Mount Victoria Railway Station Group | NSW Environment & Heritage

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Mount Victoria Railway Station Group

Item details

Name of item: Mount Victoria Railway Station Group
Type of item: Built
Group/Collection: Transport - Rail
Category: Railway Platform/ Station
Primary address: Station Street, Mount Victoria, NSW 2786
Parish: Hartley
County: Cook
Local govt. area: Blue Mountains

Boundary:

North: extension of the line of the northern boundary fence of the Barracks Building; South: north edge of Patrick Street overbridge (bridge not included); West: RailCorp property boundary to Station Street & Darling Causeway (includes park and gardens); East: RailCorp property boundary to Patrick Street (includes park and gardens).
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
Station StreetMount VictoriaBlue Mountains HartleyCookPrimary Address
Patrick Street Unknown  Alternate Address

Owner/s

Organisation NameOwner CategoryDate Ownership Updated
RailCorpState Government 
RailCorpState Government 
RailCorpState Government 

Statement of significance:

Mount Victoria Railway Station Group is of state significance as a large complex of buildings illustrating clearly the pattern of development of railway facilities in the Blue Mountains area. It is the most substantial railway station complex in the Blue Mountains and indicates the former importance of the location with the former locomotive depot (now demolished) to service terminating trains for railway tourism associated with Jenolan Caves and handling goods trains over the steep grades of the Blue Mountains, particularly the section to Lithgow. The structures indicate the importance of Mt Victoria as a health and holiday resort, the RRR accommodation provided in the station building reinforcing this.

The Mount Victoria Railway Station Group has a high degree of research potential for its ability to demonstrate construction techniques and architectural character of various types of buildings in one station. The station is a fine example of railway architecture including Victorian Regency and Federation buildings and is an important landmark in the townscape of Mt Victoria being located at the lower end of the town at the termination of the main street vista. The Mount Victoria Railway barracks is an unusual surviving example of a purpose built rest-house still used by the railways for staff accommodation. The signal box is one of a few examples of brick on platform elevated signal boxes that remain in operation in the state.

The overall aesthetic character of the station is further enhanced by the setting of the station within the rock escarpment, a typical natural setting of the Blue Mountains stations, featuring a collection of numerous flora ranging from mature trees, shrubs and potted plants along both platforms.

The Mount Victoria Railway Station is associated with John Whitton, Engineer-in-Chief of the NSW Railways, as the original station building was built to a design from his time, and with George Cowdery, Engineer-in-Chief for Existing Lines, as the two-level stone addition containing the Railway Refreshment Room was built under his supervision.

The footbridge is rare as an intact example of a standard Warren Truss trestle and stairway with channel iron stair stringers. The footbridge was identified as an item of exceptional heritage significance in the 2016 ‘Railway Footbridges Heritage Conservation Strategy’. The Mount Victoria Station footbridge has high integrity and intactness. The footbridge is rare as an intact example of a standard Warren Truss trestles and stairway with timber handrails, decorative timber newels and channel iron stair stringers.
Date significance updated: 21 Oct 16
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Designer/Maker: NSW Government Railways
Builder/Maker: 1868 building- Allan McClean and James Barrie
Construction years: 1868-1913
Physical description: BUILDINGS
Station Buildings:
- type 3, second class, sub-type 1, stone, platform 2 (1869) with Refreshment Room (1884)
- type 11, brick, platform 1 (1913)
Platform 1 Lavatory Block 1 (c1900)
Platform 2 Lavatory Block (c1900)
Signal Box - type E, 48 lever, brick on platform 2 (1911)
Barracks/Rest house, brick (1911-1913)
Site of Former SM’s Cottage (1868)

STRUCTURES
Platform 1, part stone & part brick faced (1870s)
Platform 2, brick faced (1911)
Footbridge (1911)
Other structures (various)

