Pymble Railway Station Group | NSW Environment & Heritage

Culture and heritage

Heritage

Pymble Railway Station Group

Item details

Name of item: Pymble Railway Station Group
Type of item: Built
Group/Collection: Transport - Rail
Category: Railway Platform/ Station
Primary address: Grandview Street, Pymble, NSW 2073
Local govt. area: Ku-Ring-Gai

Boundary:

North: the property boundary;South: the property boundary;East: 5m from end of platform;West: eastern edge of the road overbridge (excluding bridge).
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
Grandview StreetPymbleKu-Ring-Gai  Primary Address

Owner/s

Organisation NameOwner CategoryDate Ownership Updated
RailCorpState Government 
RailCorpState Government 
RailCorpState Government 

Statement of significance:

Pymble Railway Station Group is significant at a local level. Pymble station, opened in 1890, has historical significance as there was limited settlement in the area prior to this date and the construction of the railway was instrumental in encouraging the rapid subdivision and development of the area. Pymble railway station has aesthetic significance at a local level as a good example of a standard design station building in its original context, dating from the 1909 duplication works. The site has aesthetic significance in particular due to its well-known landmark qualities, particularly the elevated footbridge which forms an important visual element of the station precinct viewed both from the Pacific Highway and from Grandview Street.

The footbridge was identified as an item of high heritage significance in the 2016 ‘Railway Footbridges Heritage Conservation Strategy’. It retains a high degree of integrity and is a good representative of an early twentieth century haunched beam footbridge with a trestle sub-structure. It is unusual in that it retains its original balustrades on both the footbridge and stairs.
Date significance updated: 21 Oct 16
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Designer/Maker: New South Wales Department of Railways
Builder/Maker: New South Wales Department of Railways
Physical description: Station Building, type 11(standard A10) (1909)
Footbridge (1910)
Platform (1909)
Moveable

CONTEXT
Pymble Railway Station is located within quite a busy suburban setting in a small cutting between the Pacific Highway and Grandview Street and contains a single island platform, station building and an original footbridge at the southern end of the platform. The sharp fall of Grandview Street means that whilst the northern end of the platform is found within a cutting, the southern end is in fact above street level, giving the footbridge added prominence in the streetscape.

STATION BUILDING
External: Pymble Station building is an example of a Type A10 standard design station building. The building is of red face brick, tuck pointed, with moulded render string course, architraves and window sills. The gabled roof is of corrugated iron. Cast iron cantilevered brackets support the timber framed awning. The building has timber gable ends, barge boards and valances. Two brick chimneys with rendered cornice (one retaining a pot) are located along the ridge line. The eastern end of the roofline has been extended by one bay to form a covered area above the ticket window. This structure continues the detail of the station building with cantilevered brackets and timber valance.

Internal: Internally, Pymble Station retains much original fabric, although the original layout has been altered with smaller spaces combined to form larger ones. Walls are rendered and include a raised dado and decorative air vents. Mini-orb ceilings feature roses and plaster cornices. Floors are of timber and have been carpeted. The majority of doors and windows retain their original joinery, including panels of coloured glass. Fireplaces have been infilled. The Ladies Waiting Room has had a division inserted and a new ceiling installed, yet original toilets partitions and configuration still exists. Shelving and roof access in the northern storeroom has been fire damaged.

FOOTBRIDGE
A two bay footbridge giving access to the platform from both sides of the station is located at the southern end of the platform. The footbridge is of typical steel girder construction. New precast concrete floor and stair treads are supported by the original steel joists and bearers, whilst a new steel roof and side panels added in 1993 has reduced the simple quality of the footbridge, but improved it as an amenity. Handrails are original. Newel posts are of the knob pattern type, only known to be in two other locations on the line, Mount Colah and Wahroonga. The footbridge is unusual in that it contains steel from two different manufacturers, namely Dorman Long & Co of Middlesbrough and Frodingham Iron & Steel Co from England.

