Strathfield Railway Station Group | NSW Environment & Heritage

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Heritage

Strathfield Railway Station Group

Item details

Name of item: Strathfield Railway Station Group
Other name/s: Redmyre Halt (1876-1886)
Type of item: Built
Group/Collection: Transport - Rail
Category: Railway Platform/ Station
Primary address: Strathfield Sq, Albert Road, Strathfield, NSW 2135
Local govt. area: Strathfield

Boundary:

North West: Approximately 75m past the end of Platform 3-4 (to the edge of Raw Sq); South East: Approximately 75m past the end of Platform 3-4; North East: Property boundary along Everton Rd; South West: Property Boundary along Albert Rd/ Starthfield Square. Note: The SHR listing boundary extends to the north-west to include the substation.
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
Strathfield Sq, Albert RoadStrathfieldStrathfield  Primary Address

Owner/s

Organisation NameOwner CategoryDate Ownership Updated
RailCorpState Government 
RailCorpState Government 
RailCorpState Government 

Statement of significance:

Strathfield Railway Station is of State significance as it is an excellent example of a large suburban station complex which presents a stylistic coherence across its structures and which date mostly from the same time period. Its unique and distinctive long, high canopies, standing on all four island platforms are supported on decorative steel arched trusses and elaborate cast iron columns, and fringed with the delicate timber valances, combine with the sweeping curve of the platforms, to create a high level of aesthetic design. The utilitarian face brick parcels office with its cantilevered canopy and terracotta gabled roof remains essentially as it was built, and extends the aesthetic pattern established for the platform buildings under the canopies. The signal box to the west on Albert Street with its Dutch gable roof is representative of this type of structure, but at Strathfield is distinctive for being a larger three level structure which demonstrates the importance of Strathfield as a major junction station.

The site of the railway station is historically significant, being one of the early stations built in 1876, on the Main Western Line, constructed to provide connection to Parramatta and the regions beyond. It became a major junction station in 1886, when the Main Northern Line was constructed and linked with the Main Western Line at Strathfield. The present station is significant for being completely rebuilt in 1927 as a full scale suburban station, catering for local as well as regional passengers, and being associated with the electrification of the suburban network in the 1920s.
Date significance updated: 14 Jul 09
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Designer/Maker: NSW Government Railways
Builder/Maker: NSW Government Railways
Physical description: BUILDINGS
Everton Rd Booking Office (1927) & Canopy to Everton Rd Elevation (1994)
Everton Rd WC Building (1944)
Everton Rd End Staff Room & Ticket Office - Subway Level (1927)
Everton Rd End Toilet Facilities - Subway Level (1927)
Platform Building - Platform 1-2: (1927)
Platform Building A - Platform 3-4: (1927)
Platform Building B - Platform 3-4: (1927)
Platform Building C - Platform 3-4: (1927)
Platform Building D - Platform 3-4: (1927)
Platform Building A - Platform 5-6: (1927)
Platform Building B - Platform 5-6: (1927)
Platform Building A - Platform 7-8: (1927)
Platform Building B - Platform 7-8: (1927)
Albert Rd Booking Office (1927 - highly altered 1980) Canopies to entrance (c.1980s)
Former Parcel Shed & Luggage Platform (1927)
Former Parcel Office/Albert Rd Travel Centre (1927 - highly altered 1990)
Signal Box: (1927)

STRUCTURES
Everton Rd Entrance Stair (1927) & Lift Enclosure (1994)
Pedestrian Subway - Central: Subway Building (1927 - much altered)
Ramps to platforms (1927 - much altered)
Platforms: Platform 1-2 (1927), Platform 3-4 (1927), Platform 5-6 (1927, later extension), Platform 7-8 (1927)
Canopies: Platform 1-2 (1927), Platform 3-4 (1927), Platform 5-6 (1927), Platform 7-8 (1927)
Pedestrian Subway at east end and light-wells over Platforms 5-6 & 7-8 (1927)

CONTEXT
Strathfield Railway Station is entered from Albert Road to the south-west via ramps from the south-east and north-west elevations connecting to the central pedestrian subway. Access from the north-east is via stairs or a lift from Everton Road down to the central pedestrian subway. The platforms are then accessed via ramps and lifts from the subway. To the north-east of the station is a shopping centre, car park and square and to the south-west is a civic square, bus station and shopping precinct.

EVERTON RD BOOKING OFFICE
External: Rectangular face brick building constructed in an English bond. There is no evidence remaining of the original gabled roof form. The external walls rise from a projecting brick plinth, now at pavement level, and is divided into three bays defined by engaged brick piers. Original window openings remain intact, with the original timber framed windows on the south elevation and to the eastern end of the north elevation, with brick arched heads. The remaining two windows have modern ticket windows installed. To the east elevation there is a new door and a new roller shutter in the original openings. The door on the western elevation is a new door in the original opening, with the later addition of a hood over.

The building and awning is surrounded by a wide fascia, the profile of which is different to that shown on the original drawings. The awning extends to the north and the east and appears to have been extended to continue all the way along to the new lift enclosure. The soffit of the canopy has a new lining, new skylight openings and modern light fittings. An intrusive modern steel awning has been installed along the Everton Road elevation, continuing over the top of the fascia awning of the original building, supported on the roadside by steel posts and on the building side, by bracket supports fixed through the timber fascia. A new brick wall enclosure containing high voltage equipment has been constructed immediately to the west of the booking office.