STATION BUILDING PLATFORM 2 (1869, 1884)
External: Constructed of stone with a slate roof the station building on Platform 2 is a 'type 3', second class station building altered to include refreshment rooms on the upper level with later brick extensions to both Up and Down ends. Its key features include a large two-storey central stone building flanked by attached stone and brick single-storey wing structures, a hipped slate roof to main building, gambrel roof to the Up end wing and flat roof to Down end wing, timber framed double-hung windows and timber panelled doors with standard iron brackets over decorative corbels supporting wide platform awnings, fretted timber work to both ends of awnings. The main two-storey central building features four tall brick chimneys with stone base and tops (one with chimney pot), bracketed eaves and segmental arched tall windows to the upper level. The single-storey sandstone south wing is part of the original station building with pitched slate roof and brick extension with corrugated metal gambrel roof and a brick chimney. The stone eaves of the original south wing are visible over the later platform awning. The south wing (ladies room) is a painted brick on the platform side and face brick on the car park side featuring tall face brick chimneys with corbelled tops and double-hung timber framed windows. An enclosed cantilevered balcony is located on the west side of the central wing, supported on cast iron brackets with iron lace (mostly removed). A ground floor brick and weatherboard skillion addition with a tall brick chimney is also located on the west side of the central wing.

Internal: The original layout of the station building in its extended form remains. The room arrangement on the ground floor includes combined station master’s office, ticket office and booking office, general waiting room, and ladies room. The upper level accommodates the local museum with entry via the rear staircase. The station refreshment rooms no longer function. The original internal finishes include decorative plaster ceiling and moulded plaster cornices to the waiting room and ladies waiting room, moulded timber architraves to original building joinery, plasterboard ceilings to amenities, and tile and carpet floorings. All fireplaces have been enclosed.

STATION BUILDING PLATFORM 1 (1913)
External: A single-storey building with slate gabled roof, gabled lantern roof to the centre and terracotta ridge capping. The walls are of face brick with black tuckpointed red brick jack arches to the openings. The walls have a brick plinth with red splay bricks. The south 5 bays are recessed with red bricks to the head of the recesses. The platform side of the building has timber framed double-hung windows with multi-paned upper sashes and double doors with coloured multi-pane fanlights. A double-hung ticket window is also located at the south end of the building. The building has various gabled wings at the rear. A cantilevered awning over the platform is supported on steel brackets on stanchions. It returns around the south side of the building and extends north to link with the lavatory building. A fretwork valance finishes the bay between the platform building and the lavatory. The half timber panelled gable end is visible behind the awnings.

Internal: The Platform 1 building is generally used by station staff and consists of two locked rooms and a general waiting room in the centre. The waiting room features decorative plaster ceiling, moulded timber architraves to window and door surrounds, a timber moulded dado above rendered dado line, timber skirting board and bricked in fireplace. Staff rooms were not accessible.

PLATFORM 1 LAVATORY BLOCK (c1911)
External: A single-storey face brick men’s lavatory building with a parapeted gable on the platform side featuring roughcast frieze between moulded string courses. The roof is of corrugated metal with exposed rafters. The other features include a four-panelled door with arched fanlight, a louvered/fixed window on the north side with segmental brick arch and decorative stone sill, and a double window on the platform elevation with louvered upper sashes, segmental arch and decorative stone sill.

Internal: Internally was not inspected.

PLATFORM 2 LAVATORY BLOCK (c1900)
External: A single storey face brick gabled building with a brick screen wall on the south side providing privacy to the men’s’ toilet entry. The building has a corrugated metal roof and plain bargeboards. The door and window openings have segmental arch lintels with louvers to the windows on east side and slots for ventilation in the gable ends.

Internal: Internally was not inspected.

SIGNAL BOX (1911)
External: A large two-storey face-brick and timber signal box with a corrugated iron gabled roof featuring simple bargeboards, turned timber finial and boxed eaves. The gable end is clad with rusticated weatherboards and has a timber vent. The signal box is located on the Platform 2 (Down side) with the floor level raised above platform level. It has 6-pane horizontal sliding band windows on the upper floor some with internal steel security mesh. There are 9-pane arched windows on the ground floor with rendered sills. Access is via steel stairs to a landing on the south elevation.

