Kiama Railway Station Group and Turntable | NSW Environment & Heritage

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Heritage

Kiama Railway Station Group and Turntable

Item details

Name of item: Kiama Railway Station Group and Turntable
Type of item: Built
Group/Collection: Transport - Rail
Category: Railway Platform/ Station
Primary address: Railway Parade, Kiama, NSW 2533
Local govt. area: Kiama

Boundary:

North: 5m north of the platform end;East: boundary of RailCorp property till just south of the Bong Bong Street overbridge, then a line parallelling the platform to 5m past the platform, crossing to the west of and paralleling the railway tracks to 2m south of the turntable;South: 2m south of the turntable; West: boundary of RailCorp property west of the turntable, fronting Eddy Street, then veering east and paralleling Eddy Street and Railway Parade to exclude the car park.Note: the modern Bong Bong St concrete overbridge is excluded from the listing.
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
Railway ParadeKiamaKiama  Primary Address
Eddy StreetKiamaKiama  Alternate Address
Bong Bong StreetKiamaKiama  Alternate Address

Owner/s

Organisation NameOwner CategoryDate Ownership Updated
RailCorpState Government 
RailCorpState Government 
RailCorpState Government 

Statement of significance:

Kiama Railway Station group - including the platform, platform building, turntable and ash pits - are of State heritage significance. Kiama Railway Station is of historical significance as the first railway station on this section of the Illawarra line completed in 1893 from Bombo to Bomaderry, and for its role as a transport hub for the town of Kiama since 1893. The turntable and ash pits are remnant structures from a once substantial yard layout which served the dairying and pastoral industries. The Kiama Railway Station 1893 platform building is of aesthetic significance as the first example of an island platform building that became the model for the standard plans for this building type, known as A8-A10, issued by the NSW Railways in 1899. The building has particularly fine detailing to platform facades and awnings. The Kiama turntable is rare (one of only 3 turntables now extant on the Illawarra line - Bomaderry, Waterfall and Kiama) and of technical significance.
Date significance updated: 17 Feb 10
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Designer/Maker: NSW Government Railway.
Builder/Maker: W. Monie & J. Angus, Pritchard (rail line), C. Coghill (building)
Construction years: 1892-1893
Physical description: PRECINCT ELEMENTS
Platform building (1893) (Type 11)
Island Platform (1893)
Turntable (1897): 60` Sellers and ash pits x 2 (c. 1925)
Footbridge (2005)
Bong Bong Street overbridge (c. 1990)

PLATFORM BUILDING (1893)
Exterior: This is a single storey painted brick building (painted in heritage colours: brick colour for walls; drab for stucco reveals to windows and doors; manilla for window frames and doors) with a gabled corrugated steel roof with timber tongue & grooved boarding to gable ends. The building has timber framed double hung windows with 9 paned top sashes with coloured glass panes to top sashes and frosted glass to bottom sashes. The majority of doors are timber panelled, and there are some timber panelled double doors, all with multipaned fanlights (some fanlights covered over). Door and window openings have elaborate sandstone reveals and triangular pediments. The awnings on both sides of the building have corrugated steel skillion roofs and elaborate decorative steel awning brackets, mounted on sandstone wall brackets.

There is a small weatherboard addition to the south end of the main platform building which has 4 early stop chamfered timber posts at each corner, indicating that this is a weatherboard infill structure within an originally open awning structure. There are modern security screens to windows, and some modern timber flush doors. There is a brick screen wall to the north end of building to screen the entry to men’s toilets.

Interior: The waiting area has modern floor tiling, and modern ticket windows, timber panelled double doors both sides with frosted glass 8 paned fanlights, a later ceiling with timber battens, and later timber veneer panelling to around 2m height internally to the waiting room. Offices also have later ceilings and later timber veneer panelling to around 2m height (indicating possible presence of rising damp).

PLATFORM (1893, extended 1925)
The island has rare, early concrete retaining walls (1893, unreinforced, cast in situ, vertical profile), remains of lever bay on Platform 1, and a modern asphalt surface. The original platforms have been raised in height, also in concrete. The island is extended to north with an open steel rail frame section with a concrete deck, and to the south with precast concrete units.

TURNTABLE (1897) AND ASH PITS
(Turntable extant but not inspected 2009). A 60 foot turntable located southeast of the southern end of Eddy Street. The turntable is a sunken circular brick edged structure with a single rail on timber sleepers running around the inside, and a cast iron turntable machine in the centre of the circle marked "William Sellers & Co. Philadelphia No. 1327". The brick edging of the turntable has a soldier course capping, but is otherwise in stretcher bond.