Internal: Original painted plaster walls with dado mould remain. There is a new plasterboard ceiling and cornice, and new architraves to the southern windows. The original slate threshold remains. There was no access to the interior of the room to the eastern end.

EVERTON RD WC BUILDING
External: Rectangular face brick building in a stretcher bond with a gable roof with timber bargeboards and associated timber mouldings. The building has typical 1940s detailing to the timber doors and windows and has a corrugated asbestos cement roof. Services and pipework have been fixed to the south elevation.

Internal: There was no access to the interior of this building.

EVERTON RD END STAFF ROOM & TICKET OFFICE - SUBWAY LEVEL
External: Face brick enclosure at subway level, constructed in English bond, with a flat roof.
The external walls rise from a projecting brick plinth three courses high with a decorative soldier course, with a profiled brick string course above, running immediately above the door and window openings. The building is capped with a timber moulded cornice which has been painted in a terracotta colour. The original window opening features a soldier course for the sill. The doors and windows all have security grilles installed. The original lantern roof light to the staff room still remains. A modern brick ‘flue’ rises at the rear of the building and terminates on the roof as a vent.
The building returns into the subway where there is a modern ticket window installation, with contemporary timber panelling under. The timber cornice returns across the opening into the subway

Internal: There was no access to the interior of this building.

EVERTON RD END TOILET FACILITIES - SUBWAY LEVEL
The toilet facilities are accessed from the subway and also from the base of the ramp to Platform 1-2 have a modern fitout. The cleaner’s store in this vicinity also has a 1970s fitout. These rooms feature modern panelled doors.

PLATFORM BUILDING (Platform 1-2)
External: Rectangular face brick building predominantly in an English bond, with a flat roof. The external walls rise from a projecting brick plinth five courses high with a decorative soldier course, with a profiled brick string course above, running immediately above the door and window openings. The building is capped with a concrete moulded cornice which has been painted. The original window openings feature a bull-nosed brick on edge sill. The original timber windows remain and are double hung sash windows, with nine panes to the upper sash and a horizontal glazing bar dividing the lower sash. The window to the west end facing Platform 2 has an air conditioning unit fixed though the upper part of the frame, which means the upper sash of the window is fixed in an ‘open’ position. The glazing is generally original. The door facing Platform 1 is a modern timber door in an original opening with a flyscreen fitted to the outside. The door facing Platform 2 appears to be a modern timber door in an opening created at a later stage; it also has a flyscreen fitted to the outside.

A modern extension (c.2008) to the western end of the building has been constructed in a stretcher bond face brick, with a simplified cornice capping the roof, the top of which sits just under the string course of the original building. This extension has an opening with a new panelled door facing Platform 2. Modern services and conduits have been fixed to the face of the building and in one instance the string course and cornice have been cut away to accommodate pipework.

Internal: Painted plaster walls with original vents and modern vinyl floor covering. Original concrete ceilings with cornices remain. The original partition wall has been removed and a new partition wall built in a different location. There are original architraves to the windows. Modern services and conduits have been fixed to the walls.

PLATFORM BUILDING A - LUGGAGE STORE (Platform 3-4)
External: Rectangular face brick building predominantly in an English bond, with flat roof. The external walls rise from a projecting brick plinth five courses high with a decorative soldier course, with a profiled brick string course above, running immediately above the door and window openings. The building is capped with a concrete moulded cornice which has been painted.

The original door openings have been modified and new steel framed doors installed. There are new panelled doors to the western end and a roller shutter to the eastern elevation. There is a bricked up opening facing Platform 3. Modern services and conduits have been fixed to the face of the building.

Internal: Painted brick walls and original ceilings with cornices remain. The building has a concrete floor.

PLATFORM BUILDING B - SM’s OFFICE (Platform 3-4)
External: Rectangular face brick building predominantly in an English bond, with flat roof. The external walls rise from a projecting brick plinth 5 courses high with a decorative soldier course, with a profiled brick string course above, running immediately above the door and window openings. The building is capped with a concrete moulded cornice which has been painted. The original window openings feature a bull-nosed brick on edge sill. Modern flyscreens have been fitted over the original windows to the western end. To the eastern end (facing both platforms) the window openings have been bricked up and smaller timber framed fixed sashes installed at a high level.

All of the doors are modern, and most have flyscreens installed. Many of the openings facing Platform 3 have been modified or bricked up. Modern services and conduits have been fixed to the face of the building. An original telephone case and bells remain fixed to the wall facing Platform 4.

Internal: Painted plaster walls (with dado and picture rail) with some original cast iron vents remain and there is a modern floor covering. Original ceilings with ovolo cornices remain. There are original architraves remaining on some of the windows. There are modern internal partition walls and fitout to the eastern end of the building. Modern services and conduits have been fixed to the walls.

PLATFORM BUILDING C - KIOSK & STORE ROOM (Platform 3-4)
External: Rectangular face brick building predominantly in an English bond, with flat roof. The external walls rise from a projecting brick plinth five courses high with a decorative soldier course, with a profiled brick string course above, running immediately above the door and window openings. The building is capped with a concrete moulded cornice which has been painted. The original window openings feature a bull-nosed brick on edge sill. Most of the original timber windows remain and are double hung sash windows, with nine panes to the upper sash and a horizontal glazing bar dividing the lower sash. To the western end is a narrower window to the same detail, but with six panes to the upper sash. Timber beaded flyscreens have been installed on the outside of most of the windows. The window to the kiosk has a timber apron fixed to the exterior at sill level. The glazing is generally original, but in some instances has been replaced with wired glass. The door facing Platform 3 to the eastern end is a modern timber door in an original opening and the doors to the kiosk, facing both platforms, are modern.