Internal: The signal box retains many of its original/early equipment within a refurbished and interiors including plasterboard panelled ceilings, modern light fittings, vinyl floor coverings, modern kitchen facility and cupboards. Early timber panelled walls in the store room still exist. The 48 lever interlocking machine is still in operation.

BARRACKS/REST HOUSE (1911 - 1913)
External: Located to the northeast of the station near No.26 Patrick Street, the barracks building is a single-storey gabled building on north-south axis with enclosed verandahs on the east and west elevations. The building is constructed of face brickwork, stretcher bond to the end walls, and Flemish bond under the verandahs. The gables have plain bargeboards with fretted timber boards to enclosed verandah ends. The large roof has been sheeted with corrugated metal. A large brick gable on the east side facing Patrick Street marks the original entry and is emphasized by a breakfront in the verandah. The verandah feature fibrocement panels to the bottom with brick base and band single-pane louvered windows to the upper portion. A brick chimney is located on the kitchen side of the building.

Internal: The floor layout of the barracks has been altered. An outer passageway exists, which was formally the verandah and external facades. Double-hung windows with simple concrete window sills, timber doors and simple face-brick walls are evident with ventilation grilles along the concrete base. The interior consists of six bedrooms, and a communal kitchen and lounge room area. Floors are tiled and modern florescent lights have been installed. Rooms have been recently refurbished with modern skirting boards, architraves, bathroom amenities, and kitchen facilities.

SITE OF FORMER STATION MASTER’S COTTAGE (1868)
The site of former Station Master’s Cottage was built in 1868 and was constructed of stone similar to the pointsman’s cottage at Glenbrook. The cottage was located a short distance to the south of the station and continued to be occupied by successive station masters until the twentieth century. It was demolished in 1934 when it became redundant and in poor condition due to vacancy for a long period. The site of the former cottage is now in a park named after Errol Barden, a Blue Mountains Shire Council employee who took a special interest in the environment of Mount Victoria.

PLATFORM 1 (1870)
Platform 1 is a curved side platform and constructed of part stone and part brick faced with concrete deck and asphalt finish. Platform originally coursed sandstone with battered profile. Surface shows evidence of cement render, particularly towards bottom of wall; render has been shaved off at top of wall. Platform has been raised with concrete slab. Stonework has been heavily cutback with mechanical tools and some blocks are in poor condition, including evidence of major cracking and missing pieces. Platform has been extended twice at City end, first in brick with corbelled coping, second with steel rail post and concrete panel with cantilever coping. Section with brick corbelled coping has been cut back and made straight. Deck is a patchwork of concrete slabs of various ages. The platform is highly vegetated along the eastern side rocky escarpments with various mature trees, shrubs and potted plants along the length of the platform, bush rock garden beds and timber garden beds. The platform also features period and modern light fittings, timber bench seating, bubbler, drain, historic furniture, a number of early and modern signage and aluminium palisade fencing to both ends of the platform.

PLATFORM 2 (1911)
Platform 2 is a roadside platform and constructed of brick faced with concrete deck and asphalt finish. It was widened at the time of duplication and the addition of the new awning. This platform is also highly vegetated with various mature trees, shrubs and potted plants along the length of the platform. It also features period and modern light fittings, timber bench seating, early and modern signage, an early bubbler and aluminium palisade fencing to both ends and along the street side of the platform. Platform brickwork, laid in English bond, with corbelled coping and weepholes. Brickwork has been patched in some places with different bonds. Platform has been extended to City end with steel rail post and concrete panels cast in situ. Platform has been raised with cantilevered concrete coping. Level bay retains signal cabling. Wall vents in platform building partially covered when platform was raised. Deck is a patchwork of concrete slabs of various ages.


FOOTBRIDGE (1911)
The footbridge is a standard Warren truss trestle and stairway with Hardie board long plank timber deck and channel iron stair stringers. The railing is supported on curved mild steel brackets. The footbridge connects both platforms and as the station is situated in a cutting, it extends on one side to the top of the embankment to connect to Patrick Street in the east and Station Street to the west. The balustrades to the stairs are timber post and handrail with wire mesh infill while the sides of the bridge enclosed with corrugated metal sheeting.

