Toongabbie Railway Station Group, Underbridge & Archaeological Remains | NSW Environment & Heritage

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Toongabbie Railway Station Group, Underbridge & Archaeological Remains

Item details

Name of item: Toongabbie Railway Station Group, Underbridge & Archaeological Remains
Type of item: Built
Group/Collection: Transport - Rail
Category: Railway Platform/ Station
Primary address: Portico Parade, Toongabbie, NSW 2146
Parish: Prospect
County: Cumberland
Local govt. area: Holroyd

Boundary:

STATION: North & South: 5 metres from end of the platforms; East: RailCorp property boundary fronting Wentworth Avenue; West: RailCorp property boundary fronting Portico Parade. UNDERBRIDGE/ARCHAEOLOGICAL REMAINS: North & South: 5 metres from the abutments of the Underbridge; East & West: edge of underbridge. Any proposed development within the vicinity of the listed site should also consider the historic relationship between the listing and its surrounding area.
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
Portico ParadeToongabbieHolroydProspectCumberlandPrimary Address
Wentworth AvenueToongabbieHolroyd  Alternate Address

Owner/s

Organisation NameOwner CategoryDate Ownership Updated
RailCorpState Government 
RailCorpState Government 
RailCorpState Government 

Statement of significance:

Toongabbie Railway Station is of local significance as evidence of the railway station redevelopment that took place during the quadruplication of the Main Western Line between Lidcombe and St Mary's in 1946. The station buildings are of aesthetic significance as good examples of mid-20th Century railway construction in an urban context displaying distinctive elements of the Inter War Stripped Functionalist style. They are competently executed and display many typical stylistic elements of similar station buildings throughout New South Wales and in the western suburbs generally, and are of the same construction as those of the neighbouring stations Pendle Hill, Wentworthville and Westmead (demolished). This group of buildings shows effects of war time financial constraints.

The archaeological remains under the Greystanes Creek Underbridge have local significance for their ability to demonstrate the expansion of the railways and the historical stages of railway development in Toongabbie. The archaeological site is of research significance as it provides evidence of previous types of railway bridges used for creek crossings between 1860 and 1946.
Date significance updated: 10 Sep 08
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Designer/Maker: NSW Department of Railways
Builder/Maker: NSW Department of Railways
Construction years: 1942-1946
Physical description: BUILDINGS
Station Buildings, Platform 1/2, brick, type 13 (1943)
Station Buildings, Platform 3/4, brick, type 13 (1943)

STRUCTURES
2x Island Platforms, brick faced (1943)
Footbridge, steel beam with RSJ steel supports, stairs and ramps (1946)
Underbridge and Archaeological Remains (c1860, c1880, 1946, 2013)

STATION BUILDING PLATFORM 1/2 (1943)
External: The building on Platform 1/2 is larger than Platform 3/4 building and is a post war Functionalist style railway building. It is of face brick construction with low pitched gabled roof and brick parapets at each end with courses of recessed heeler bricks capped by a course of bullnosed bricks. The northern end of the building is defined by a curved masonry bay with a single door. Centrally located on each parapet is an Art Deco style projecting vertical masonry fin constructed of heeler bricks in a contrasting colour. The parapets step down on each side from the fin. The roof is clad with Colorbond, which extends as an awning on all four sides of the building. The awning on the southern end, which provides shelter to passengers purchasing tickets from the ticket window and the machine, is supported by two rectangular brick columns with curved corners. On Platform 1/ 2, one ticket window remains in use while the other is bricked up. Steel framed windows with three horizontal hopper panels (central panel fixed) are vertically proportioned and placed regularly on both platform elevations. A contemporary canopy connects the building from the underside of the original awning to the stairs and footbridge.

Internal: Internally the building has a linear floor layout with a series of rooms in various sizes including combined former booking/parcels office (now booking office and staff area) with storeroom, general waiting room, ladies room and toilets, men's toilets with a store room in the curved bay. The doors are secured by metal grill gates while the windows are covered with security mesh. All of the original interior fit-out has been removed.

STATION BUILDING PLATFORM 3/4 (1943)
External: The station building on Platform 3/4 is approximately half the size of the Platform 1/2 building featuring the same detailing and architectural style with the exception of the curved bay on one end. It is of face brick construction with low pitched gabled roof and brick parapets at each end with courses of recessed heeler bricks capped by a course of bullnosed bricks. Centrally located on each parapet is an Art Deco style projecting vertical masonry fin constructed of heeler bricks in a contrasting colour. The parapets step down on each side from the fin. The roof is clad with Colorbond which extends as an awning on all four sides of the building. The awning on the southern end, which provides shelter to passengers purchasing tickets from the ticket machine, is supported by two rectangular brick columns with curved corners. The building has one ticket window, unlike Pendle Hill (and formerly Westmead) which had two. Early timber doors are extant. The standard steel framed windows with three horizontal hopper panels (central panel fixed) are vertically proportioned and placed regularly on both platform elevations between the solid timber doors. A contemporary canopy connects the building from the underside of the original awning to the stairs and footbridge.