Modern services and conduits have been fixed to the face of the building and in one instance the string course and cornice have been cut away to accommodate pipework.

Internal: Painted plaster walls with original cast iron vents remain with a modern vinyl floor covering. Original ceilings with ovolo cornices remain. There are original architraves to the windows, with corbelled shelf over. Modern services and conduits have been fixed to the walls. The windows to the kiosk have security bars fitted to the inside.

PLATFORM BUILDING D - STAFF MEAL ROOM (Platform 3-4)
External: Rectangular face brick building predominantly in an English bond, with flat roof. The external walls rise from a projecting brick plinth five courses high with a decorative soldier course running immediately above the door and window openings. The building is capped with a brick on edge course. The window openings feature a bull-nosed brick on edge sill. The original timber windows to the western end remain and are double hung sash windows to the same detail as on Platform 1-2. In addition, the windows are fitted with security bars. The western elevation has glazing to the upper sash only, with the lower sash boarded up. The windows facing the platforms to the eastern end are high level sliding sash timber windows; each sash is divided into six panes.

The door facing Platform 3 is an original timber door in with a glazed fanlight over. There is an original hand painted sign visible on the door (although it has been painted over). Modern signage and conduits have been fixed to the face of the building.

Internal: Painted plaster walls with fibre cement sheets to the ceiling and a modern vinyl floor covering. There are original architraves to the windows to the eastern end. Modern services and conduits have been fixed to the walls, although the original switch remains beside the entrance door. The building has a modern fitout.

PLATFORM BUILDING A - CONTROL ROOM & TOILETS (Platform 5-6)
External: Rectangular face brick building predominantly in an English bond, with flat roof. The external walls rise from a projecting brick plinth 5 courses high with a decorative soldier course, with a profiled brick string course above, running immediately above the door and window openings. The building is capped with a timber cornice which has been painted. The original window openings feature a bull-nosed brick on edge sill. All of the doors are modern, a new timber window, to modern detail, has been installed to the ladies toilets and there is a new metal window at high level facing Platform 6. Modern services and conduits have been fixed to the face of the building.

Internal: Painted plaster walls (with dado and picture rail) and modern floor covering. Original fibrous plaster ceilings with cornices remain. There are original architraves remaining on most of the windows. Modern services and conduits have been fixed to the walls. There are original internal partition walls to the toilets.

PLATFORM BUILDING B - KIOSK & STORE ROOM (Platform 5-6)
External: Rectangular face brick building predominantly in an English bond, with flat roof. The external walls rise from a projecting brick plinth five courses high with a decorative soldier course, with a profiled brick string course above, running immediately above the door and window openings. The building is capped with a timber cornice which has been painted. The original window openings feature a bull-nosed brick on edge sill. Most of the original timber windows remain and are double hung sash windows, with nine panes to the upper sash and a horizontal glazing bar dividing the lower sash. To the eastern end is a narrower window to the same detail, but with six panes to the upper sash. Timber beaded flyscreens have been installed on the outside of most of the windows. The window to the kiosk has a timber apron fixed to the exterior at sill level. The doors are modern timber doors in original openings and the doors to the kiosk, facing both platforms, are modern. Modern services and conduits have been fixed to the face of the building.

Internal: (No access to interior) Painted plaster walls with original cast iron vents and modern vinyl floor covering. Original ceilings with ovolo cornices remain. There are original architraves to the windows. The windows to the kiosk have security bars fitted to the inside.

PLATFORM BUILDING A - CONTROL ROOM & STORE (Platform 7-8)
External: Rectangular face brick building predominantly in an English bond, with flat roof. The external walls rise from a projecting brick plinth five courses high with a decorative soldier course, with a profiled brick string course above, running immediately above the door and window openings. The building is capped with a timber cornice which has been painted. The original window openings feature a bull-nosed brick on edge sill. Openings have been significantly modified or bricked up. A new metal window has been installed at the eastern end facing Platform 7. All of the doors are modern with external security grilles installed. Modern services and conduits have been fixed to the face of the building.

Internal: In the control room original ceilings with cornices remain, though there are new architraves to windows and doors and there is a vinyl floor covering. Modern services and conduits have been fixed to the walls. The store room has a new ceiling and cornice and has a tiled finish to the floor.

PLATFORM BUILDING B - SS OFFICER & STORE ROOM (Platform 7-8)
External: Rectangular face brick building predominantly in an English bond, with flat roof. The external walls rise from a projecting brick plinth five courses high with a decorative soldier course, with a profiled brick string course above, running immediately above the door and window openings. The building is capped with a timber cornice which has been painted. The original window openings feature a bull-nosed brick on edge sill. The doors are modern timber doors in original openings with external security grilles installed. Modern services and conduits have been fixed to the face of the building.

Internal: The SS Officer’s room has original ceilings with cornices and original architraves to windows are intact. There are new doors in the original opening and an AC unit has been installed through the fanlight. Modern services and conduits have been fixed to the walls. The store room has the original ceiling and cornice but no architraves.