MOVEABLE ITEMS
All station signage
Platform Lighting - pendant style period pole lighting in group of two or one pendants with decorative brackets and pole base
Bubblers on both platforms
Seth Thomas brand clock ID # 2418 in the signal box
48 lever interlocking frame, CTC panel, signal tools, emergency board and equipment, boarded fireplace & chimney breast, glass fronted framed notice board, framed signal information board, 1956 book shelf and supports in the signal box
2 x L-shaped early timber seats in the Platform 1 waiting room
Early iron W and T Avery scale outside of SM’s office on Platform 2
Period timber bench seats on both platforms
All early station signage throughout the station
Set of two of timber rollover indicator boards, one with a foot pedal, still in use (in 2015)
Cast iron and concrete flower pots on platforms
Cast iron c1980s platform benches – on platform
Refreshment Room stove exhaust hood and chimney and oven rungs
Sections of timber Refreshment Room counter bar
Station timetable – green framed sign
Window pelmet with RRR
Timber ticket box
Timber cabinet
Timber desk shelves, painted cream
Two red steel boxes
Timber bench/settle
Timber chair
Two metal waste bins with curved lids
Two electric staff machines
Metal urn with lid, handles, tap and flue
Trike on display rails
Cast iron signal frame, signal mast on display in grounds
Cast iron stormwater grates and vents throughout station
Cast iron and concrete door grilles
Timber fire surrounds, grates and tiled hearths
Fitted RRR timber shelving
Fitted waiting room seating
Board for keys with painted numbers
High-level concrete, ceramic and stainless steel cisterns in men’s toilets, including chains, wall supports and piping
Loose signage in storage
Cast iron sinks
Early light fittings and switches on timber mounting blocks
Early timber office desk with turned legs and two drawers
Collection of wrought iron platform benches with “Mt Victoria” painted lettering – in storage
Cast iron bath tub
Brown moulded plastic seat from waiting room
Platform trolleys - several
Parcel weighing scales mounted on Down platform

LANDSCAPE FEATURES
The setting of the station within the rock escarpment is the typical natural setting of the Blue Mountains stations. The station features a numerous collection of flora ranging from mature trees, shrubs and potted plants along both platforms, adding to the historic character of the station group.

POTENTIAL ARCHAEOLOGICAL FEATURES
There are no known potential archaeological elements on the station. However, a number of remnant sidings, levers and giants from the earlier electrification system exist along the rock escarpment of Platform 1 and may have archaeological potential. The site of the former SM’s cottage also has archaeological potential.
Physical condition and/or
Archaeological potential:
Platform 1 Station Building - Good
Platform 2 Station Building - Generally Good Condition (cement render at the bottom of the stone walls detrimental to the stone walls)
Lavatory Blocks - Very Good externally
Signal Box - Very good
Barracks/Rest House - Generally in Good condition
Site of former SM's cottage - not inspected
Platforms - Good
Footbridge - Generally Good with evidence of natural wear & rusting
Date condition updated:09 Sep 08
Modifications and dates: 1868 - 1884: Platform 2 station building extended to provide refreshment rooms with extended awning, rear awning removed
1891: Minor renovations and extension to awning of Platform 2 station building.
1898: Additions and repairs to Platform 2 station building.
1902: Improvements to Platform 2 station building.
1993: Internal upgrade works to Platform 1 and Platform 2 station buildings
N.d: Ticket window at south end of Platform 1 station building bricked up and the cantilevered balcony has most cast iron removed and is infilled with fibro and louvred windows.
N.d: Flush doors added to barracks building, internal layout altered, and the verandah enclosed with fibro and louvres.
Further information: OTHER STRUCTURES
Located within the curtilage are various other 20th Century subsidiary structures, that have not been assessed as part of this listing. These include:

Carport/Gangshed - clad in sheet metal (Down side)
Section Hut - concrete drop-slab x 2 (Down side)
Decant Pump Shelter (Down side)
Possible Traction-section Hut (south of barracks)
Cleaners Amenities Building (north of barracks)
Current use: Railway Station, Signal Box, guest/staff accommodation
Former use: Railway Station, Signal Box, Barracks

History

Historical notes: Mount Victoria has always been an important railway centre since its opening in 1868. It was the first platform structure made of material other than timber built after Penrith station. The original station building still remains and was to a design consistent with the time of John Whitton, Engineer-in-Chief of the NSW Railways. Further additions were carried out in 1899 to the ladies’ toilet and other areas. The parcels office was added in 1911 to the Sydney end of the building.

In 1884, the two level stone addition containing the Railway Refreshment Room was built under the supervision of George Cowdery, Engineer-in-Chief for Existing Lines and was built by George Dengate. The Refreshment Room contained on the upper level eight bedrooms for travellers and quarters for the Manager and family, again typical of NSW practice. Alterations to the Refreshment Room occurred in 1919 and additional bedrooms were built at the rear in 1943. The Refreshment Room closed in 1957.

A locomotive depot existed at Mount Victoria in 1897 and was greatly expanded in 1911-13 when duplication of the line through Mount Victoria was completed. The depot was home to the locomotives and crews who worked the famous ‘The Fish’ commuter train to Sydney. Mount Victoria also was the destination of the Caves Express from Sydney, which conveyed holidaymakers to the Blue Mountains.

The construction of accommodation for enginemen, train guards and other on-board staff has been provided by the NSW Government Railways from the 1880s. In the late 1890s, a standard design of barracks was approved. Those at Mount Victoria reflected a standard arrangement with rows of four bedrooms on each side of the building. There was also a central kitchen and meal room, reflected in the roofscape by a large transverse gable. A toilet and Attendant’s Room completed the plan. It continues also to be used for non-overnight purposes, for meals and locker accommodation.

Also on the Lithgow-bound platform is an elevated signal box. It was constructed in 1911 and continues in service (2009). It is built to the typical elevated signal box design dominant between 1910 and 1920.

A free-standing male toilet was built towards the western end of the Lithgow-bound platform in 1900. The verandah posts which supported the original platform awnings on the Lithgow-bound platform were removed in 1927. This was part of a programme to modernise the appearance of platform buildings by the use of large brackets which had begun in the 1890s under Chief Commissioner, E.M.G. Eddy.

The present Sydney-bound platform was built to serve the duplication west to Hartley in 1911, and the present buildings provided. It featured a second Railway Refreshment Room with the traditional lantern roof, which closed in 1957. The 1911 Up platform building is roofed with slates. This is possibly the last station to utilise slates as a roofing material.

The station’s history is closely linked to Jenolan Caves. The station was the destination for the famous ‘Caves Express’ which operated between the 1920s and 1942 conveying holidaymakers to the Blue Mountains. It was also the nightly destination of the famous ‘The Fish’ train from Sydney. It was the only destination on the NSW railway system to have two named trains terminate one for commuters and the other for tourists.

The pedestrian footbridge linking both platforms was of truss form and built in 1911, replacing an earlier c.1896 bridge. It is largely in original condition and is typical of the design used throughout the NSW railway system.

A Station Master's Cottage was also constructed in 1868 and was similar to another 11 residences on the Blue Mountains built in stone. The structure was demolished over 30 years ago but the keystone showing the date of construction is still extant. It is now located in the Baden Powell Park, Mount Victoria. The history of the cottage is important as it illustrates that residences not always reflected the status of the occupant. In this case, the Station Master received the same type and size structure as did Gatekeepers on the line.

