Turramurra Railway Station Group | NSW Environment & Heritage

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Heritage

Turramurra Railway Station Group

Item details

Name of item: Turramurra Railway Station Group
Other name/s: Eastern Road
Type of item: Built
Group/Collection: Transport - Rail
Category: Railway Platform/ Station
Primary address: Rohini Street, Turrumurra, NSW 2074
Local govt. area: Ku-Ring-Gai

Boundary:

North: 5m from end of platform;South: Platform end;East: Property boundary facing Rohini Street, excluding the bus layover;West: Property boundary, including landscaping along Williams Street and Hughes Lane.(Note: Although the platform runs on a NW-SE axis, the Sydney end of the platform has notionally been described as 'south' for the above description)
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
Rohini StreetTurrumurraKu-Ring-Gai  Primary Address

Owner/s

Organisation NameOwner CategoryDate Ownership Updated
RailCorpState Government 
RailCorpState Government 
RailCorpState Government 

Statement of significance:

Turramurra Railway Station Group has significance at a local level as the construction of the railway encouraged the rapid subdivision and development of the area. The present platform building (1900) has historical significance as one of the earliest standard 'type A10' station buildings on the North Shore line. It dates from the period of construction of a railway loop at the site, whilst the majority of station buildings on this section of the North Shore date from c.1909 following the duplication of the line. Turramurra railway station has aesthetic significance as a good example of early twentieth century railway station design with fabric and details typical of this period. The landscaped setting of the railway station is also aesthetically significant with a relatively well-maintained garden setting on the western side of the platform. The station contributes to the character of the North Shore line with its homogenous, early twentieth century railway architecture and landscaped settings. The aesthetic value has been diminished by construction of a large modern concourse and footbridge as it impacts the integrity of the historic setting of the station.

The Rohini House Gates are a remnant from the former homestead in this area.
Date significance updated: 08 May 09
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Designer/Maker: New South Wales Department of Railways
Builder/Maker: New South Wales Department of Railways
Construction years: 1900-
Physical description: BUILDINGS
Station Building, type 11 (standard A10) (1900)

STRUCTURES
Platform (1900)
Footbridge & Concourse (2008)
Modern Platform Shelters (2008)

'Rohini House Gates' (1921-1940)

CONTEXT
Turramurra is located north of the Pacific Highway overbridge at Turramurra and is adjacent to the Rohini Street shopping precinct. The station is accessed from a newly constructed steel-framed pedestrian concourse which provides a pedestrian link between Rohini and William Streets. The station consists of an early twentieth century station building on an island platform; landscaping to the western (William Street) side of the station; and a modern concourse, stair, and platform awnings. The station is clearly visible from the adjacent bus interchange on Rohini Street.

STATION BUILDING (1900)
Exterior: Turramurra Station is a typical example of a Type A10 standard design station building, although somewhat less detailed than other stations on the Northern line. The building is of red face brick (no tuckpointing) with rendered architraves, sills and brackets. The string course is of two small projecting rendered bands, with the rows of brick between painted to give the impression of a deep rendered string course. The roof is gabled and of corrugated iron, with timber barge boards, finials and valances. The timber framed awnings of the building are supported on curved cast iron brackets with a cast iron circle at the intersection of the members (as opposed to the more usual double curved type compression member). The building has been abutted at either end by new platform steel and glass awnings. At the southern end of the building, the roofline extends and acts as a covered area for the ticket selling window. Most doors and windows are original. The building features a brick chimney with rendered cornice along the ridgeline.

Interior: Turramurra Station building has been extensively modified internally yet retains a number of its original fittings. Walls are rendered with decorative air vents, whilst ceilings are mini orb (no roses). Timber floors have been carpeted. All doors are modern and coloured glazing in fanlights and windows has been replaced with clear glazing. Windows are double hung sash. Rooms have been subdivided internally, with a new storage room, locker and toilet at the north end. The former men's toilet at the northern end of the building has been turned into a storage room with a new ceiling and concrete floor housing the computer mainframe. Fireplaces have been infilled or removed.

PLATFORM (1900)
Island platform. Platform faces are of rendered brick. The surface of the platform has been asphalted during renovation works at the station.