Internal: Internally the building has a linear floor layout consisting of a former booking office and a waiting room. The doors are secured by metal grill gates while the windows are covered by security mesh. The former booking office is currently used for storage purposes. The internal finishes are the same as the other platform building.

PLATFORMS (1943)
Both island platforms have brick faces with concrete deck and asphalt surfaces. Some sections are steel rail post and concrete panel cast in situ. Modern aluminium palisade fencing, timber bench seating, lighting and signage are located on both of the platforms.

FOOTBRIDGE (1946)
The footbridge is a steel beam structure supported on RSJ steel trestles with concrete deck over the platforms and main lines with stairs to each of the platforms, and a ramp to street level on each side. It is of a simple structure with no ornamentation representing economic policies of the time. The footbridge and associated stairs and ramps are covered with corrugated metal awnings.

UNDERBRIDGE & ARCHAEOLOGICAL REMAINS (c1860, c1880, 1946)
The visible areas of the underbridge consists of a 1946 four rail line crossing over Greystanes Creek with wooden sleepers over riveted steel girder with steel box and Pratt truss transoms supported on 1946 dry-pressed brick foundations. Underneath and at the edges of this underbridge are the piers of two previous bridges including top sections of c1860 sandstone aggregate piers and at the edges remnants of c1880 concrete pylons with blue metal aggregate. The present bridge replaced the c1880 underbridge with concrete pylons. The water level and weed growth obscures much of the view of the remains. In 2013 the transom top underbridge was converted to ballast top. Tthe timber footings from remain.


MOVEABLE HERITAGE
A Milners Patent Fire Resistant Special Safe is located in the booking office.
There is a rack in the Platform 3/4 former booking office that maybe the book rack identified as potential moveable heritage in 2000.
The booking office on Platform 3/4 has also an original built in timber counter.
Set of two and a single timber rollover indicator board with clock faces and foot pedals (still in use in 2016).

POTENTIAL ARCHAEOLOGICAL FEATURES
Toongabbie Railway Station site is considered to have low archaeological potential, with little evidence of the early station buildings likely to remain. The archaeological potential for the remains below the Underbridge are likely to be high as there is no evidence that suggests they have been removed, rather than simply overgrown.
Physical condition and/or
Archaeological potential:
STATION BUILDINGS
The station buildings are in good condition internally and externally. Some minor repair work will be required over time to prevent further deterioration. Some brick cleaning may also be required on the parapets in particular. Asphalt may require removal from around the base of the walls should evidence of rising damp/salt or other issues arise from the raised ground level.

PLATFORMS AND FOOTBRIDGE
The platforms and footbridge are also in good condition.

UNDERBRIDGE & ARCHAEOLOGICAL REMAINS
Underbridge: Good
Archaeological Remains: Due to the overgrown nature of the creek area, condition of the archaeological remains under the railway viaduct could not be identified.
Date condition updated:02 Dec 08
Modifications and dates: 1947 - Unspecified improvements to station building. Subsequent modifications not known.
1997 - Modifications to booking office.
1946 - Bridges supporting the two tracks crossed Greystanes Creek near Portico Parade demolished and replaced
N.d - Internal modifications to station building.
2013 - Underbridge converted from transom top to ballast top.
2016 - Kiosk (c1954) demolished.
Current use: Railway station; underbridge
Former use: Nil

History

Historical notes: Toongabbie was originally the name of an extension to the Rose Hill farm, which opened in 1791, being named New Grounds and later Toongab-be and it was the second white settled area to be given an Aboriginal name. The word may have meant the junction of two creeks, or meeting of the waters or near the water. The railway line opened through Toongabbie in 1860 and was duplicated in 1886 with the station opening in 1880.

On 4 October 1901 a junction was laid in for siding to Emu Gravel & Prospect Company’s quarry. The line to the quarry left the main line just before the station. The line then proceeded slightly west of Girraween Road and across Teague Street east of Toongabbie Road. The line crossed the latter road just past the northern end of Okalahoma Avenue, west of Toongabbie Road, then across the Great Western Highway and along Quarry Road to the quarry site, situated east of the Prospect Reservoir wall.

In 1913, the platforms were reconstructed and in 1920 a new station building was constructed in concrete. Quadruplication of the line occurred between Lidcombe and St Marys in 1946. The original station buildings were demolished, and present buildings including a footbridge formed by steel beams were erected. The use of ramps instead of footways was a common feature of footbridges between 1930 and 1960. They were opened on 30 October 1946.

Bridges supporting the two tracks crossed Greystanes Creek near Portico Parade were also demolished and replaced in 1946 in conjunction with quadruplication. The support piers of the earlier bridges are extant beneath the deck of the 1946 bridges. The present bridge replaced one with concrete pylons with blue metal aggregate. The initial bridge had wooden piers set in sandstone aggregate concrete. Their form is the same as hundreds of other bridges.

A pedestrian bridge was also built over the railway line at McCoy Street north of the station and Greystones Creek in c1946. It was replaced with a new structure c1996.