ALBERT RD BOOKING OFFICE & STATION ENTRANCE
External: The Albert Road elevation was originally a raised pedestrian footpath with windows below allowing light into the booking office which faces into the subway. The building underwent substantial modifications in the 1980s which added a first floor to the original building and drastically altered the street appearance by removing the original footpath and railings, removing the low level windows and applying render to the existing face brickwork. The 1st floor addition is of face brick (stretcher bond) with engaged pilasters, extending from those on the original building, and with a parapet containing a flat roof beyond. The timber framed windows are centrally located within the bays of pilasters and have semicircular brick on edge arched heads, and soldier course sills. An AC unit has been fixed through one of the central openings. There is also a window to the west elevation and a door to the east.

The existing ramps on the east and west sides of the building have been replaced with garden beds and steps with typical arched steel railings on the eastern side. The brick wall to the platform remains intact (although it has been rendered to the same height as the ground floor section) and the original light standards remain. The rear of the parapet and the flat roof is visible from the platform.

The exterior of the northern elevation (to the subway) remains relatively intact, with exposed brickwork and a cement band with a moulded cornice above the door and window openings. The ticket windows have been replaced within the original openings and some modifications to the openings to the eastern end is apparent from the original plans. The original drawings also show glazed panels between the ticket windows, no evidence of these remains. The entrance to the station has been completely reinvented in the 1980s with an arched steel canopy, with corrugated steel roofing over, to both the eastern and western entrances .The shops and cafes along the Albert Road elevation are also a modern addition.

Internal: The booking office has been much altered for operational needs, and the first floor addition with new internal staircase means little original fabric is evident. The ceiling to first floor is the underside of the Bondek supporting the concrete slab. Services and conduits have been fixed to the walls.

There is no significant original fabric still remaining in the adjacent rooms, which have been altered over time to suit a range of different accommodation.

The ramp from the street to the subway has been tiled with white ceramic tiles to mid height, and has a new tiled and paved floor finish. The roof over has been replaced with a translucent corrugated sheeting (where the original drawings show a glazed roof structure).

FORMER PARCEL SHED & LUGGAGE PLATFORM
External: A small rectangular brick building, built in the style of a Type 11 station building, with a gabled roof and integral shallower sloped awning. The roof of the building is the original Marseille tiles with terracotta ridging. The awning is clad in corrugated steel. The exterior walls rise from a projecting brick plinth, five courses above the surface of the platform. The building has two engaged brick pilasters to the north elevation with moulded cement corbels supporting standard double bowed steel brackets.

The soffit lining of the awning is the underside of the corrugated steel fixed to intermediate exposed purlins and follows the roof slope. Vertical timber boards form a valance at each end of the awning with a timber fascia to the northern edge. The awning extends beyond the building to both the east and the west, where it is supported by steel stanchions set into a concrete footing. New gutters are connected to new downpipes that run under the awning and are fixed to the front of the building. There are no window openings and the original timber ledged and braced sliding door still remains. The timber platform is currently accessed from the eastern end where an original timber post remains. There is a modern timber rail to the tracks and timber trellis below the platform level.

To the west of the building are brick enclosures on a concrete slab, with a concrete slab for the roof, which are indicated on original drawings to be dog kennels. The original doors to the kennels have been replaced with metal doors. No timber picket fence remains in front of the kennel enclosure. The area surrounding the building are neglected and overgrown.

Internal: There was no access to the interior of this building.

FORMER PARCEL OFFICE/ALBERT RD TRAVEL CENTRE
External: Completely refurbished in the early 1990s the building bears little resemblance to the original parcel office. The original face brick walls have been rendered over, with horizontal channels laid into the render, and openings have been significantly altered, including original windows bricked up and new larger openings created to accommodate new aluminium framed windows. The building retains the original rectangular floor plan with gabled roof, although the refurbishments saw the eaves overhang cut back with new guttering and new custom orb roof sheeting. The original gable facing Albert Road has been removed. The drawings indicate that the inner skin of the exterior walls has been rebuilt with new wall linings and a new ceiling, but retaining some original roof structure. The existing external face brick wall to the north elevation still remains and is visible from the platform. There is one original window remaining in the north-east corner of the building.

Internal: The interior has a completely modern fit out, with new partition walls and no original fabric remains.

SIGNAL BOX
Strathfield power signal box is located at the west end of Strathfield station’s number 7 & 8 platforms on the left (Down) side of the line.

External: The building is a three level power signal box, comprising the operating floor, relay room and the garage annex. The first two levels are constructed in face brick and the garage annex to street level was added later and extends out from the main brick structure. The building at street level has three openings with roller shutter doors and access doors to the south elevation and also has windows on the east and west elevations. These windows have brick on edge sills and painted concrete lintels. Modern security grilles have been fitted to all the windows on the ground floor. The second level (relay room, transformer room, vestibule and a toilet) is divided externally into four bays to the north and south elevations and two bays to the east and west. The bays are defined by engaged brick piers with chamfered cappings which rise about seven courses above the window openings. There is a door on the east and west elevations (with access via a modern steel stair on the western side). This level has timber framed windows (predominantly casement windows) with a top hung window above. The windows have brick on edge sills and painted concrete lintels.

The top level of the signal box is a timber framed structure to first floor with fibre cement cladding sitting on precast concrete slab. Facing the station, to the north, the front two corners of the building are chamfered. There are timber framed multi paned sliding casement windows in the west, north, east and chamfered walls with no openings in the south (rear) wall. There is a balcony with steel tubular balustrade to north, east & west. The building has a Dutch gable roof with asbestos cement slates with terracotta ridge capping and wide overhanging eaves.

