Mulgrave Railway Residence | NSW Environment & Heritage

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Mulgrave Railway Residence

Item details

Name of item: Mulgrave Railway Residence
Type of item: Built
Group/Collection: Transport - Rail
Category: Railway Platform/ Station
Primary address: 122 Mulgrave Road, Mulgrave, NSW 2756
Local govt. area: Hawkesbury

Boundary:

North, West & South: Garden boundaries defined by the existing trees; East: Boundary with Mulgrave Rd including car park.
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
122 Mulgrave RoadMulgraveHawkesbury  Primary Address

Owner/s

Organisation NameOwner CategoryDate Ownership Updated
RailCorpState Government 
RailCorpState Government 
RailCorpState Government 

Statement of significance:

Mulgrave Railway Residence is of local significance as it was constructed as the original 1860s combined station/ residence building at Mulgrave prior to construction of new facilities and relocation of the station in 1912. The residence is a relatively rare example of a mid-19th Century railway office/residence building demonstrating early railway design and the past custom of providing accommodation for railway staff. The original form of the Mulgrave residence is consistent with other residences of the 1860s, however, early alterations to the building have altered the structure as such it is a unique structure on the NSW railways. The building, however, has lost its integrity and intactness due to later alterations and modifications in particular loss of internal features over the years.
Date significance updated: 18 Mar 09
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Designer/Maker: NSW Government Railways
Builder/Maker: NSW Government Railways
Construction years: 1869-
Physical description: BUILDINGS
Station Master's residence (type 11), 122 Mulgrave Road, (1869)

STATION MASTER'S RESIDENCE (1869)
External: The 1869 Station Master's residence is visible down the line on the opposite side of the tracks. The presence of one wall on the rail corridor boundary may be explained by the previous location of a ticket office in the building with a connected timber platform that is no longer extant.

The original building is constructed of hand and machine made bricks with later additions to the rear dating from the 1880s. Originally, the design followed that in vogue in the 1860s but the 1880s additions have altered the roofscape to the point that the structure appears atypical. Its double gable roof with box gutter appears to be unique on the railway system. The other architectural features of the Mulgrave Station Master's residence are consistent with other residences of the 1860s. It is a painted brick construction with corrugated metal gabled roof and ogee style corrugated metal veranda supported on timber posts with a timber floor on brick piers and timber picket balustrade. The building is elevated and accessed via six step stairs. Multiple face brick chimneys with corbelled tops (some with metal pots) dominate the roofscape. Few of the timber framed sash windows feature timber hoods and are boarded.

Internal: The residence internally presents a shell like appearance with the majority of its finishes and features removed. The floors are timber board with carpet finish and the ceilings are fibrocement sheeted linings. Some of the timber joinery including multi-paned windows, moulded architraves and panelled doors survive. All fireplaces and surrounds have either been removed or adapted to electric heating.
Physical condition and/or
Archaeological potential:
The uninhabited Station Master's residence, having suffered damage from fire 10 years ago, is in moderate condition externally. Many of the external issues appear to be generally related to lack of maintenance and repair. Internally, the building is in poor condition with deteriorated architraves, window frames, flaking paint, damaged linings, wall cracking and general maintenance issues. A number of internal finishes and decorative elements such as fireplace surrounds and skirtings have been removed or damaged.
Date condition updated:19 Mar 09
Modifications and dates: 1869 - Combined office/residence to a residence constructed, possessing a ticket office and was connected to a timber platform.
Pre-1900 - the ticket window openings in the wall adjacent to the railway line were closed and a separate ticket office opened on the platform.
8 Dec 1912 - New platform constructed and station buildings re-erected, with the originally combined office/ residence becoming a residence only.
Current use: Disused residence
Former use: Railway residence

History

Historical notes: Two routes to Windsor were proposed in 1846 for the introduction of railways into the Colony of NSW. The line was built as the first line to be operated as a horse-drawn tramway. In 1856 a petition for the establishment of a railway from the residents of Windsor and Richmond had been presented to the Government. In 1860 a grant of £57,000 was approved for a railway between Blacktown and Windsor. In the following year it was increased to £60,000 for a railway between Blacktown and Richmond. Contracts for earthworks, permanent ways and bridges were let from 1862 to William Randle & G Gibbons on 11 December 1862. The contract was taken over by Messrs Iredale & McNamara on 28 September 1863.

The Richmond line opened on 29 November 1864 by Governor Sir John Young as a rural branch line in response to the area's success as a farming district and its location at the intersection of two stock routes. A pilot engine was run before all passenger trains for safety. The original stations were Riverstone, Mulgrave, Windsor and Richmond. Upgrade to the track took place in the late nineteenth century. A major upgrading of most stations on the line occurred in the 1880s.

The early decades of the 20th century brought further improvements and upgrades to the line. For example, the establishment of Richmond air-force base in 1925 resulted in increased use of the line. In 1938 congestion at Clarendon Station caused by a RAAF Air Show resulted in extensive improvements. All station platforms were increased to 450 feet and additional facilities were installed at Richmond.

The first station building was opened at Mulgrave on 1 December 1864 and was located to the west of the level crossing and housed in the extant combined residence/office (constructed 1869) for the Station Master. The original building is constructed of hand and machine made bricks with later additions to the rear dating from the 1880s. Originally, the design followed that in vogue in the 1860s but the 1880s additions have altered the roofscape to the point that the structure appears atypical. Nevertheless, the architectural features of the Mulgrave structure are consistent with other residences of the 1860s and it is one of the oldest surviving railway structures on the NSW railway system.