PLATFORM (c1909)
The island platform dates from the same time period as the station (c.1909). It is an island platform with brick faces and has an asphalt platform surface. There are some plantings at the northern end of the platform.

MOVEABLE HERITAGE
Milner's Patent Fire Resisting type safe (operational); original wall mounted circuit phone board with "No.2 North Circuit" card still intact. Indicator boards are still mounted to the exterior wall adjacent to the ticket window.
Physical condition and/or
Archaeological potential:
Station - Pymble Railway Station is in good condition externally, being well maintained to an appropriate level.
Footbridge - Good.
Platform - Good.
Date condition updated:09 Sep 08
Modifications and dates: c1993: footbridge upgraded and covered
N.d: Some relatively minor modifications to station building, including opening of divided spaces.
2017: Bird Proofing, Landscaping improvements, Toilet refurbishments, Lighting LED replacements – All Vandalux and Pole top lights fittings replaced to LED fittings, KOP – Seats and Bins changed in accordance with KOP Catalogue.
Current use: Railway Station
Former use: Nil

History

Historical notes: The ‘North Shore’ of Sydney can be defined as a relatively narrow strip of land extending from Milson’s Point to Waitara, a distance of approximately 20km.

In 1887, tenders were called for construction of a branch line extending south from Hornsby to the North Shore. The 16.8km section between Hornsby and St. Leonard’s was opened on 1 January 1890. Stations provided at the opening of the line included Chatswood and St. Leonard’s. A single line was constructed at the time. The line between St. Leonard’s and Milson’s Point (the terminus at the edge of the harbour) was completed 1 May 1893.

Pymble Railway Station was opened on 1 January 1890, the date when the line between Hornsby and St. Leonard’s was opened. A single platform was built on the-then single line on the Down or western-side of the line.

Duplication came to this section of the North Shore line in 1909 and a new island platform was built on a new site a short distance closer to Hornsby. A standard island-platform style building constructed in brick was built on the new platform. The old platform was completely removed. A new footbridge was provided at the Milson’s Point end of the building with access to the platform being provided by stairs. A goods siding with goods shed was provided on the Down side of the line. At the time of opening of the island platform, all signals, points and crossovers were controlled by a signal lever frame situated under the platform awning at the Milson’s Point end of the building.

Electrification of the North Shore line was opened in 1927, with full electric services in 1928. Automatic signalling followed and most signal boxes on the line were closed, including Pymble. The goods siding was removed in 1940.

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Transport-Activities associated with the moving of people and goods from one place to another, and systems for the provision of such movements Building the railway network-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Impacts of railways on urban form-

Assessment of significance

SHR Criteria a)
[Historical significance]
Pymble Railway Station is historically significant at a local level. Although there was limited settlement in the area prior to this date, the construction of the railway was instrumental in encouraging the rapid subdivision and development of the area. The present building and island platform was built on a site slightly north of the original platform following the duplication of the line in 1909.
SHR Criteria c)
[Aesthetic significance]
Pymble Railway Station has aesthetic significance at a local level. The building is a good example of a standard (type A10) design station building in its original context. The building's form, fabric and details are typical of railway stations of the period and is similar to other rail buildings of the late nineteenth and early twentieth century in the Sydney region. The site has aesthetic significance in particular due to its well-known landmark qualities, particularly the elevated footbridge which forms an important visual element of the station precinct viewed both from the Pacific Highway and from Grandview Street. Like many stations, the grouping of the station building, platforms and bridge create an aesthetically pleasing set of railway infrastructure that is able to evoke a former era of travel.
SHR Criteria d)
[Social significance]
The place has the potential to contribute to the local community's sense of place and can provide a connection to the local community's history.
SHR Criteria e)
[Research potential]
The archaeological research potential of the site is low. There may be some evidence of the former (1890) platform located to the south of the present platform, but this is unlikely to yield any significant new information about the construction of late nineteenth century station platform design and construction, there being many extant platforms of this kind on the network.
SHR Criteria g)
[Representativeness]
The platform building, platform and footbridge are representative of structures built at Sydney railway stations between 1892 and 1929, particularly the period between 1909 and 1917 and on the Northern line. Despite later modifications and a resulting loss of integrity, as a group they are good examples of their type and are able to evoke a former era of railway travel.

