’s grandfather brought out from England and a picture above it of the boat in which he travelled on coming out to Australia.

Leading off the entrance hall is the ballroom with the lounge-room, with to the right and the dining room on the left. The ballroom, with a ceiling which reaches up seemingly forever is centred by a skylight. It is now furnished with period pieces and a billiard table insignificant in the vastness of the room.

The great expanse of table in the dining room is a reminder of days gone by when all the mistresses of the house had to do towards entertaining at a dinner party was merely to organise her servants. The marble fireplaces in the homestead were imported from Italy.

An indication of the homestead’s size is the number of bedrooms. Dr Barton admitted he had no idea how many squares the house was. However, there are nine bedrooms.

The single storey homestead, with its shuttered windows, is engulfed in an expanse of verandah, which reaches almost around the house.
Physical condition and/or
Archaeological potential:
Some attention is needed to the timber verandahs where weather has eroded the outer timber boards and creepers have blocked guttering and downpipes.
Date condition updated:08 Oct 12
Modifications and dates: Minor decorative and services alterations have been completed.
Further information: Studies during the environmental Impact study stage of the Power Station option and design study stage failed to protect the site from noise. The conclusion was that the residence would not meet acceptable noise standards despite proposals for tree planting, earth mounds, double glazing to windows and insulation to the roofing. The future of the property is uncertain (2012)
Current use: Residence
Former use: Residence

History

Historical notes: In August 1834 Joseph Barrow Montefiore, a wealthy tea merchant, received a grant of 2,560 acres of land in the Wellington Valley.

On 13 December 1834 he added 1,000 acres at Burran Burran.

By 1838 Montefiore had increased his holdings to 11,300 acres as well as land held under lease & speculations in land in the village of Melbourne.

In 1835, visitors James Backhouse & George Walker wrote:
"At Myami a Sydney merchant has erected some good wooden buildings, consisting of a dwelling-house, prisoners' huts a large wool-shed etc. Most of them are weatherboard of the Pine of this neighbourhood which is a species of Callitris the wood is fragrant. The prisoners' huts are of logs 'Myami' is a large location of roughish basaltic open grassy forest"

In 1836 Montefiore applied for extra convict labour referring to his property as "Nanima" meaning "the other side of the river"

In 1839 he leased the property to Dr Rygate and in 1849 Nanima was placed on the market. Joseph Aarons paid £*** for sixteen acres and fourteen thousand sheep. He was active in local affairs & added a large shearing shed with sixteen stands. With the droughts of 1889 & 1893 Aarons was in financial difficulty & unable to meet the Bank's demands.

Seven thousand acres were auctioned in 1893 & the rest was sold by the Commercial Banking company in 1894 to C. H. Barton, manager of the local branch of the bank & owner of "Towri". Barton continued to act as manager of the bank until 1900 and "Nanima" was managed by RM Smith.

Barton built the present house in 1900 & moved there in 1901.

**************************************************************************************************
THE HOME AT NANIMA

Echoes of Grand Old Days Preserved at Nanima Home.
By Jenni Marriott

Published in Wellington Times Monday, 25th April 1977.


Ä Georgian homestead built on the outskirts of Wellington at the turn of the century, still echoes the days of horse-drawn carriages and maids. ‘Nanima,’ the grand home of the Barton family, rises like a monument from a hill overlooking the town below. The horse-drawn carriages that once rumbled up to the house, filled with ball guests, are still there tucked away in the stables at the back of the sprawling homestead.

‘Nanima’ property has been in the Barton family since 1894 when Mr Charles H. Barton, a bank manager from Sydney bought the property from Mr Aarons, one time Mayor of Wellington. Constructed of rubble and concrete, the magnificent home was built in 1900 and the family moved in the next year.

The house is now occupied by Mr Charles Barton’s son, Dr Nat Barton, the second generation to live in the house. Dr Barton, who has a medical practice in Wellington, moved into the house in 1945 after returning from World War II. His wife (now deceased), the former Mary Franklyn Mort, had moved in five years earlier.

Dr Barton, one of a family of eight children, is constantly reminded of his childhood days, by the bells in every room which were then used to summons the maids from the kitchens. There are no maids there now. The house is kept in order by a housekeeper.