Internal: The ground floor, at street level, houses three garages and an adjacent room (currently used as an office) which have painted brick walls and a flat reinforced concrete roof. There is a vinyl floor covering to the office, the garages have concrete floors. The middle level comprises of four rooms, the relay room, transformer room, vestibule and a toilet. The walls are painted brick with concrete to the floor and ceilings. There is a timber section over which the signalling equipment would have been located. There is some heavy steel framing propping the ceiling at this level. The top floor has a typical ceiling detail with raked section to perimeter and cover mouldings. Metal bracing across the ceiling is also typical in signal boxes of this period. Interior walls have fibre cement sheet and batten cladding. A toilet is located under the western eave. All three levels are interconnected with two iron spiral staircases. There are services and conduits attached to the brick walls and to the ceilings. There are original switch fittings and the original power board remains. None of the former signalling equipment remains.

EVERTON RD ENTRANCE STAIR & LIFT ENCLOSURE
External: Face brick enclosure at street level, constructed in English bond, with a gable roof clad in corrugated steel and clerestory windows to the stairs below. Some of the glazing to these timber framed windows has been replaced with wire mesh glass. A modern brick lift enclosure and associated motor room has been constructed on the street elevation. This extension has a cantilevered awning which extends out over the footpath. The top of the brick lift shaft continues past the ridge of the gable roof to the covered stairway. Repairs to the brickwork on the eastern elevation have been undertaken.

Internal: The walls to the stair are clad to pavement level (higher at the entrance to the stairs) with white ceramic tiles. The stairs have the same tiled finish as the subway. New handrails have been installed to the sides and centre of the stair.

PEDESTRIAN SUBWAY - CENTRAL
The subway has been completely refurbished with modern finishes. The walls are lined with white ceramic tiling and the floor is also tiled. The ceiling has a modern lining. There are lift enclosures along the length of the subway, servicing the platforms, and a bank of monitors displaying timetable and train information. The rooms accessed off the subway such as the cleaner’s store between Platforms 2 and 3 have the original concrete floor and walls exposed. There is historic fabric at either end of the subway, at the lower ground level, which is addressed elsewhere.

RAMPS TO PLATFORMS
Walls to ramps are tiled with white ceramic tiles up to the platform level with the brick walls exposed above. The ramps have a rubber ground surface and modern handrails and signage.

PLATFORMS
The platforms are all island platforms and are concrete faced with an asphalt surface. Tactile indicators have been installed along the platform edges and to the top of the ramps. There is considerable yellow painted signage on the asphalt surface. Open voids allow light into the subway below. These voids are contained by brick walls, constructed in English bond, which have metal railings fixed along the top. These brick walls also enclose the ramps from the subway to the platforms. Some of these brick walls have been rebuilt and modified as necessary adjacent to lift enclosures, and to provide access to the lift motor rooms via steel stairs. New pedestrian bridges, over existing voids, were constructed on Platform 1-2 & 7-8 to create a landing for the lift at platform level.

The platforms still feature original 1920s light fittings and some original signage on Platform 3-4, albeit with an inappropriate railing under. Modern signage is prominent along all the platforms. Typical arched steel railings have been installed at the ends of the platforms to prevent access to the tracks. Platform 1-2 was extended by 25m in 1944 and Platform 5-6 was extended more recently.

CANOPIES
The canopies to all of the platforms are constructed with large steel truss framing supported by circular cast iron columns, with decorative bases and capitals (many replaced soon after construction with columns made up of steel sections to support overhead electric equipment). The roof is timber framed gable structure with an original boarded fascia made up of individual profile boards. The roof is clad with corrugated steel sheeting, supported on purlins, which is exposed to the underside. Rainwater goods have been incorporated into the detailing of the columns.

Modern signage, such as directional signs and the ‘Kiosk’ signs on Platforms 5-6 and 7-8 and train information screens have been fixed directly to frame. CCTV and modern lighting and other services also have been fixed to the original fabric.

PEDESTRIAN SUBWAY - EAST (& LIGHT-WELLS OVER)
The subway connects Everton Road to the north (via a ramp down from street level) to Albert Road/Strathfield Square to the south. The ramp down to the subway has the original brick walls (painted) with a modern concrete surface and handrail. There are modern light fittings with exposed conduit fitted along the north wall. The floor finish at the bottom of the ramp and to the subway is tiled. The walls of the subway have been lined with panels which are covered in murals/graffiti. The subway ceiling has been lined and is equipped with modern light fittings so that the light-wells over no longer serve any purpose.

The light-wells over the subway at the end of Platforms 5-6 and 7-8 are rectangular structures with gabled roofs clad in corrugated steel. They are constructed with a brick plinth (six courses) on a brick base with clerestory windows on a concrete sill (to the same detail as the covered entrance on Everton Road). The extension to Platform 5-6 has incorporated the structure so the brick base is no longer visible. The original timber window frames and the detailing to the gable ends remains. The windows have been reglazed, in some instances, with a variety of different materials including reinforced fibreglass, wire mesh glass or are left open with a security mesh protecting the opening.

MOVEABLE ITEMS
Memorial Plaque fixed to Platform Building B on Platform 3-4.
Plaque to Albert Rd Booking Office referring to previous buildings on the site including former 1870s residence 'Silwood' which was demolished in 1925 to accommodate extension of station.

ARCHAEOLOGICAL POTENTIAL
Based on the surviving documentation and the evidence on site it is unlikely there would be any potential archaeological remains at Strathfield.