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Transport-Activities associated with the moving of people and goods from one place to another, and systems for the provision of such movements Building the railway network-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Impacts of railways on urban form-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Evolution of design in railway architecture-

Assessment of significance

SHR Criteria a)
[Historical significance]
Toongabbie Railway Station is of historical significance as one of several stations constructed as part of the quadruplication of the line from St Marys to Lidcombe in the 1940s. The underbridge and archaeological remains under the Greystanes Creek Underbridge have historical significance for their ability to demonstrate the expansion of the railways and the historical stages of railway development in Toongabbie.
SHR Criteria c)
[Aesthetic significance]
Toongabbie Railway Station is of aesthetic significance as an example of a mid-sized Inter-War Stripped Functionalist station buildings in an urban setting. The buildings are noted for their use of bonded brickwork, Art Deco influenced parapet detailing, strong horizontal planes and steel awnings.

The archaeological remnants of previous bridges, together with the existing underbridge provide a visually interesting landscape.
SHR Criteria d)
[Social significance]
The place has the potential to contribute to the local community's sense of place, and can provide a connection to the local community's past.
SHR Criteria e)
[Research potential]
Toongabbie Railway Station is of research significance for its ability to demonstrate design and construction techniques of the mid-20th century railway structures and for its ability to provide evidence of the use of Inter War Stripped Functionalist elements in a railway setting. The station buildings provide opportunities together with Wentworthville, Pendle Hill and Seven Hills stations to study and understand mid-20th century building techniques.

The archaeological site has research significance in providing evidence of previous types of railway bridges used for creek crossings and opportunity for comparison between bridge construction techniques between 1860 and 1946.
SHR Criteria f)
[Rarity]
The archaeological remains of the former bridge structures are one of two early railway viaducts surveyed in the Holroyd Municipality, though the bridge's integrity is reduced due to refurbishment.
SHR Criteria g)
[Representativeness]
Toongabbie Railway Station is a representative example of a small, mid-20th century railway station that is designed in the Inter War Stripped Functionalist style in an urban context, similar to Pendle Hill and Wentworthville stations.
The footbridge was identified as an item of moderate heritage significance in the comparative analysis from the 2016 ‘Railway Footbridges Heritage Conservation Strategy’.
Integrity/Intactness: The station buildings have retained a degree of integrity externally. The railway refurbished underbridge over Greystanes Creek has a low of integrity though the timber footing remain.
Assessment criteria: Items are assessed against the PDF State Heritage Register (SHR) Criteria to determine the level of significance. Refer to the Listings below for the level of statutory protection.

Recommended management:

1. Conservation principles: Conserve cultural heritage significance and minimise impacts on heritage values and fabric in accordance with the ‘Australia ICOMOS Charter for Places of Cultural Significance’. 2. Specialist advice: Seek advice from a qualified heritage specialist during all phases of a proposed project from feasibility, concept and option planning stage; detailed design; heritage approval and assessment; through to construction and finalisation. 3. Documentation: Prepare a Statement of Heritage Impact (SOHI) to assess, minimise and prevent heritage impacts as part of the assessment and approval phase of a project. Prepare a Conservation Management Plan (CMP) prior to proposing major works (such as new additions, change of use or proposed demolition) at all places of State significance and all complex sites of Local significance. 4. Maintenance and repair: Undertake annual inspections and proactive routine maintenance works to conserve heritage fabric in accordance with the ‘Minimum Standards of Maintenance & Repair’. 5. Movable heritage: Retain in situ and care for historic contents, fixtures, fittings, equipment and objects which contribute to cultural heritage significance. Return or reinstate missing features or relocated items where opportunities arise. 6. Aboriginal, archaeology and natural heritage: Consider all aspects of potential heritage significance as part of assessing and minimising potential impacts, including Aboriginal, archaeology and natural heritage. 7. Unidentified heritage items: Heritage inventory sheets do not describe or capture all contributory heritage items within an identified curtilage (such as minor buildings, structures, archaeology, landscape elements, movable heritage and significant interiors and finishes). Ensure heritage advice is sought on all proposed changes within a curtilage to conserve heritage significance. 8. Recording and register update: Record changes at heritage places through adequate project records and archival photography. Notify all changes to the Section 170 Heritage & Conservation Register administrator upon project completion.

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Heritage Act - s.170 NSW State agency heritage registerSRA s.170 Register    

Study details

TitleYearNumberAuthorInspected byGuidelines used
State Rail Authority Heritage Register Study1999SRA69State Rail Authority  No
S170 Heritage & Conservation Register Update2009 City Plan Heritage  Yes
Heritage Platforms Conservation Management Strategy2015 Australian Museum Consulting  Yes
Railway Footbridges Heritage Conservation Strategy 2016 NSW Government Architect’s Office Heritage Group  Yes

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
WrittenAndrea Humphreys and Donald Ellsmore2001Inter-War Station Buildings
MapSharp, S.A1982The Railway Stations of NSW 1855-1980
WrittenVarious Various Plans from RailCorp EDMS

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

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Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: State Government
Database number: 4800268


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