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Communication-Activities relating to the creation and conveyance of information Signalling and safe working-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Tourism-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Transport-Activities associated with the moving of people and goods from one place to another, and systems for the provision of such movements Building the railway network-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Servicing and accomodating railway employees-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Servicing and accomodating passengers-

Assessment of significance

SHR Criteria a)
[Historical significance]
The historical importance of Mount Victoria Railway Station Group as a railway location is demonstrated by a variety of high quality buildings which clearly show the development of the Station over time, particularly between 1872 and 1912, illustrating clearly the growth and decline of railway facilities in the Blue Mountains area. Mt Victoria was a convenient place to construct a locomotive facility (now demolished) to service terminating trains to serve railway tourism associated with the Jenolan Caves and handling goods trains over the steep grades of the Blue Mountains, particularly the section to Lithgow. The structures indicate the importance of Mt Victoria as a health and holiday resort, the Railway Refreshment Rooms and accommodation provided in the station building reinforcing this. The Mount Victoria Railway Rest-House (Barracks) is associated with the duplication of the railway line over the Blue Mountains in 1910 and is significant for its continued use as accommodation. The Station Group is the most substantial railway station complex in the Blue Mountains, demonstrating clear layers of growth from its original construction as a terminus station, through its growth at the turn of the century to the duplication of the railway line.
SHR Criteria b)
[Associative significance]
The Mount Victoria Railway Station is associated with John Whitton, Engineer-in-Chief of the NSW Railways, as the original Station building was built to a design from his time, and with George Cowdery, Engineer-in-Chief for Existing Lines, as the two-level stone addition containing the Railway Refreshment Room was built under his supervision.
SHR Criteria c)
[Aesthetic significance]
The Mount Victoria Railway Station Group is of aesthetic significance for its cohesive group of Victorian Regency and Federation buildings and is an important landmark in the townscape of Mt Victoria, being located at the lower end of the town at the termination of the main street vista.

While contemporary with the majority of station buildings surviving on the Blue Mountains railway line, the Platform 1 building and adjoining lavatory building do not derive from the standard pattern used for those buildings as it has been built for a side platform rather than an island platform. It has high quality detailing with its brick detailing, clearstory window and use or roughcast render.

The signal box on Platform 2 is a representative example of its type, adapted to suit the side platform rather than the more typical island platform. It is a well detailed building designed and orientated to maximize views of the lines in each direction. The Mount Victoria barracks has a simple gabled form with wide verandahs and has been modified significantly yet still provides an example of a former rest-house facility established within close proximity of the railway line.

The overall aesthetic character of the station is further enhanced by the setting of the station within the rock escarpment, a typical natural setting of the Blue Mountains stations, featuring a collection of numerous flora ranging from mature trees, shrubs and potted plants along both platforms.
SHR Criteria d)
[Social significance]
The place has the potential to contribute to the local community's sense of place, and can provide a connection to the local community's past.
SHR Criteria e)
[Research potential]
The Mount Victoria Railway Station Group has a high degree of research potential for its demonstrative ability in providing construction techniques and architectural character of various types of buildings in one station. The station building on Platform 2 is of particular research significance for its staged construction over time to accommodate different staff and passenger needs. The site of the former SM’s cottage also has archaeological potential.
SHR Criteria f)
[Rarity]
The Mount Victoria Station group is a rare Victorian era railway station combining a number of individually significant buildings and structures. The signal box is one of a few brick on platform signal boxes remaining in the state. The Railway Refreshment Rooms, though no longer used for their original purpose, are rare examples of such railway facility associated with the station’s important location.

The barracks are relatively rare in the metro area (8 in 2009) though at least 37 remain in NSW. While of later construction it is representative of the late 1890’s standard design of rest-house that provided accommodation to railway staff.

The footbridge is rare as an intact example of a standard Warren Truss trestles and stairway with timber handrails, decorative timber newels, Hardie Board long plank timber deck and channel iron stair stringers - as almost all similar footbridges have been replaced with concrete.
SHR Criteria g)
[Representativeness]
Mount Victoria Railway Station Group is a representative example of a substantial railway station complex combining various types, periods and styles of buildings dating from the 19th Century and early 20th Century, each individually representing their standard designs and types.

The footbridge was identified as an item of exceptional heritage significance in the 2016 ‘Railway Footbridges Heritage Conservation Strategy’. The Mount Victoria Station footbridge has high integrity and intactness.