Ceilings 20 feet high and walls a foot thick are other reminders of the turn of the century, when Dr Barton, with his brothers and sisters roamed the expanse of landscaped garden surrounding the homestead.

On entering the stained glass door of the house, one is surrounded by the magnificence of the house as it was when it was built 77 years ago. Pieces of furniture which take pride of place in the homestead are the mahogany desk which Dr Barton’s grandfather brought out from England and a picture above it of the boat in which he travelled on coming out to Australia. The desk, typical of the period, has ‘thousands of secret compartments’, Dr Barton said.

Leading off the entrance hall is the ballroom with the lounge-room, with to the right and the dining room on the left. The ballroom, with a ceiling which reaches up seemingly forever is centred by a skylight. It is now furnished with period pieces and a billiard table insignificant in the vastness of the room.

The great expanse of table in the dining room is a reminder of days gone by when all the mistresses of the house had to do towards entertaining at a dinner party was merely to organise her servants. The marble fireplaces in the homestead were imported from Italy.

An indication of the homestead’s size is the number of bedrooms. Dr Barton admitted he had no idea how many squares the house was. However, there are nine bedrooms. The single storey homestead, with its shuttered windows, is engulfed in an expanse of verandah, which reaches almost around the house.

Although Dr Barton admitted that his home was expensive to maintain, he has no thoughts of moving into a smaller house.
"Ï’m hoping that the Nanima homestead will be passed down from one generation to another." he said. "But I think the next occupant of the house will be one of my grandchildren, as my sons don’t seem very interested in leaving their homes to move here. Ïf one of my grandchildren wanted to live here after they married. I would probably be only too happy to move out for them to keep the homestead in the family."

His two sons, Dan and Brian, are still living in the district, but his daughters Mrs Jane Butler and Mrs Susanne Hawker have moved away.

The Barton name is steeped in local history. Banjo Patterson was Dr Barton’s first cousin.

Time has moved on.

But at ‘Nanima’ homestead the only indication of this is the stereo play Dr Barton has tucked away in a corner of his lounge-room.

The historic significance of this remarkable home has recently been recognised with it being proposed for the first list of the Register of the National Estate.

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Private residence-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Homestead architecture - atrium-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Social institutions-Activities and organisational arrangements for the provision of social activities Places of informal community gathering-

Assessment of significance

SHR Criteria a)
[Historical significance]
The Barton family have been prominent in the developmental and social life of Wellington for more than a century. Because of this Nanima has historical importance to the community and is an icon to the district.
SHR Criteria b)
[Associative significance]
The Barton family
SHR Criteria c)
[Aesthetic significance]
One of the most interesting and intact Edwardian homesteads in New South Wales. The interior is distinguished by the amount original decoration and the large top lit central living hall. The house is still in the possession of the Barton family who built it.
SHR Criteria d)
[Social significance]
Namima was the centre of much of the social life of the community since it was built in 1901 and most of the important events of that time were held at Nanima.
SHR Criteria f)
[Rarity]
The internal living room with raised conservatory style rooflighting or clerestorey make this a rare building type within Australia
Integrity/Intactness: Good/good
Assessment criteria: Items are assessed against the PDF State Heritage Register (SHR) Criteria to determine the level of significance. Refer to the Listings below for the level of statutory protection.

Recommended management:

Seek an appropriate use for the property other than residential given the noise impact forecast by the operating Power Station. Continue to record the valued archival material from family research and other sources.

Recommendations

Management CategoryDescriptionDate Updated
Statutory InstrumentList on a Local Environmental Plan (LEP)04 Mar 11
Recommended ManagementConsult with owner and/or community04 Mar 11

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Local Environmental PlanWellington Local Environmental Plan 2012I5123 Nov 12 57864
Local Environmental Plan - LapsedSchedule 13231 Mar 00 422790

Study details

TitleYearNumberAuthorInspected byGuidelines used
Wellington Community based Heritage Study 20022002 Wellington CBHS Working Party  Yes
Wellington Shire Community based Heritage Study2011 David Scobie Heritage Advisor  Yes

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
WrittenDI McDonald1968They came to a Valley, Wellington Times Printing, Wellington 1968
WrittenJ. Hiatt from Jenny Marriott:1977The Home at Nanima
WrittenRobert Porter1906History of Wellington

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

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Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Local Government
Database number: 2640104
File number: 000498


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