The footbridge was identified as an item of high heritage significance in the 2016 ‘Railway Footbridges Heritage Conservation Strategy’. It retains a high degree of integrity and is a good representative of an early twentieth century haunched beam footbridge with a trestle sub-structure. It is unusual in that it retains its original balustrades on both the footbridge and stairs.
Integrity/Intactness: Pymble is a relatively intact railway station group and possesses a moderate level of integrity. Although both the platform building and the footbridge have been subject to upgrading works, these have generally been carried out in a way that does not detract severely from the heritage significance of the place.
Assessment criteria: Items are assessed against the PDF State Heritage Register (SHR) Criteria to determine the level of significance. Refer to the Listings below for the level of statutory protection.

Recommended management:

1. Conservation principles: Conserve cultural heritage significance and minimise impacts on heritage values and fabric in accordance with the ‘Australia ICOMOS Charter for Places of Cultural Significance’. 2. Specialist advice: Seek advice from a qualified heritage specialist during all phases of a proposed project from feasibility, concept and option planning stage; detailed design; heritage approval and assessment; through to construction and finalisation. 3. Documentation: Prepare a Statement of Heritage Impact (SOHI) to assess, minimise and prevent heritage impacts as part of the assessment and approval phase of a project. Prepare a Conservation Management Plan (CMP) prior to proposing major works (such as new additions, change of use or proposed demolition) at all places of State significance and all complex sites of Local significance. 4. Maintenance and repair: Undertake annual inspections and proactive routine maintenance works to conserve heritage fabric in accordance with the ‘Minimum Standards of Maintenance & Repair’. 5. Movable heritage: Retain in situ and care for historic contents, fixtures, fittings, equipment and objects which contribute to cultural heritage significance. Return or reinstate missing features or relocated items where opportunities arise. 6. Aboriginal, archaeology and natural heritage: Consider all aspects of potential heritage significance as part of assessing and minimising potential impacts, including Aboriginal, archaeology and natural heritage. 7. Unidentified heritage items: Heritage inventory sheets do not describe or capture all contributory heritage items within an identified curtilage (such as minor buildings, structures, archaeology, landscape elements, movable heritage and significant interiors and finishes). Ensure heritage advice is sought on all proposed changes within a curtilage to conserve heritage significance. 8. Recording and register update: Record changes at heritage places through adequate project records and archival photography. Notify all changes to the Section 170 Heritage & Conservation Register administrator upon project completion.

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Heritage Act - s.170 NSW State agency heritage register     

Study details

TitleYearNumberAuthorInspected byGuidelines used
State Rail Authority Heritage Register Study1999SRA68State Rail Authority  No
Heritage and Conservation Register State Rail Authority of NSW199328Paul Davies for SRA  No
S170 Heritage & Conservation Register Update2009 NSW Department of Commerce  Yes
Heritage Platforms Conservation Management Strategy2015 Australian Museum Consulting  Yes
Railway Footbridges Heritage Conservation Strategy 2016 NSW Government Architect’s Office Heritage Group  Yes

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
WrittenJohn Forsyth Line Histories
WrittenRay Love2009Historical Research for RailCorp s170 Update
WrittenSingleton, CC,1965The Short North - The Sydney-Newcastle Link Railway, New South Wales Railways
WrittenState Rail Authority of New South Wales1995How and Why of Station Names. Fourth Edition

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

rez rez rez rez rez rez
rez rez
(Click on thumbnail for full size image and image details)

Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: State Government
Database number: 4801068


Every effort has been made to ensure that information contained in the State Heritage Inventory is correct. If you find any errors or omissions please send your comments to the Database Manager.

All information and pictures on this page are the copyright of the Heritage Division or respective copyright owners.