The barracks, although modified still demonstrates the key characteristics of standard accommodation for railway staff constructed during the early 20th Century.
Integrity/Intactness: The overall integrity of the station and its buildings is high. The majority of the buildings at the station are intact with minor changes to their exteriors. Although modified, the barracks maintains their overall integrity at a moderate level. The footbridge has high integrity and intactness.
Assessment criteria: Items are assessed against the PDF State Heritage Register (SHR) Criteria to determine the level of significance. Refer to the Listings below for the level of statutory protection.

Recommended management:

1. Conservation principles: Conserve cultural heritage significance and minimise impacts on heritage values and fabric in accordance with the ‘Australia ICOMOS Charter for Places of Cultural Significance’. 2. Specialist advice: Seek advice from a qualified heritage specialist during all phases of a proposed project from feasibility, concept and option planning stage; detailed design; heritage approval and assessment; through to construction and finalisation. 3. Documentation: Prepare a Statement of Heritage Impact (SOHI) to assess, minimise and prevent heritage impacts as part of the assessment and approval phase of a project. Prepare a Conservation Management Plan (CMP) prior to proposing major works (such as new additions, change of use or proposed demolition) at all places of State significance and all complex sites of Local significance. 4. Maintenance and repair: Undertake annual inspections and proactive routine maintenance works to conserve heritage fabric in accordance with the ‘Minimum Standards of Maintenance & Repair’. 5. Movable heritage: Retain in situ and care for historic contents, fixtures, fittings, equipment and objects which contribute to cultural heritage significance. Return or reinstate missing features or relocated items where opportunities arise. 6. Aboriginal, archaeology and natural heritage: Consider all aspects of potential heritage significance as part of assessing and minimising potential impacts, including Aboriginal, archaeology and natural heritage. 7. Unidentified heritage items: Heritage inventory sheets do not describe or capture all contributory heritage items within an identified curtilage (such as minor buildings, structures, archaeology, landscape elements, movable heritage and significant interiors and finishes). Ensure heritage advice is sought on all proposed changes within a curtilage to conserve heritage significance. 8. Recording and register update: Record changes at heritage places through adequate project records and archival photography. Notify all changes to the Section 170 Heritage & Conservation Register administrator upon project completion.

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Heritage Act - s.170 NSW State agency heritage registerMount Victoria Railway Station group    

Study details

TitleYearNumberAuthorInspected byGuidelines used
review of existing infrastructure2006 Stuart sharp and Bob Taaffe  Yes
State Rail Authority Heritage Register Study1999SRA7, SRA718 (footbridge)State Rail Authority  No
Heritage Platforms Conservation Management Strategy2015 Australian Museum Business Services  Yes
S170 Heritage & Conservation Register Update2009 City Plan Heritage  Yes
Heritage Platforms Conservation Management Strategy2015 Australian Museum Consulting  Yes
Railway Footbridges Heritage Conservation Strategy 2016 NSW Government Architect’s Office Heritage Group  Yes

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
WrittenARHS2009Historical information prepared for S170 update project
WrittenCMR Consultants2000Victoria Development Strategy, vol. 1
WrittenCroft and Walker1982Heritage Study, Blue Mountains
WrittenDavies, Paul1978A History of New South Wales Railway Architecture 1890-1915
WrittenFraser, D1996Survey of Railway Footbridges
WrittenJack, R.I, University of Sydney1999Blue Mountains Heritage Register Review
WrittenR. Love, Railway Historian2008Personal communication, 10th November
WrittenSharp, S.A1982The Railway Stations of NSW 1855-1980
WrittenSingleton, C. C1949Australasian Railway and Locomotive Historical Society Bulletin, vol. 23, 143, Sept
WrittenTaaffe, R.T1990The Use and Selection of Materials in Railway Signal Box Construction 1912-1990
WrittenTropman and Tropman1992Heritage Study Review, Blue Mountains

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

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Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: State Government
Database number: 4801007


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