MOVABLE
Green cast iron safe – NSW RV Safe – in staff rooms on platform
Early green cast iron safe in concourse office
Framed and laminated prints in staff rooms on platform
Sydney 2000 Olympic Games Certificate of Appreciation
8 x 1980s Strathfield platform signs in storage
Timber shelving in parcels office
Large collection of timber rollover indicator boards in storage and on display in SM office
Wall-mounted memorial clock and plaque on Platform 3
Suspended kiosk sign
Early bells fixed to platform awnings
Early telephones fixed to platforms
Early station signage
Physical condition and/or
Archaeological potential:
EVERTON RD BOOKING OFFICE
The booking office is in good condition.

EVERTON RD WC BUILDING
The building is in moderate condition.

EVERTON RD END STAFF ROOM & TICKET OFFICE - SUBWAY LEVEL
These elements are generally in good condition, though may be some issues with damp.

EVERTON RD END TOILET FACILITIES - SUBWAY LEVEL
These rooms have been recently refurbished and are in very good condition.

PLATFORM BUILDINGS
All the platform buildings are generally in good condition.

ALBERT RD BOOKING OFFICE & STATION ENTRANCE
The booking office is generally in good condition. The canopies to the station entrance are in good condition.

FORMER PARCEL SHED & LUGGAGE PLATFORM
This building is in moderate condition.

FORMER PARCEL OFFICE/ALBERT RD TRAVEL CENTRE
This building is in good condition.

SIGNAL BOX
The signal box is in moderate condition.

EVERTON RD ENTRANCE STAIR & LIFT ENCLOSURE
These elements are generally in good condition.

PEDESTRIAN SUBWAY - CENTRAL
The subway has been recently refurbished and is in very good condition.

RAMPS TO PLATFORMS
The ramps have been recently refurbished and are in very good condition.

PLATFORMS
The platforms are generally in good condition.

CANOPIES
All the canopies are generally in good condition.

PEDESTRIAN SUBWAY - EAST (& LIGHT-WELLS OVER)
The subway is generally in good condition.
Date condition updated:09 Jul 09
Modifications and dates: c.1927: (Signal Box) Addition of a toilet under the western eaves of the operating level during construction or soon after opening. Two motorcar garages (Nos 2 and 3) have been added in the garage annex since the issuing of the original construction plans.
1928: Local and Suburban lines electrified to Homebush.
1944: Toilet provided in Up side booking office; Platform 1/2 extended by 25 m at Down end.
1945-1947: Asphalting of platforms.
1953: office provided on Platform 1/2 for traffic inspector.
1955: Main lines electrified.
1957: Kiosks in subway modernised.
c.1982 Since the closing of the signal box in 1982 and the removal of the miniature lever frame in the operating level and the wiring, relay racks and signalling relays in the relay room timber framed walls have been added to create individual rooms, workshops and storage areas in both areas.
1990s: upgrading works including passenger lifts to platforms and new passenger information system in subway.
2010: Non-original toilets refurbished
Further information: Note: also see Strathfield Railway Triangle and Flyover listing.
Current use: Railway Station
Former use: Nil

History

Historical notes: The Main Western line to Parramatta Junction (Granville) was originally completed in 1855. The line opened on 26 September 1855 and was double tracked from Sydney to Newtown and then a single track to Parramatta Junction (but duplicated in 1856). The line was built as a direct connection to Parramatta Junction and, subsequently, for the purpose of connecting Sydney with the major rural railways that were constructed across the Blue Mountains to Bathurst and across the Southern Highlands to Goulburn via Liverpool. There were few stops along the line between Sydney and Parramatta Junction and it was not the original intention of the line to serve suburban development. Changes to the line were more often related to the line’s long distance purpose than to the communities along it.

Traffic to the west and south (and later north) of the state brought the need to amplify the line, first in 1891 when it was quadrupled and later in 1927 when it was sextupled (to Homebush) and electrified. With both of these major changes the earlier stations were usually entirely demolished and replaced with a new station. The 1927 work completed this process with the complete replacement of Strathfield and much of Newtown Stations. During this time suburban development also extended west along the line and these new stations were thus specifically designed as full-scale suburban passenger stations rather than rural ‘halts’. The Engineer for Existing Lines, George Cowdery (appointed 1863), was a particularly strong influence on the architecture of this line, building particularly elegant stations in the late 1880s ahead of the 1891 quadruplication, in addition to replacing the original stone arch viaduct at Lewisham with iron truss bridges. Sextuplication in 1927 brought less change to most local stations (which were on the southern side), the new tracks being express ones on the northern side.

The first station at Strathfield opened as Redmyre Halt on 9 July 1876 and was renamed Strathfield on 8 March 1886, the suburb it served rapidly becoming a location for the large homes of wealthy professionals and businessmen. Strathfield also became significant as a railway site with the construction of the Main Northern line, which had its junction with the Western line at Strathfield. The first section to Hornsby opened on 17 September 1886 and Strathfield Station was expanded to an island and two side platforms. The Main Western line was quadruplicated between 1891 and 1892, causing track alterations and requiring the construction of a pedestrian subway at the western end of the station to connect all platforms. The station was later relocated on a site closer to Burwood, opening there on 23 September 1900. Four platforms were provided, as well as an overbridge.