(Ash pits - not confirmed extant. Described in earlier study and on historic plans). The 2 rectangular ash pits are reportedly located to the north of the turntable, one of which was formerly within the engine shed (engine shed no longer extant).

FOOTBRIDGE (2005)
A modern concrete, steel and glass structure with lift and stairs to platform, also modern canopy connecting platform building to the footbridge.

BONG BONG STREET OVERBRIDGE (c. 1990)
A modern concrete road overbridge with concrete piers, located south of the footbridge. Excluded from listing.

MOVABLE
Plaque - 100 years of rail transport between Kiama and Bomaderry, presented 30 May 1993
Plaque - Commemorating the arrival of the first electric train from Dapto to Kiama, 17 November 2001
Sign - "Kiama Taxi" - early/old.
Large round platform number signs fitted to cast iron verandah brackets
"Kiama" and "1893" wall-mounted station signs
In former signal box - two single timber rollover indicator boards with clock faces and one foot pedal, set of early cast iron signal levers, two-door timber cupboard.
In staff room, an electric staff instrument, staff contact box, wall-mounted lock box, several SRA SL brass padlocks, series of black and white prints of historic photos related to Kiama, timber stool.

LANDSCAPE/NATURAL FEATURES
Series of garden beds along the platform with established ornamental shrubs and small trees.
There are views from the Station footbridge and platform to the southeast to the ocean and Norfolk Island pine plantings along the Kiama ocean frontage respectively.
Physical condition and/or
Archaeological potential:
Platform building (1893): good
Island Platform (1893): good
Turntable (1897): extant, condition unknown
Ash pits x 2 (c. 1925): condition unknown
Footbridge (2005): very good
Bong Bong St overbridge (1990): very good
Date condition updated:11 Dec 09
Modifications and dates: 1925: platform extensions, removal of lamp room
1996: Station Master's residence destoryed by fire
2002: Line electrified
2005: Lift and footbridge
N.d: all yard structures removed except for turntable and ash pits.
N.d: Platform building- modern security screens to windows, some timber flush doors
2010: New heritage paint scheme and repairs undertaken.
2014: ETS (Electronic Ticketing Staff) decommissioned in situ.
2013: Turn table painted.
Current use: Railway Station
Former use: Nil

History

Historical notes: The first recorded reference to the district was by George Bass who anchored his 28ft whaleboat in the sheltered bay (now known as Kiama Harbour) in December 1797. Cedar getters were the first to the area, among those was David Smith, who became the first permanent white settler when he built a residence in Kiama in 1832. The site of Kiama Township was reserved by the Government in 1826 and proclaimed in 1836. Kiama was proclaimed a Municipality in 1859. In the 1870's the dairying industry was supplemented by basalt (blue metal) quarrying, now one of the district's major income earners alongside tourism.

Kiama Railway station opened in 1893 as part of the first completed stage of the Kiama to Jervis Bay Railway which terminated at Bomaderry (Nowra). Kiama was built as a passenger station and combined signal box on an island platform in the centre of the town. The goods yard was also opened and a locomotive sub-depot south of the station. From the timber footbridge, an elaborate landing and covered stair led down to the platform and the brick station was the first example of its type, the design of which was used at many stations built over the next 30 years. The design of the footbridge and stairs (plans dated 1892) were signed by Henry Deane. The line remains a single track with a crossing loop at the station.

The Kiama Railway Station yard was originally huge, extending from Terralong Street at the north end to Barney Street to the south. NSW Railways plans dated 1925 for "Station Arrangements" show (from north to south): a cottage south of Terralong Street; platform extensions and removal of a lamp room from the platform; retaining walls; a cream loading platform on the east side of the yard, east of the platform; tanks under the Bong Bong Street overbridge and a rest house southeast of the overbridge; a cattle yards and weighbridge southeast of the overbridge; and further south, stock yards and an engine shed and turntable (west of rail lines); a goods shed with platform and loading stage, and east of these, another rest house. At the far southern end of the yard, on the south-eastern side, was the Station Master's residence and the Dairy Farmers Co-operative Milk Company building (just north of the Barney Street overbridge).

Structures that have since disappeared include the footbridge and stairs, the Station Master’s residence, the Bong Bong Street overbridge, the goods shed and the engine shed. A Dairy Farmers Co-Op siding and a N.S.W. Produce Company siding opened in 1947 are also no longer used. Ash pits are shown in the 1925 plan of the station arrangements, north of the turntable: one within the (no longer extant) engine shed and one north of the engine shed.

In 2001-2002 the electrification of the line was completed from Dapto and in 2005 a lift to the platform was completed with a concrete footbridge link to Eddy Street and concrete stairs.