By 1900, the original brick residence was no longer used as an office and separate timber structures were erected on the platform. At this time the ticket window openings in the wall of the original building adjacent to the railway line were closed-in due to the separate ticket office opening on the platform. In that year, the original structure became a residence only.

By 1912, the station site was relocated to the east of the level crossing and all the timber platform buildings were moved to their present position. In 1939, the platform was converted from a side to an island platform. Only two structures of the early station survive and these are joined together. They are the 1912 signal box and an out-of shed, built in 1901. Both have skillion roofs and these have taken on an ungainly appearance since the conversion of the platform. Both structures reflect the dominant design styles of the period and are rare surviving examples. The interlocking frame has been removed from the signal box.

The line was electrified in 1991 and this prompted the demolition of the main platform building c1999 which was replaced by a temporary shed.

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Servicing and accomodating railway employees-

Assessment of significance

SHR Criteria a)
[Historical significance]
The Station Master's residence, built in conjunction with the opening of the line, if of historical significance as one of the oldest surviving railway structures on the NSW Railway system and therefore provides an opportunity to understand the history of the provision of facilities for railway workers in its earliest phase. The residence is if significance as it was constructed as the original 1860s combined station/ residence building at Mulgrave prior to construction of new facilities and relocation of the station in 1912.
SHR Criteria c)
[Aesthetic significance]
The Station Master's residence is aesthetically significant as an unusual example that can not be classified by standard designs. The double gable roof of the residence contrasts with the skillion roofed, simple design of the timber platform structures at the nearby station. The original form of the Mulgrave residence is consistent with other residences of the 1860s, however, early alterations to the building have altered the structure as such it is a unique structure on the NSW railways. The building however, has lost its integrity and intactness due to later alterations and modifications in particular loss of internal features over the years.
SHR Criteria d)
[Social significance]
The place has the potential to contribute to the local community's sense of place and can provide a connection to the local community's history.
SHR Criteria e)
[Research potential]
The residence has high research potential due to its rarity as one of the earliest structures on the Richmond line and in NSW, which pre-dates standard railway designs. The residence provides an opportunity to consider the earliest building techniques used in construction of the Richmond line.
SHR Criteria f)
[Rarity]
The residence is a relatively rare example of a mid-19th Century railway office/residence building demonstrating early railway design and the past custom of providing accommodation for railway staff.
Integrity/Intactness: The residence has lost original fabric in terms of details such as fireplaces, but retains the overall integrity and intactness of the structure.
Assessment criteria: Items are assessed against the PDF State Heritage Register (SHR) Criteria to determine the level of significance. Refer to the Listings below for the level of statutory protection.

Recommended management:

1. Conservation principles: Conserve cultural heritage significance and minimise impacts on heritage values and fabric in accordance with the ‘Australia ICOMOS Charter for Places of Cultural Significance’. 2. Specialist advice: Seek advice from a qualified heritage specialist during all phases of a proposed project from feasibility, concept and option planning stage; detailed design; heritage approval and assessment; through to construction and finalisation. 3. Documentation: Prepare a Statement of Heritage Impact (SOHI) to assess, minimise and prevent heritage impacts as part of the assessment and approval phase of a project. Prepare a Conservation Management Plan (CMP) prior to proposing major works (such as new additions, change of use or proposed demolition) at all places of State significance and all complex sites of Local significance. 4. Maintenance and repair: Undertake annual inspections and proactive routine maintenance works to conserve heritage fabric in accordance with the ‘Minimum Standards of Maintenance & Repair’. 5. Movable heritage: Retain in situ and care for historic contents, fixtures, fittings, equipment and objects which contribute to cultural heritage significance. Return or reinstate missing features or relocated items where opportunities arise. 6. Aboriginal, archaeology and natural heritage: Consider all aspects of potential heritage significance as part of assessing and minimising potential impacts, including Aboriginal, archaeology and natural heritage. 7. Unidentified heritage items: Heritage inventory sheets do not describe or capture all contributory heritage items within an identified curtilage (such as minor buildings, structures, archaeology, landscape elements, movable heritage and significant interiors and finishes). Ensure heritage advice is sought on all proposed changes within a curtilage to conserve heritage significance. 8. Recording and register update: Record changes at heritage places through adequate project records and archival photography. Notify all changes to the Section 170 Heritage & Conservation Register administrator upon project completion.

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Heritage Act - s.170 NSW State agency heritage registerSRA s.170 Register    

Study details

TitleYearNumberAuthorInspected byGuidelines used
State Rail Authority Heritage Register Study1999SRA27State Rail Authority  No
Heritage and Conservation Register State Rail Authority of NSW1993260Paul Davies for SRA  No
S170 Heritage & Conservation Register Update2009 City Plan Heritage  Yes

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
WrittenDavies, D.1998Mulgrave Station Photographic Recording
WrittenEllsmore, D2004Mulgrave Railway Station Investigation of Paint Finishes
WrittenSimpson Dawbin2004Mulgrave Station Master’s Residence Heritage Impact Statement

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

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Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: State Government
Database number: 4801027


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