In 1927, with sextuplication of the tracks, the 1900 platforms, overhead station building and road bridge were demolished and the present station was built with four platforms and a new subway about 24 m to the west of the old. Access to the new platforms was now via a centrally located pedestrian subway and ramps. A short parcels platform was also built on the down side of the Down Local Line at the Sydney end. The land required for the extra platforms was reclaimed from The Boulevard and Clarendon Street (Albert Road). It is presumed that at the same time the flyovers to the Main Northern Line and the Raw Square underbridge were built or upgraded.

As part of reconstruction of the station area and for the future electrification of the Western and Northern rail lines a new power signal box was built at Strathfield in 1927. This was located on the Down side parallel to the Down Local at the country end of the station. It was built on a resumed, triangular block of land bounded by the Main Western Line to its north and Clarendon Street (Albert Road) to its south. The power signal box was the 3rd signal box erected at Strathfield, the previous two signal boxes becoming 'mechanical signal boxes'. Strathfield power signal box controlled all train movements from the Sydney side of Wentworth Road overbridge (east), through Strathfield platforms and the tracks to the north and west of the flyover at the country end.

In 1982, as part of the upgrading and modernising of the suburban signalling system the Strathfield power signal box was closed and replaced by the new Strathfield signal box complex located at Homebush incorporating a Relay Based Route Locking Signalling System. The new complex also replaced signal boxes at Ashfield, North Strathfield, Concord West, Homebush, Flemington Car Sidings, Flemington Goods Junction and Lidcombe.

The Strathfield substation, built for electrification, was commissioned on 27 August 1928 and was one of the 15 electrical substations built in the Sydney area between 1926 and 1932. The substation was later replaced by a new installation to the north of the original building. The substation was converted to a fabrication workshop for signalling equipment, and has been used since 1990 by the Signal Branch to house its workshop. When this occurred, a modern extension was added to its south wing, removing the area on that side where the outdoor transformers were formerly located. At this time, the building was modified internally also, with offices added at the mezzanine level, a new crane installed on the original crane tracks and floor areas altered.

Strathfield continues to be a busy and important junction station with the signalling complex at Homebush being the second largest signal box in the Sydney Metropolitan area.

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Communication-Activities relating to the creation and conveyance of information Signalling and safe working-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Impacts of railways on urban form-

Assessment of significance

SHR Criteria a)
[Historical significance]
Strathfield Railway Station is of historical significance as it was the site of one of the early stations built in 1876 on the Main Western Line which was constructed to provide a direct connection from Sydney to Parramatta and beyond. It also significant for its importance as a major junction station created when the Main Northern Line was constructed and joined the Main Western Line at Strathfield in 1886.

The present station complex is significant for it being completely rebuilt in 1927 as a full scale suburban station, catering for local as well as regional traffic, rather than just a rural stop. This reconstruction, complete with a subway and access ramps to the platforms is also associated with the electrification of the Sydney Rail network which began in 1924.
SHR Criteria c)
[Aesthetic significance]
Strathfield Railway Station is of significance as it is a large junction railway station complex and, although having had some alterations and additions, retains a stylistic coherence across its buildings dating essentially from 1927. The long platform canopies especially exhibit a high level of aesthetic design consisting of soaring corrugated steel clad roofs on large arched steel trusses supported on circular cast iron columns with decorative plinths and classical influenced capitals and delicately carved timber valances forming a continuous fringe to the outer edges of the platforms. The platform buildings, which sit as separate structures beneath the canopies, are simple but elegant rectangular brick buildings crowned by a simplified classical cornice. These elements combined with the sweeping curve of the platforms give this station a high level of aesthetic significance. The Albert Road parcels office, like the platform buildings, is a simple, rectangular brick building which has a gable roof as it is not located underneath the platform shelters. The simple, utilitarian and elegant design of all the station buildings indicates that an aesthetic pattern has been consistently used throughout the station.

