The Prince Henry Hospital Precinct | NSW Environment, Energy and Science

Culture and heritage

Heritage

The Prince Henry Hospital Precinct

Item details

Name of item: The Prince Henry Hospital Precinct
Type of item: Built
Primary address: Anzac Parade, Little Bay, NSW 2036
Parish: BOTANY
County: CUMBERLAND
Local govt. area: Randwick
Property description
Lot/Volume CodeLot/Volume NumberSection NumberPlan/Folio CodePlan/Folio Number
     
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
Anzac ParadeLittle BayRandwickBOTANYCUMBERLANDPrimary Address

Owner/s

Organisation NameOwner CategoryDate Ownership Updated
Ministry of HealthState Government20 Jul 05

Statement of significance:

The placeis an area which has Aboriginal, social, historic, architectural, scientific and aesthetic signficance and which has been associated with the treatment of infectious diseases since 1881. The location of the hospital distanced from Sydney an its planning, is indicative of the community fear held at the time of its establishment for epidemic diseases such as leprosy, dysentery, typhus, typhoid, cholera, smallpox, malaria and plague. The Leprosy Lazaret is a significant Aboriginal historic site because it was part of a system of government control instituted over Aboriginal people. The area has social signficance to the la Perous Aboriginal community. the history of the hospital is linked with the hisotry of infectious disease in Australia and the achievements in medical science in overcoming and treating these diseases. Within the area are buidings, some of architectural significance and sites which demonstrate aspects of the development of the hospital. There are also important archaeological remains of hospital structures and the hospital cemetery. The setting of the hospital is bounded on the east by an important section of the coastline, with high visual values and geological interest.
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Physical description: Location: About 80ha, Anzac Parade, Little Bay, comprising 1) the area bounded on the west by the western boundary of the current Prince Henry Hospital site, on the south by the southern boundaries of the hospital site and the Coast Golf Course, on the east by Low Water Mark and on the north by the northern boudnary of the hospital site and the western and northern boundaries of the Coast Golf Course, 2) cemetery, located 1.3km south-south- east of the hospital, 3) the old road formation leading to the cemetery from the north; and, 4) the old road formation on the western side of St Michaels Gold Links.
Description: Regarding the Aboriginal use of this place, there is a report that Little Bay was a fairly important Aboriginal camping ground between Sydney and Botany Bay, and six Aboriginal pathways reportedly led to it. There are a number of Aboriginal sites located within the conservation area. They include an axe grinding groove site, a discontinuous band of shell midden following the beach on the southern side of Little Bay, a sandstone shelter with shell midden and a number of engraving sites.
Current use: Hospital
Former use: Hospital

History

Historical notes: Historically, the area was also important to Aboriginal people, Pacific Islanders and Aboriginal people suffering from leprosy were treated at the Leprosy Lazarate at the coast hospital. Two cemeteries were associated with the coast hospital. A number of Pacific Islanders were buried in one of these and there is a strong oral tradition in the La Perouse Aboriginal community that Aboriginal people are buried here as well. The area thus has strong social significance to the La Perous community. The Little Bay area is also important to this community becasue Aborignal people continue to use this locality as a place to obtain food and this assists in maintaining traditional knowledge about such practices. The first use of the Little Bay area for medical care wasin 1879, when three Chinese lepers werw isolated in huts near the Bay. following an outbreak of smallpox in hte winter of 1881, the Colonial Government decided to establish an infectious disease hospital to replace the inadequate facilities at the only other isolation site, North Head Quarantine Station and 500 acres were reserved at Little Bay. Whilst the colonial architect was instructed to erect a suitable pavililn hospital on the land, the first hospital facilities were contained in bell tents near the beach and admissions to the tents started on 5 September 1881. When the construction of the Coast Hospital was completed, it consisted of six pavilion wards and two private pavilion wards joined by a covered verandah, two specially isolated pavilion ward, together with quarters for medical and nursing staff and various other buildings. The buildings were constructed in wood and corrugated iron, being finally demolished following World War II. The water supply for the hospital proper was obtained from the stream entering the southern side of Little Bay, across which a dam was constructed. In addition to the hosital accommodation, a separate sanatorium, consisting of five pavilions, was constructed in a section known as the Healthy Ground, located directly above Little Bay to the north-east of the hospital proper and fenced off from it. By 1886, the sanatorium was used for infectious cases, a role it fulfilled until its demolition in 1937. Part of the Healthy Ground is now occupied by the Marks Pavilion. In 1890 a new Lazaret was erected on the north side of Little Bay to house leprosy patients, the buidings in this complex being finally demolisehd in 1966. Early in the 20th century it was recommended that a gradual rebuilding of the general section of the hospital should be made. By 1913 the Minister for Health, Fred Flowers, had prepared an extensive rebuiding scheme which included the construction of twenty wards. The foundation stone was laid on 7 November 1914 and by the end fo the War (1918) six pavilions had been completed. The project was never completed. In 1934 the name of the Coast Hospital was changed, not wihtout opposition, to the Prince Henry Hospital, to commemorate the visit then of Henry, Duke of Gloucester. An extensive buidling program was embarked on during the 1930s. The significant buildings and sites include the follwing 1) the Flowers Hospital, 2) store, formerly lecture hall, 3) managers (pine) cottage, 4) six residential cottages, 5)( two military wards, 6) the 1930s nurses home, 7) sewing room, the former superintendent's cottage, 8) institute of tropical medicine, 9) nurses memorial chapel, 10) golf club house, th former laundry, 11) memorial clocktower and clock 12) phoenix palms, coral trees and Norfolk Island pines, 13) dam and pond, 14) site of stables and workshops complex, 15) site of male Lazaret, 16) rock pool, 17) road formation between chapel and dam, 18) road formation approaching the cemetery, 19) road formation between St Michael's Golf Links and Jennifer Street, 20) the cemetery, 21) tramway formation.

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Health-Activities associated with preparing and providing medical assistance and/or promoting or maintaining the well being of humans (none)-

Assessment of significance

SHR Criteria a)
[Historical significance]
The location of the hospital distanced from Sydney an its planning, is indicative of the community fear held at the time of its establishment for epidemic diseases such as leprosy, dysentery, typhus, typhoid, cholera, smallpox, malaria and plague. The Leprosy Lazaret is a significant Aboriginal historic site because it was part of a system of government control instituted over Aboriginal people.
SHR Criteria c)
[Aesthetic significance]
Within the area are buildings, some of architectural significance and sites which demonstrate aspects of the deelopment of the hospital. There are also important archaeological remains of hospital structures and the hospital cemetery. The setting of the hospital is bounded on the east by an important section of the coastline, with high visual values and geological interest.
SHR Criteria d)
[Social significance]
The area has social significance to the La Perouse Aboriginal community. The history of the hospital is linked with the history of infectious disease in Australia and the achievements in medical science in overcoming and treating these diseases.
Assessment criteria: Items are assessed against the PDF State Heritage Register (SHR) Criteria to determine the level of significance. Refer to the Listings below for the level of statutory protection.

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Heritage Act - s.170 NSW State agency heritage registerDep. Of Health s.170 Register    

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
WrittenRNE Study

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: State Government
Database number: 3540140


Every effort has been made to ensure that information contained in the State Heritage Inventory is correct. If you find any errors or omissions please send your comments to the Database Manager.

All information and pictures on this page are the copyright of the Heritage Division or respective copyright owners.