Coonamble Railway Station | NSW Environment & Heritage

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Coonamble Railway Station

Item details

Name of item: Coonamble Railway Station
Type of item: Built
Group/Collection: Transport - Rail
Category: Railway Platform/ Station
Primary address: Railway Street, Coonamble, NSW 2829
Parish: Coonamble
County: Leichhardt
Local govt. area: Coonamble

Boundary:

The listing boundary is formed by a line parallel to the platform face on the far side of the tracks, a line crossing the tracks at either end of the platform at a distance of approximately 20 metres from the end of the platform and the street frontage boundary behind the station building.
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
Railway StreetCoonambleCoonambleCoonambleLeichhardtPrimary Address

Owner/s

Organisation NameOwner CategoryDate Ownership Updated
Country Regional Network (CRN)Private 

Statement of significance:

Coonamble is significant as possibly the only intact brick pioneer station building in NSW. The station is an important civic building in Coonamble. It is well detailed and proportioned with the unusual use of a roughcast render on the gables and the use of non-standard timber detailing. The timber goods shed provides evidence of former activities in the goods yard, namely the storage and transportation of goods to and from Coonamble. (SHI database no. 4280350, SHR 1117, Coonamble LEP 2011 listing no. I5)
Date significance updated: 20 Sep 07
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Builder/Maker: NSW Railways construction
Physical description: Extant items include the type 16, brick pioneer station building with awning (c1910), and timber goods shed (c1910).Coonamble Railway Station Building:Unpainted symmetrical brick building with corrugated iron clad roof with transverse gables at either side. Decorative timber barge boards, pendants, finials and vents under eaves at gable ends. Two brick chimneys. Projecting awning to platform with corrugated iron roof, timber valance and curved steel wall mounted decorative brackets in timber mouldings. No posts. Verandah to road side with corrugated iron skillion roof, timber balustrade and decorative timber posts with matching slightly curved brackets. Northern gable end facing road with double timber doors (for access to parcels room). Reconstructed timber platform face with asphalt surface. (GML, 2016)
Physical condition and/or
Archaeological potential:
Coonamble Station Building:Condition: Fair (2015)(Boarded up, unmaintained, some graffiti and minor decay; platform recently reconstructed.)Integrity: Medium (2015) (Structure and key features mostly intact, no apparent major modifications, windows and doors boarded up.) Rare example of a brick pioneer station building.)External condition November 2007: fair.Internal condition November 2007: poor.
Date condition updated:05 Dec 07
Modifications and dates: Goods shed no longer extant
Further information: Significance Assessment:SHR Criteria a)[Historical significance] The 1903 railway station and related structures were, for much of the 20th century, prominent features in Coonamble and were integral to Coonamble's development as a rural centre. SHR Criteria c)[Aesthetic significance] The station building is well detailed and proportioned with the unusual use of a roughcast render on the gables and the use of non-standard timber detailing. SHR Criteria f)[Rarity] Coonamble is significant as possibly the only intact brick pioneer station building in NSW. (Another example is Narrabri which has been altered).
Current use: Not occupied - building boarded up
Former use: Railway station including booking office, waiting room, parcels office and amenities

History

Historical notes: Possibly the earliest public record mentioning a proposed railway line to Coonamble was made by Mr. Watson, Colonial Treasurer, during a debate on railway extensions in c1881. By June 1883, a survey from Dubbo had been authorised by the then minister for Public Works, Mr. F.A. Wright. Much later, in 1896, J.H. Young (Minister for Public Works) promised a deputation that he would ascertain the best way of connecting Coonamble to the railway system. In 1899, a survey was carried out for a proposed line from Mudgee to Dubbo via Gulgong, and consideration was given to extending the survey to Coonamble (Forsyth, 1985).By December 1897, an investigation had begun into another proposed route: a line from Warren to Coonamble. Both lines (Warren to Coonamble and Dubbo to Coonamble) were considered, with the disadvantage of the Dubbo route thought to be the higher cost of acquiring land and the extra length of construction (102km via Warren compared to 150.5 km from Dubbo). The Mudgee to Coonamble route was also considered and would have been at a distance of 236.5 km (Forsyth, 1985).On April 29 1898, the Public Works Committee met and recommended the line between Warren to Coonamble not be built. By 1899 the Dubbo to Coonamble route was the frontrunner, with Coonamble residents giving evidence in its favour. A list of points in favour of the Dubbo route were given: that the Dubbo route was less expensive than via Mudgee, connected directly with the western line, was favoured by people along the route and that it served an area with better quality land (Forsyth, 1985).On 9 March 1899, a Committee had begun an investigation into the proposed line from Dubbo to Coonamble and a few weeks later (on 18 March 1899) a public meeting held at Gilgandra resulted in the formation of a railway league to advocate for construction of the proposed railway line between Dubbo and Coonamble via Balladoran, Curban and Gilgandra (Forsyth, 1985).By 13 July 1899, the Committee had recommended construction of a line from Dubbo to Coonamble, and by November 1900 work had commenced. A contract was let to W.H. Hudson for construction of station buildings at Brocklehurst, Goonoo, Coalbaggie, Balladoran and Gilgandra. In May 1902, a contract was let for construction of station buildings at Berida, Curban, Gulargambone, Combara and Coonamble. By December 3 1902, track work was sufficiently advanced to allow mixed trains to and from Coonamble and the line was later officially handed over to the Department of Railways on February 18, 1903 (Forsyth, 1985).

Assessment of significance

SHR Criteria a)
[Historical significance]
The 1903 railway station and related structures were, for much of the 20th century, prominent features in Coonamble and were integral to Coonamble's development as a rural centre.
SHR Criteria c)
[Aesthetic significance]
The station building is well detailed and proportioned with the unusual use of a roughcast render on the gables and the use of non-standard timber detailing.
SHR Criteria f)
[Rarity]
Coonamble is significant as possibly the only intact brick pioneer station building in NSW. (Another example is Narrabri which has been altered).
Integrity/Intactness: The station building retains a high level of intactness.
Assessment criteria: Items are assessed against the PDF State Heritage Register (SHR) Criteria to determine the level of significance. Refer to the Listings below for the level of statutory protection.

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Heritage Act - s.170 NSW State agency heritage register     

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
WrittenJ.H. Forsyth1985Historical notes on railway lines: Volume 2
WrittenState Rail Authority of NSW, Archives Section1993How and why of station names

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

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Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: State Government
Database number: 3150072


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