FOOTBRIDGE & CONCOURSE (2008)
A 1977 precast concrete girder footbridge has been demolished and replaced by a large concourse level accessed directly from William and Rohini Streets. The concourse is a steel framed structure with a skillion roof and rests on a concrete footing. A steel framed staircase with precast concrete steps gives access to the island platform.

MODERN PLATFORM AWNINGS (2008)
Large steel framed platform awnings abut both the north and south ends of the station building. Supported by an oversized steel beam placed slightly to the west of the centre of the platform, the roof cantilevers in both directions to the platform edge, with a box gutter running along the spine. The central section of the roof is made of glass.

LANDSCAPE
The western side of the rail corridor features a relatively well maintained garden setting of quite dense vegetation. Varieties include native and introduced specimens, including bottle brush, palm, gardenia, jacaranda, grass plant, tea tree, camellia and "fruit salad plant" (monstereo deliciosa). The southern end of this garden is more formal than the northern end, with individual trees planted amongst well maintained lawns.

MOVEABLE
Old manually operated station indicator boards remain in the northern storage room, in good working order.

ARCHAEOLOGICAL POTENTIAL
There is a possibility that some disturbed remains of the former crossing loop (1899) may exist, which was taken around the western side of the platform and station building, however this is unlikely to yield significant new information about railway line configuration from the late nineteenth century.

ROHINI HOUSE GATES
Remnant gate posts from the original house in this area. Located at the northern end of the railway carpark adjacent to Rohini Street. Single wrought iron gate between 2 stone gate posts.
Physical condition and/or
Archaeological potential:
Station Building - Good Condition
Platform Faces - Good Condition
Footbridge & Concourse - Very Good Condition
Modern Platform Shelters - Very Good Condition
Landscape - Good Condition
Moveable - Good Condition
Rohini House Gates - Good Condition
Date condition updated:23 Mar 09
Modifications and dates: 1940: Goods siding removed.
2008: Major upgrading works, including concourse, stairs and platform awnings, were carried out.
N.d: Internal modifications to station building.
Further information: Note: The Ronhini Gates are outside the border of railway land, however are included in this listing for identification purposes.
Current use: Railway Station
Former use: Nil

History

Historical notes: Turramurra Railway Station is located on the North Shore line between Warrawee and Pymble Railway Stations.

In 1887, tenders were called for construction of a branch line extending south from Hornsby to the North Shore. The 16.8km section between Hornsby and St. Leonard’s was opened on 1 January 1890. Stations provided at the opening of the line included Chatswood and St. Leonard’s. A single line was constructed at the time. The line between St. Leonard’s and Milson’s Point (the terminus at the edge of the harbour) was completed 1 May 1893.

Turramurra Railway Station was opened on 1 January 1890. At the time of the opening, Turramurra was named ‘Eastern Road’. On 30 August 1890, the station was re-named ‘Turramurra’. A single platform was built on the-then single line on the down, or western-side of the line.

In 1899, Turramurra became a crossing station, in order to divide the lengthy Gordon-Hornsby section. The crossing loop was taken around the rear (western) side of the platform and station building, creating an island platform. The present standard brick, island platform style station building replaced the original building in 1900. A footbridge was provided at the Milson’s Point end of the platform with a set of steps for access and a goods loop was laid in on the up side of the line opposite the platform.

Duplication came to this section of the North Shore line in 1909, along with slight slewing of the main lines on both ends of Turramurra station for a better alignment with the new track. The goods siding was removed in 1940.

Electrification of the North Shore line was opened in 1927, with full electric services in 1928. Automatic signalling of the North Shore line soon followed.

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Transport-Activities associated with the moving of people and goods from one place to another, and systems for the provision of such movements Building the railway network-

Assessment of significance

SHR Criteria a)
[Historical significance]
Turramurra Railway Station has historical significance at a local level. It was an original station on the North Shore line. Although there was limited settlement in the area prior to this date, the construction of the railway encouraged the rapid subdivision and development of the area. The present platform building (1900) has historical significance as it is one of the earliest examples of a standard 'type A10' railway station building on the Northern line, as the majority of station buildings on this section of the North Shore date from c.1909 following the duplication of the line.