The extant signal box which dates from 1927 has local aesthetic significance as it has characteristic features of this type of railway signal box design namely its brickwork base, timber framed, fibre cement clad operating level and Dutch gable roof. The signal box is distinctive as compared to other extant examples of its type as it is a larger structure with three levels as opposed to the two level structures at other locations. This demonstrates the importance of Strathfield Station as a major junction in the Metropolitan network. Its technical significance however has been compromised as the signal box is largely in-operational and has been refurbished internally and all original signalling equipment has been removed.
SHR Criteria d)
[Social significance]
The place has the potential to contribute to the local community's sense of place and can provide a connection to the local community's history.
SHR Criteria e)
[Research potential]
It is also highly unlikely there would be any significant archaeological remains which would have research potential.
SHR Criteria f)
[Rarity]
Strathfield Railway Station has aesthetic rarity as the design of such a large scale site is unique for as it comprises of long, high-canopied platform shelters and no platform buildings.
Integrity/Intactness: The overall integrity of Strathfield Railway Station is considered to be high. The station has a number of original structures in a relatively intact condition including the platform buildings and canopies and the former parcel office and luggage platform. Unfortunately however, major changes at both of the station entrances and the introduction of intrusive elements and unsympathetic alterations to the original buildings, such as the Albert Road booking office and parcel office, significantly reduce the intactness and therefore the integrity of the station as a whole.EVERTON RD BOOKING OFFICEThe building has a moderate level of integrity. It retains its original form, however the installation of the modern ticket windows and roller shutter, modern signage and particularly the adjacent awning structures and the new soffit lining to the canopy detract significantly from the expression of the original building, and therefore compromise the integrity of this building.EVERTON RD WC BUILDINGThis is a 1940s building and is externally mostly intact externally.EVERTON RD END STAFF ROOM & TICKET OFFICE - SUBWAY LEVEL The building has a moderate level of integrity. A good degree of original fabric remains, including the brick work and timber cornice and the lantern light to the roof. Intrusive elements, such as the security grilles, ticket window and modern signage detract from the integrity of this building. EVERTON RD END TOILET FACILITIES - SUBWAY LEVEL The toilets have been completely refurbished with a modern fitout. PLATFORM BUILDINGSDespite modifications and operational changes the overall integrity of the platform buildings remains. The brickwork, external detailing and original timber windows are mostly intact and the building forms reads much as they would have originally. The platform buildings retain a high level of integrity.ALBERT RD BOOKING OFFICE & STATION ENTRANCEThe external appearance of booking office on Albert Road is much altered from the original with a substantial addition to the first floor and the introduction of the arched steel entrance canopies.These alterations and additions have significantly reduced the integrity of this building.FORMER PARCEL SHED & LUGGAGE PLATFORMThis building is externally mostly intact externally. The building retains a high level of integrity due to the degree of existing original fabric and the unique nature of the building. FORMER PARCEL OFFICE/ALBERT RD TRAVEL CENTREThis building has been recently refurbished and retains none of the integrity of the original building in its present form.SIGNAL BOXThe signal box fabric is largely intact externally, and has a good degree of original fabric, including the brickwork, the fibre cement cladding, timber windows, and the fibre cement slate roof. The original form of the building is lost to the street elevation, by the addition of the garage annex, but the elevation to the north (which is visible from the platforms) remains in its original state. None of the original signalling equipment remains.EVERTON RD ENTRANCE STAIR & LIFT ENCLOSUREThe entrance stair has been refurbished recently but a good degree of original fabric remains, including the brick walls (where they have not been tiled) and clerestory windows. The floor finish and ceiling are modern. The lift enclosure is completely modern.PEDESTRIAN SUBWAY - CENTRALThe subway has been completely refurbished with a modern fitout. RAMPS TO PLATFORMS The ramps have been recently refurbished although the original brick wall at platform level remains. PLATFORMS The platforms are original and representative of their historic form.CANOPIESThe canopies are original, with very early modifications. They retain a high level of integrity. PEDESTRIAN SUBWAY - EAST (& LIGHT-WELLS OVER)The subway has been recently refurbished and retains little integrity. The light-wells over are unique and retain their original form and fabric.
Assessment criteria: Items are assessed against the PDF State Heritage Register (SHR) Criteria to determine the level of significance. Refer to the Listings below for the level of statutory protection.

Recommended management:

1. Conservation principles: Conserve cultural heritage significance and minimise impacts on heritage values and fabric in accordance with the ‘Australia ICOMOS Charter for Places of Cultural Significance’. 2. Specialist advice: Seek advice from a qualified heritage specialist during all phases of a proposed project from feasibility, concept and option planning stage; detailed design; heritage approval and assessment; through to construction and finalisation. 3. Documentation: Prepare a Statement of Heritage Impact (SOHI) to assess, minimise and prevent heritage impacts as part of the assessment and approval phase of a project. Prepare a Conservation Management Plan (CMP) prior to proposing major works (such as new additions, change of use or proposed demolition) at all places of State significance and all complex sites of Local significance. 4. Maintenance and repair: Undertake annual inspections and proactive routine maintenance works to conserve heritage fabric in accordance with the ‘Minimum Standards of Maintenance & Repair’. 5. Movable heritage: Retain in situ and care for historic contents, fixtures, fittings, equipment and objects which contribute to cultural heritage significance. Return or reinstate missing features or relocated items where opportunities arise. 6. Aboriginal, archaeology and natural heritage: Consider all aspects of potential heritage significance as part of assessing and minimising potential impacts, including Aboriginal, archaeology and natural heritage. 7. Unidentified heritage items: Heritage inventory sheets do not describe or capture all contributory heritage items within an identified curtilage (such as minor buildings, structures, archaeology, landscape elements, movable heritage and significant interiors and finishes). Ensure heritage advice is sought on all proposed changes within a curtilage to conserve heritage significance. 8. Recording and register update: Record changes at heritage places through adequate project records and archival photography. Notify all changes to the Section 170 Heritage & Conservation Register administrator upon project completion.

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Heritage Act - s.170 NSW State agency heritage registerSRA s.170 Register    
Heritage studyStrathfield Railway Station    

Study details

TitleYearNumberAuthorInspected byGuidelines used
State Rail Authority Heritage Register Study1999SRA98State Rail Authority  No
Heritage and Conservation Register State Rail Authority of NSW1993302Paul Davies for SRA  No
S170 Heritage & Conservation Register Update2009 OCP Architects  Yes
Heritage Platforms Conservation Management Strategy2015 Australian Museum Consulting  Yes

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
WrittenAustralian Railway Historical Society now State Rail Authority of NSW The ‘Bulletin’, various editions Various editions
WrittenB Cubed Sustainability Pty Ltd2005Former Strathfield Substation: heritage impact statement
WrittenJohn Forsyth2007New South Wales Railway Stations: an alphabetical arrangement of railway station and place names
WrittenMoonie J2001Heritage Survey of Strathfield Power Signal Box
MapNSW Government Railways now State Rail Authority of NSW Under ‘Strathfield’
WrittenRobert Lee1988The Greatest Public Work: the New South Wales railways 1848 to 1889
WrittenTony Prescott2009Historical Research for RailCorp's S170 Update Project

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

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Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: State Government
Database number: 4801098


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