The group now includes the station building and platform, the 1897 turntable of 60-foot diameter and remaining trackwork.

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Pastoralism-Activities associated with the breeding, raising, processing and distribution of livestock for human use Servicing the pastoral industry-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Transport-Activities associated with the moving of people and goods from one place to another, and systems for the provision of such movements Transport of goods-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Transport-Activities associated with the moving of people and goods from one place to another, and systems for the provision of such movements Building the railway network-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Evolution of design in railway engineering and architecture-

Assessment of significance

SHR Criteria a)
[Historical significance]
Kiama Railway Station is of historical significance as the first railway station on this section of the Illawarra line completed in 1893 from Bombo to Bomaderry, and for its role as a transport hub for the town of Kiama since 1893. The yard remains are remnant structures from a once substantial yard layout which served the dairying and pastoral industries.
SHR Criteria c)
[Aesthetic significance]
The Kiama Railway Station's 1893 platform building is of aesthetic significance as the first example of an island platform building that became the model for the standard A8-A10 plans issued in 1899. The building has particularly fine detailing to platform facades and awnings. The turntable is of technical significance as evidence of late 19th century railway technology.
SHR Criteria d)
[Social significance]
The place has the potential to contribute to the local community's sense of place, and can provide a connection to the local community's past.
SHR Criteria f)
[Rarity]
The Kiama turntable is rare (one of only 3 turntables now extant on the Illawarra line - Bomaderry, Waterfall and Kiama).
SHR Criteria g)
[Representativeness]
The Kiama Railway Station platform building is considered a fine representative platform building of the design later known as A8-A10, predating the issue of the standard designs in 1899, and forming a model for platform buildings of this design.
Integrity/Intactness: The platform and platform building are intact except for minor additions (modern platform canopies). The yard structures at Kiama (with the exception of the turntable and possibly the ash pits) have been removed.
Assessment criteria: Items are assessed against the PDF State Heritage Register (SHR) Criteria to determine the level of significance. Refer to the Listings below for the level of statutory protection.

Recommended management:

1. Conservation principles: Conserve cultural heritage significance and minimise impacts on heritage values and fabric in accordance with the ‘Australia ICOMOS Charter for Places of Cultural Significance’. 2. Specialist advice: Seek advice from a qualified heritage specialist during all phases of a proposed project from feasibility, concept and option planning stage; detailed design; heritage approval and assessment; through to construction and finalisation. 3. Documentation: Prepare a Statement of Heritage Impact (SOHI) to assess, minimise and prevent heritage impacts as part of the assessment and approval phase of a project. Prepare a Conservation Management Plan (CMP) prior to proposing major works (such as new additions, change of use or proposed demolition) at all places of State significance and all complex sites of Local significance. 4. Maintenance and repair: Undertake annual inspections and proactive routine maintenance works to conserve heritage fabric in accordance with the ‘Minimum Standards of Maintenance & Repair’. 5. Movable heritage: Retain in situ and care for historic contents, fixtures, fittings, equipment and objects which contribute to cultural heritage significance. Return or reinstate missing features or relocated items where opportunities arise. 6. Aboriginal, archaeology and natural heritage: Consider all aspects of potential heritage significance as part of assessing and minimising potential impacts, including Aboriginal, archaeology and natural heritage. 7. Unidentified heritage items: Heritage inventory sheets do not describe or capture all contributory heritage items within an identified curtilage (such as minor buildings, structures, archaeology, landscape elements, movable heritage and significant interiors and finishes). Ensure heritage advice is sought on all proposed changes within a curtilage to conserve heritage significance. 8. Recording and register update: Record changes at heritage places through adequate project records and archival photography. Notify all changes to the Section 170 Heritage & Conservation Register administrator upon project completion.

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Heritage Act - s.170 NSW State agency heritage register     

Study details

TitleYearNumberAuthorInspected byGuidelines used
State Rail Authority Heritage Register Study1999SRA141State Rail Authority  No
Heritage and Conservation Register State Rail Authority of NSW199315Paul Davies for SRA  No
S170 Heritage & Conservation Register Update2009 Paul Davies Pty Ltd  Yes
S170 Heritage & Conservation Register Update2009 Paul Davies Pty Ltd  Yes
Heritage Platforms Conservation Management Strategy2015 Australian Museum Consulting  Yes

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
WrittenC.C. Singleton1946The Illawarra Line: Bombo- Nowra, N.S.W A.R.H.S. Bulletin VOL., XV, No 108, October
WrittenDavid Sheedy2009Historical Research for RailCorp S170 Register Update
Writtenwww.kiama.com.au/pages/history/2009Kiama History

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

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Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: State Government
Database number: 4801141


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