The Rohini House Gates are a remnant of the former historical use of the site.
SHR Criteria c)
[Aesthetic significance]
Turramurra Railway Station has aesthetic significance at a local level. The station is a good example of early twentieth century railway station design with fabric and details typical of this period and is similar to other railway buildings of the late nineteenth and early twentieth century in the Sydney region, particularly Epping Railway Station. The landscaped setting of the railway station is also aesthetically significant at a local level with a relatively well-maintained garden setting on the western side of the platform. The station contributes to the character of the North Shore line with its homogenous, early twentieth century railway architecture and landscaped settings. However, the aesthetic value has been diminished by construction of a large modern concourse and footbridge as it impacts the integrity of the historic setting of the station.
SHR Criteria d)
[Social significance]
The place has the potential to contribute to the local community's sense of place and can provide a connection to the local community's history.
SHR Criteria e)
[Research potential]
The archaeological research potential of the site is considered to be low. There may be some disturbed remains of the former crossing loop (1899) which was taken around the western side of the platform and station building, creating an island platform, but this is unlikely to yield significant new information about railway line configuration from the late nineteenth century.
SHR Criteria g)
[Representativeness]
The platform building and island platform at Turramurra are representative of structures built at Sydney railway stations between 1892 and 1929, particularly the period around 1900, and is an early example of a standard 'type A10' design.
Integrity/Intactness: Turramurra Railway Station building remains relatively intact externally, although a number of modifications have been carried out internally resulting in a loss of integrity. The integrity of the station group as a whole has been diminished by the construction of a large modern concourse and footbridge as it impacts the integrity of the historic setting of the station. Other far more intact examples exist along the line.
Assessment criteria: Items are assessed against the PDF State Heritage Register (SHR) Criteria to determine the level of significance. Refer to the Listings below for the level of statutory protection.

Recommended management:

1. Conservation principles: Conserve cultural heritage significance and minimise impacts on heritage values and fabric in accordance with the ‘Australia ICOMOS Charter for Places of Cultural Significance’. 2. Specialist advice: Seek advice from a qualified heritage specialist during all phases of a proposed project from feasibility, concept and option planning stage; detailed design; heritage approval and assessment; through to construction and finalisation. 3. Documentation: Prepare a Statement of Heritage Impact (SOHI) to assess, minimise and prevent heritage impacts as part of the assessment and approval phase of a project. Prepare a Conservation Management Plan (CMP) prior to proposing major works (such as new additions, change of use or proposed demolition) at all places of State significance and all complex sites of Local significance. 4. Maintenance and repair: Undertake annual inspections and proactive routine maintenance works to conserve heritage fabric in accordance with the ‘Minimum Standards of Maintenance & Repair’. 5. Movable heritage: Retain in situ and care for historic contents, fixtures, fittings, equipment and objects which contribute to cultural heritage significance. Return or reinstate missing features or relocated items where opportunities arise. 6. Aboriginal, archaeology and natural heritage: Consider all aspects of potential heritage significance as part of assessing and minimising potential impacts, including Aboriginal, archaeology and natural heritage. 7. Unidentified heritage items: Heritage inventory sheets do not describe or capture all contributory heritage items within an identified curtilage (such as minor buildings, structures, archaeology, landscape elements, movable heritage and significant interiors and finishes). Ensure heritage advice is sought on all proposed changes within a curtilage to conserve heritage significance. 8. Recording and register update: Record changes at heritage places through adequate project records and archival photography. Notify all changes to the Section 170 Heritage & Conservation Register administrator upon project completion.

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Heritage Act - s.170 NSW State agency heritage register     

Study details

TitleYearNumberAuthorInspected byGuidelines used
State Rail Authority Heritage Register Study1999SRA70State Rail Authority  No
Heritage and Conservation Register State Rail Authority of NSW199329Paul Davies for SRA  No
S170 Heritage & Conservation Register Update2009 NSW Department of Commerce  Yes
Heritage Platforms Conservation Management Strategy2015 Australian Museum Consulting  Yes

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
WrittenJohn Forsyth Line Histories
WrittenRay Love2009Historical Research for RailCorp s170 Update
WrittenSingleton, CC1965The Short North - The Sydney-Newcastle Link Railway, New South Wales Railways
WrittenState Rail Authority of New South Wales1995How and Why of Station Names. Fourth Edition

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

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Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: State Government
Database number: 4801070


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